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I am new to Oracle and I have two functions which will used with high frequency. And I wonder which is better between them.

This one:

FUNCTION GET_MY_MONEY (myType IN NUMBER) RETURN NUMBER AS
    var_amount   NUMBER;
    var_result   NUMBER;
BEGIN
    var_result := 0;
    var_amount := 0;
    SELECT amount INTO var_amount FROM mytable WHERE type = myType AND sysdate >= date_from AND sysdate <= date_to;
    var_result := var_amount*1000;
    RETURN var_result;
EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS THEN
        RETURN 0;
END;

or this one:

FUNCTION GET_MY_MONEY (myType IN NUMBER) RETURN NUMBER AS
    var_count    NUMBER;
    var_amount   NUMBER;
    var_result   NUMBER;
BEGIN
    var_result := 0;
    var_count := 0;
    var_amount := 0;
    SELECT count(*) INTO var_count FROM mytable WHERE type = myType AND sysdate >= date_from AND sysdate <= date_to;
    IF (var_count > 0) THEN
        SELECT amount INTO var_amount FROM mytable WHERE type = myType AND sysdate >= date_from AND sysdate <= date_to;
        var_result := var_amount*1000;
        RETURN var_result;
    ELSE RETURN 0; END IF;
EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS THEN
        RETURN 0;
END;

which is better for performance? which is return faster when they are called?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
1st Approach is better, when the number of records are very high. Because count(*) is a heavy operation –  Gopesh Sharma Apr 26 '13 at 5:55
1  
I would go with the first approach. I think you are confused with the variables used. var_count is not declared in the first and you are not using var_amount in the second. –  Eat Å Peach Apr 26 '13 at 5:57
1  
@GopeshSharma can you explain what you mean by count(*) being heavy? –  David Aldridge Apr 26 '13 at 6:26
3  
You ought to find out exactly which error(s) you regard as "valid" and trap them specifically instead of using WHEN OTHERS. –  David Aldridge Apr 26 '13 at 6:33
1  
Can you not use BETWEEN instead of the <= and >= ? –  David Aldridge Apr 26 '13 at 6:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In general, it depends. How frequently will you call the function and pass in a myType value that causes the query to return 0 rows?

If in the 99.9% of calls, the query will return exactly 1 row, then the second approach will run the query to be executed twice. While it's likely that the second call won't cause the function to be twice as expensive as the first since the blocks you're interested in are almost guaranteed to be cached, the second approach will almost certainly be substantially slower.

On the other hand, if a large fraction of calls will involve a myType value that doesn't return a row, the second approach will frequently not have to execute the query a second time. And the first approach will incur the overhead of handling the exception a large fraction of the time which will almost certainly be more expensive than the second query.

In most cases, the more efficient solution will be obvious based on the probability that 0 rows will be returned. Most of the time, the function is only called when the caller is pretty confident that the myType value they would be passing in is valid so the first approach would end up more efficient. As the fraction of calls that result in 0 rows being found increases, the second approach gets more efficient. Where that line is will depend on a number of factors not least of which being your table, your data, your hardware, and your Oracle version. You'd need to run a benchmark test to determine whether for your particular code the line of demarcation is 10% or 20% or 90%.

share|improve this answer
    
In my case, maybe over 80% of the query will return 0 rows. But in lesser 20% remain that will cost 2 times for scanning the table (which is large enough for considering). Can you explain why 'the overhead of handling the exception' is more expensive? I am new and i really don't know what are behind the scene when Oracle handling exception. –  PhatHV Apr 26 '13 at 6:26
3  
+1 for analysis, though I think the exception overhead is equal to zero compared to a second call to sql engine in a small fraction of calls of the function(I'm not sure, this is just a bet). The best would be to select nvl(sum(amount),0). –  Florin Ghita Apr 26 '13 at 6:46

The question was edited but SELECT amount INTO var_amount ... will fail if the there are more than one row.(maybe you want to select sum(amount)).

First approach is better because:

  • is far more intelligible
  • you don't scan the table twice.
  • in the second you get var_amount but you don't use it.
  • the count(*) is useless, you can just select nvl(sum(amount),0) as amount

However, you must assign a value to date variables(date_from and date_to) or put them as parameters. And you can return an expression, ie: RETURN var_count*1000;

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, especially on selecting SUM() in which case you don't need to trap exceptions at all. –  David Aldridge Apr 26 '13 at 6:32

In addition:

DECLARE
  v_retVal NUMBER:= 0;
  v_sal    NUMBER:= 0;
BEGIN
  SELECT nvl(sum(sal),0) as sal INTO v_sal 
    FROM scott.emp 
   WHERE deptno = 40; -- no data for deptno = 40 

   -- No exception needed, function will always return 0 or value --
   v_retVal:= (CASE WHEN v_sal = 0 THEN 0 ELSE v_sal*1000 END);

   dbms_output.put_line (v_retVal);

  -- RETURN v_retVal;
END;
/
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