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My HTML:

<div class="outer">
    <div class="inner">
        Lorem Ipsum
        <div class="innerest">
            <!-- no content -->
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="inner">
        Lorem Ipsum
        <div class="innerest">
            <!-- no content -->
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

My CSS:

.outer {
    background: red;
    padding: 6px 20px;
    z-index: 10;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.inner {
    background: green;
    z-index: 11;
    float: left;
    margin-left: 12px;
}

.innerest {
    background: blue;
    width: 30px;
    height: 20px;
    z-index: 9;
    position: absolute;
}

Here's a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jsnlry/ycJdy/

I want the blue boxes to be behind the red one. It seems, that z-index is ignored in this case. But why?

Any idea?

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2  
allways used z-index with position –  Rohit Azad Apr 26 '13 at 11:19
    
this link useful for you. –  Sandeep Apr 26 '13 at 11:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do you mean like this:

http://jsfiddle.net/audetwebdesign/WJzRY/

.innerest {
    z-index: -1;
}

Why This Works...

By default, z-index is auto which computes to 0, all elements have the same stacking level.

In my fiddle, I set up a sequence of styles to show what is happening.

You start off with a parent div with two floated children which are out of flow, and the parent height collapses to 12px high because of the padding (Ex 1).

When you declare overflow: hidden, you start a new block formatting context and the floated child elements are retained in the context of the parent, which is why the red background fully covers the child elements (Ex 2).

Finally, you can add absolute positioning to the .innerest elements, and this takes them out of the flow and they project out of the .outer ancestor element. Note that the floated elements affect the computed height of the containing block, unlike absolutely positioned elements. On the right .innerest element, you add z-index: -1 which places this element below all the other elements in the stacking order (computed to 0), so you get the desired effect.

Reference

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/visuren.html#layers

share|improve this answer
    
Great! But why is this? Why must the value be negative? –  Ethan Leroy Apr 26 '13 at 11:20
    
I need a few minutes to review your code and to compose a coherent explanation that will be useful to someone other than myself.... check back in a bit! –  Marc Audet Apr 26 '13 at 11:22
    
Thanks, but I think ahdaniels' answer tells everything. It seems to be because of the position-parameter. –  Ethan Leroy Apr 26 '13 at 11:40
    
Thanks for this detailed answer. Now I have another element below the outer-div and the innerest-div should also be above this one. I added an orange block to my innerest. The blue boxes should be above the orange one. Would be great if you could tell me any way to achieve this. jsfiddle.net/jsnlry/ycJdy/25 –  Ethan Leroy Apr 26 '13 at 19:19

In this example z-index only works on the position:absolute element. Try putting a negative value like -9 and it should work.

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Please add z-index: -1 to innerest class. it will be work.

 .innerest {
 background: blue;
 width: 30px;
 height: 20px;
 z-index: -1;
 position: absolute;

}

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Try adding a negative z-index (-1) to your .innerest class.

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Now used to this code define your .outer class position relative and remove overflow hidden

    .outer {
            background: red;
            padding: 6px 20px;
            position:relative; //add this line 

        }

.outer:after{
content:"";
clear:both;
overflow:hidden;
display:table;
}

    .innerest {
        z-index: -1; // add this line
        position: absolute;
    }

Demo

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