Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've tried overloading the bracket operators for a class, to make accessing the array less tedious. What I don't understand is, why is it neccesary to declare the return type of the overload function as a reference? Why is it not an lvalue to begin with?

struct particle
{
    double v_x;
} 

struct particleSwarm
{
    int numParticles;
    particle* particles;
    particle operator[](int i) { return particles[i]; }
}

It returns a particle struct, so why is this not valid, unless I make the operator return a reference:

void foo(particleSwarm& swarm)
{
    swarm[0].v_x = 5.0;
}

What I don't understand is, why isn't the overloaded function already returning an lvalue? When trying to figure it out, I discovered that something like this is valid:

int* foo(particleSwarm* swarm)
{
    return &(swarm->numParticles);
}

void bar(particleSwarm* swarm)
{
    *(foo(swarm)) = 5;
}

Why is the pointer returned by foo a valid lvalue that can be dereferenced and assigned to, but not the object returned by the overload? I see how it wouldn't be if I were assigning directly to it, since I haven't overloaded =, but I'm assigning to one of it's member variables, which it seems like should be valid? I'm just having a hard time understanding, so I appreciate anyone who takes the time to help!

share|improve this question
1  
It's not an lvalue because you told it to make a copy. It's not anything by default. The pointer returned by foo is not a valid lvalue, it's an rvalue. However, when you dereference the pointer the result of that is an lvalue. –  Mooing Duck Apr 26 '13 at 2:29
    
a function call expression to a function returning a reference is lvalue –  Cubbi Apr 26 '13 at 2:31
    
I'm not sure where I told it to make a copy? Does return particles[i] make a copy? And as derefencing the pointer results in an lvalue, wouldn't calling for the member variable make the other an lvalue? Unless of course it's copied, but I don't understand why it's a copy =/ Edit: Thinking about it, I maybe understand why it's a copy? If it is returning a copy, why does declaring it as particle& operator[](int i){return particles[i]}; not return a copy? –  Fulluphigh Apr 26 '13 at 2:34
add comment

1 Answer

Your code

void foo(particleSwarm& swarm)
{
    swarm[0].v_x = 5.0;
}

will be compiled into something like

void foo(particleSwarm& swarm)
{
    particle tmp = swarm.operator[](0);
    tmp.v_x = 5.0;
    // destruct tmp
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why? That's what I don't understand. I don't see the connection from my code to this. –  Fulluphigh Apr 26 '13 at 5:23
    
Because your operator[] returns a value and not a reference. Returning a value means you do not want to change the original and you want a copy of the original value. –  brian beuning Apr 26 '13 at 12:08
    
Why does having the return type as a reference make things okay, even when you don't change the actual return in the code? I'm not doubting you, just trying to learn more =D –  Fulluphigh Apr 26 '13 at 20:44
    
A reference is syntactic sugar for a pointer. So you can change the original object thru the pointer. –  brian beuning Apr 26 '13 at 22:42
    
So, even though I don't change what I actually return inside the function, just what the function claims it returns, it no longer makes a copy, but returns a reference to the actual struct? It seems as if, if it were making a copy to begin with, the reference would be to the copy, which wouldn't do any good... That's clearly not the case, but... –  Fulluphigh Apr 27 '13 at 3:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.