Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Spring MVC for a simple JSON API, with @ResponseBody based approach like the following. (I already have a service layer producing JSON directly.)

@RequestMapping(value = "/matches/{matchId}", produces = "application/json")
@ResponseBody
public String match(@PathVariable String matchId) {
    String json = matchService.getMatchJson(matchId);
    if (json == null) {
        // TODO: how to respond with e.g. 400 "bad request"?
    }
    return json;
}

Question is, in the given scenario, what is the simplest, cleanest way to respond with a HTTP 400 error?

I'm new to Spring MVC, and this turned out somewhat non-obvious... I did come across approaches like:

return new ResponseEntity(HttpStatus.BAD_REQUEST);

...but I can't use it here since my method's return type is String, not ResponseEntity.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 100 down vote accepted

change your return type to ResponseEntity<String>, then you can use below for 400

return new ResponseEntity<String>(HttpStatus.BAD_REQUEST);

and for correct request

return new ResponseEntity<String>(json,HttpStatus.OK);
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, so you can use ResponseEntity like this too. This works nicely and is a just a simple change to the original code—thanks! –  Jonik Apr 27 '13 at 16:22
    
you are welcome any time you can add custom header too check all constructors of ResponseEntity –  Bobo Zohdy Apr 27 '13 at 22:27
    
gold! thanks, mate –  Peter Perháč Feb 21 '14 at 16:39
1  
What if you are passing something other than a string back? As in a POJO or other object? –  mrshickadance Nov 18 '14 at 16:28
1  
it will be 'ResponseEntity<YourClass>' –  Bobo Zohdy Nov 19 '14 at 10:29

Something like this should work, I'm not sure whether or not there is a simpler way:

@RequestMapping(value = "/matches/{matchId}", produces = "application/json")
@ResponseBody
public String match(@PathVariable String matchId, @RequestBody String body,
            HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) {
    String json = matchService.getMatchJson(matchId);
    if (json == null) {
        response.setStatus( HttpServletResponse.SC_BAD_REQUEST  );
    }
    return json;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This works and is pretty simple too. (In this case it could be further simplified by removing the unused body and request params.) –  Jonik Apr 27 '13 at 9:18

Not necessarily the most compact way of doing this, but quite clean IMO

if(json == null) {
    throw new BadThingException();
}
...

@ExceptionHandler(BadThingException.class)
@ResponseStatus(value = HttpStatus.BAD_REQUEST)
public @ResponseBody MyError handleException(BadThingException e) {
    return new MyError("That doesnt work");
}

Edit you can use @ResponseBody in the exception handler method if using Spring 3.1+, otherwise use a ModelAndView or something.

https://jira.springsource.org/browse/SPR-6902

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, this doesn't seem to work. It produces HTTP 500 "server error" with long stack trace in logs: ERROR org.springframework.web.servlet.mvc.method.annotation.ExceptionHandlerExceptionR‌​esolver - Failed to invoke @ExceptionHandler method: public controller.TestController$MyError controller.TestController.handleException(controller.TestController$BadThingExce‌​ption) org.springframework.web.HttpMediaTypeNotAcceptableException: Could not find acceptable representation Is there something missing from the answer? –  Jonik Apr 27 '13 at 8:52
    
Also, I didn't fully understand the point of defining yet another custom type (MyError). Is that necessary? I'm using latest Spring (3.2.2). –  Jonik Apr 27 '13 at 8:54
1  
It works for me. I use javax.validation.ValidationException instead. (Spring 3.1.4) –  Jerry Chen Oct 1 '13 at 1:48
    
This is quite useful in situations where you have an intermediate layer between your service and the client where the intermediate layer has its own error handling capabilities. Thank you for this example @Zutty –  StormeHawke Dec 9 '14 at 15:57

I would change the implementation slightly:

First, I create a UnknownMatchException:

@ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.NOT_FOUND)
public class UnknownMatchException extends RuntimeException {
    public UnknownMatchException(String matchId) {
        super("Unknown match: " + matchId);
    }
}

Note the use of @ResponseStatus, which will be recognized by Spring's ResponseStatusExceptionResolver. If the exception is thrown, it will create a response with the corresponding response status. (I also took the liberty of changing the status code to 404 - Not Found which I find more appropriate for this use case, but you can stick to HttpStatus.BAD_REQUEST if you like.)


Next, I would change the MatchService to have the following signature:

interface MatchService {
    public Match findMatch(String matchId);
}

Finally, I would update the controller and delegate to Spring's MappingJackson2HttpMessageConverter to handle the JSON serialization automatically (it is added by default if you add Jackson to the classpath and add either @EnableWebMvc or <mvc:annotation-driven /> to your config, see the reference docs):

@RequestMapping(value = "/matches/{matchId}", produces = MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_VALUE)
@ResponseBody
public Match match(@PathVariable String matchId) {
    // throws an UnknownMatchException if the matchId is not known 
    return matchService.findMatch(matchId);
}

Note, it is very common to separate the domain objects from the view objects or DTO objects. This can easily be achieved by adding a small DTO factory that returns the serializable JSON object:

@RequestMapping(value = "/matches/{matchId}", produces = MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_VALUE)
@ResponseBody
public MatchDTO match(@PathVariable String matchId) {
    Match match = matchService.findMatch(matchId);
    return MatchDtoFactory.createDTO(match);
}
share|improve this answer

I think this thread actually has the easiest, cleanest solution, that does not sacrifice the JSON martialing tools that Spring provides:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/16986372/1278921

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.