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I need to identify which objects are destroyed AND if there is any memory leaks on this code.

  void myfunc()
  { 
    Photo a(1, 2);
    Photo* pt = new Photo(2, 3);
    throw runtime_error("to test the exception");
  }

My answer was

the object is destroyed after the function end , by automatically calling the destructor of the class Photo.

There is a memory leak. We did not delete pt that is dynamically allocated with new operator. So we need to add delete pt; at the end of function.

Is my anwer is correct?

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Your answer is wrong. This is why smart pointers were invented. –  chris Apr 26 '13 at 1:53
3  
@chris The question is very oddly worded but I think the answer is right and your comment is wrong. –  Mooing Duck Apr 26 '13 at 1:54
3  
@MooingDuck, I was most specifically talking about putting delete pt; at the end. AFAIK, that won't execute when an exception is thrown before that line. –  chris Apr 26 '13 at 1:55
    
@chris good call, I overlooked that part –  Mooing Duck Apr 26 '13 at 1:56
    
Oh smart pointer... can anybody show the example with the smart pointer? –  user2172254 Apr 26 '13 at 3:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are wrong. try this:

void myfunc()
{ 
   Photo a(1, 2);
   Photo* pt = new Photo(2, 3);
   throw runtime_error("to test the exception");
   delete pt;
}

compile and run under valgrind. you will get a leak - delete pt; is never reached.

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Then should I put delete pt; before the throw line?? –  user2172254 Apr 26 '13 at 2:09
    
If you must use delete here you would need to place it before the throw in order for it to be executed. If you don't need to use delete use smart pointers (std::unique_ptr). Scope Based Resource Management (SBRM) wants to be your friend. –  Captain Obvlious Apr 26 '13 at 2:15
    
no. no. that will not help in the general case. you should use RAII - that is, smart pointers, as chris and Captain Obvlious noted in their comments. if that's impossible, use try and catch (...) { delete pt; throw; }. –  Elazar Apr 26 '13 at 2:16
    
@CaptainObvlious, I've never heard that specific term, but I do like it better than RAII. It's a shame the first thing that comes up when I search SBRM is The Santa Barbara Rescue Mission. –  chris Apr 26 '13 at 2:50
    
Apparently I have a word association problem today...that should read Scope Bound Resource Management. SBRM and RAII are the same thing. Member variables are scoped to the class they are declared in just as local variables are scoped to a function. This is called automatic storage duration since they are automatically created and destroyed. Resources which are allocated and release through new and `delete have dynamic storage duration and need to be managed manually. –  Captain Obvlious Apr 26 '13 at 3:50

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