Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I am having trouble using qsort to sort an array of structures.

I used this link as an example: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/73853

When I run the program it gives me blanks for the names that were originally in the structure and zeroes for all the values of gp.

typedef int (*compfn)(const void*, const void*);

struct record
{
    char player[20];
    int gp;
};
struct record entries[15];

int compare(struct record *, struct record *);


void show ()           
{
    int v;
    qsort((void *)entries, 10, sizeof(struct record), (compfunc)compare);
    struct record *p = entries;
    for(v=0;v<counter;v++, p++)
    {
         printf("%s ..... %d \n", p->player , p->gp);
    }
}

int compare(struct record * p1, struct record * p2)
{
     if( p1->gp < p2->gp)
         return -1;
     else if (p1->gp > p2->gp)
         return 1;
     else
         return 0;
}

Edit: Hey everyone thanks so much for all your help but, I have tried everything you guys have said and it still just turns everything value to zero

share|improve this question
    
this should not compile. –  Andreas Grapentin Apr 26 '13 at 7:22
1  
Apart from (compfunc) to (compfn) its working for me –  999k Apr 26 '13 at 7:31

2 Answers 2

Your call can be simplified, no need to cast to void *:

qsort(entries, 10, sizeof entries[0], compare);

Note use of sizeof entries[0] to avoid pointless repetition of the array type.

There should be no cast of the comparison function either, since it should simply be defined to match the prototype:

static int compare(const void *a, const void *b)
{
  const struct record *ra = a, *rb = b;

  if( ra->gp < rb->gp)
     return -1;
  if (ra->gp > rb->gp)
     return 1;
  return 0;
}

By the way, just to be informational, here's a classic (?) way to tersify the 3-way testing that you sometimes see in places like these:

return (ra->gp < rb->gp) ? -1 : (ra->gp > rb->gp);

I do not argue for this way of expressing it, especially not if you're a beginner, but thought I'd include it since it's relevant and might be instructional to have seen.

share|improve this answer
    
The "classic" way I've seen is return (ra->gp > rb->gp) - (ra->gp < rb->gp); –  caf Apr 26 '13 at 9:15
1  
The "classic" way I've seen is return (ra->gp - rb->gp) but I don't know if windows' qsort requires the results of the compare function to be in { -1, 0, 1 }, the linux qsort doesn't. –  Andreas Grapentin May 1 '13 at 11:51

Apart from the fact that the microsoft support pages are a real mess and not a good source for learning C, your code is missing an & here:

...
qsort((void *)entries, 10, sizeof(struct record), (compfunc)compare);
... 

should be

...
qsort((void *)&entries, 10, sizeof(struct record), (compfunc)compare);
... 

also, I think you meant to write

...
qsort((void *)&entries, 15, sizeof(struct record), (compfn)compare);
... 
share|improve this answer
    
Array names are implicitly converted to pointers when used in an expression. –  luser droog Apr 26 '13 at 7:33
    
@luserdroog I know. I just wanted to stick as close as possible to the code provided by the microsoft support page, and by the OP. –  Andreas Grapentin Apr 26 '13 at 7:34
    
Oh, I see. I hadn't bothered to look at that page. I wonder why they didn't write (void *)(struct record *)&entries[0]: much clearer. :) –  luser droog Apr 26 '13 at 7:38
    
Yea the only reason I even used the microsoft page is because on a smilar question on stackoverflow someone posted that link and said that it was a good example haha –  user2322610 Apr 26 '13 at 17:40
    
@user2322610 oh, in that case look at unwind's answer or the manpage of qsort (linux.die.net/man/3/qsort) –  Andreas Grapentin Apr 27 '13 at 6:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.