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I've coded a win server application in C. I have to compile it into a .dll, and as a 32-bit .dll on a 32-bit machine, it works beautifully. However, when I compile as 64 bit using cmake tool and put the same code in 64-bit machine and specify that it compile for 64-bit, and I run the program, it crashes on a line that frees some memory.

My question is this: What causes this? Why does a program, coded exactly the same, crash on a memory free in its 64-bit version on a 64-bit machine, and not the 32-bit version on a 32-bit machine? Is it any difference in win 32 bit server and win 64 bit server.Please help me to get difference of memory structure in both type of windows os.

Version info: I'm using Visual Studio 2010, win 2008 R2

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Show some code if you want help instead of guessing. –  Randy Howard Apr 26 '13 at 7:13
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you might have written a non portable code. –  Koushik Apr 26 '13 at 7:23
    
this is something I am expecting generic win 64 bit memory issue.So please give me the idea about the difference between win 32-64 bit scenario which will cause this problem. –  user1488334 Apr 26 '13 at 7:39

1 Answer 1

What causes this? Why does a program, coded exactly the same way, crash on a memory free in its 64-bit version on a 64-bit machine, and not the 32-bit version on a 32-bit machine?

Because your code is incorrect. By chance it works on 32 bit, but compiling for 64 bit, with different pointer size, exposes the faults in your code.

Is there any difference in win 32 bit server and win 64 bit server? Please help me to get difference of memory structure in both type of windows OS.

The principal difference is that pointers are 32 bits wide on 32 bit, and 64 bits wide on 64 bit. There are obviously many other differences, but from your perspective it's pointer size that matters.

Far and away the most common bug uncovered by a port from 32 to 64 bit is pointer truncation. Say you have code that casts pointers to ints.

int i = (int) p;

That happens to work at runtime when compiled for 32 bit, but on 64 bit you lose half of the pointer. When you later cast back to a pointer

int* p = (int*) i;

you don't get the same pointer that you started with. Fundamentally the problem is that the code made the assumption that an int, which is 4 bytes wide on Windows, is the same size as a pointer. That assumption holds for 32 bit, but not for 64 bit.

You'll likely be suffering from this problem and very likely other more subtle problems. In order to solve the problem you will need to debug the process in detail.

I think you are looking for some simple switch that will make your program work. There is no magic solution because the problem lies in your code. And so it will need to be carefully debugged.

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