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I have 3 classes:

  1. BaseClass
  2. Middleclass inheriting from BaseClass
  3. ClientClass inheriting the Middleclass

I wonder how do I hide a method at BaseClass to not appear in ClientClass?

Example:

public class BaseClass
{
    public void BaseMethod1()
    {
    }

    public void BaseMethod2()
    {
    }
}

public class MiddleClass : BaseClass
{
    public void MiddleMethod()
    {
        this.BaseMethod1();
    }
}

public class ClientClass : MiddleClass
{
    public void Test()
    {
        this.MiddleMethod();
        this.BaseMethod1(); // I can't see this method here
    }
}

Edit: I modified my sample, I put "this.BaseMethod1();" in MiddleClasse

share|improve this question
2  
Could you explain why do you want to do this? –  svick Apr 26 '13 at 12:41
    
Not appear publicly, or not at all? You could use a modified version of this answer to make it private in ClientClass while still keeping it public in MiddleClass. –  Jim Apr 26 '13 at 12:42
1  
It seems you are using inheritance not in the rigth place –  sll Apr 26 '13 at 12:44
2  
You're trying to wantonly and brutally violate the Liskov Substitution Principle. This is not a good idea. –  TeaDrivenDev Apr 26 '13 at 12:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this, which breaks the direct inheritance tree:

public interface IBaseClass
{
    void BaseMethod1();
    void BaseMethod2();
}

public class BaseClass : IBaseClass
{
    public void BaseMethod1()
    {
    }

    public void BaseMethod2()
    {
    }
}

public class MiddleClass : IBaseClass
{
    BaseClass @base;

    public MiddleClass() { this.@base=new BaseClass(); }

    public void MiddleMethod()
    {
        @base.BaseMethod1();
    }

    void IBaseClass.BaseMethod1()
    {
        //@base.BaseMethod1();
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void BaseMethod2()
    {
        @base.BaseMethod2();
    }
}

public class ClientClass : MiddleClass
{
    public void Test()
    {
        this.MiddleMethod();
        // 'ClientClass' does not contain a definition for 'BaseMethod1'
        //this.BaseMethod1(); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's close. Though you should be aware that you can still do ((IBaseClass)this).BaseMethod1(). –  svick Apr 26 '13 at 13:23
    
@svick - Not now, I edited the post to throw an exception in this case. The base method is ONLY accessible through MiddleMethod(). –  ja72 Apr 26 '13 at 13:31
1  
This is the reason interfaces where invented. To deal with loose inheritance problems like this. –  ja72 Apr 26 '13 at 14:54
1  
Well - a possible downside is that ClientClass no longer IS-A BaseClass. If there were other BaseClass members that ClientClass was expecting to inherit, it no longer does, unless you use more code to make them available through MiddleClass. Also, IBaseClass.BaseMethod1 now has to be understood to throw NotImplementedException under certain (undetectable) circumstances, which makes using this hierarchy in a polymorphic way a bit like a game of Russian Roulette :P –  shambulator Apr 26 '13 at 15:41
1  
@shambulator - I agree, so the developer needs to add a disclaimer in the DocXml that not all methods of IBaseClass are necessary implemented at all times. –  ja72 Apr 27 '13 at 13:11

You need to define that method as private. Just for reference, here you have more information about access modifiers

public: The type or member can be accessed by any other code in the same assembly or another assembly that references it.

private: The type or member can be accessed only by code in the same class or struct.

protected: The type or member can be accessed only by code in the same class or struct, or in a class that is derived from that class.

internal: The type or member can be accessed by any code in the same assembly, but not from another assembly.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think the implicit question here is how to make the method invisible to ClientClass while keeping it accessible in MiddleClass which, as others have pointed out, probably calls for a re-design. –  shambulator Apr 26 '13 at 12:50
    
Thanks Claudio! I tried change access modifiers, but don't work. –  Nandoviski Apr 26 '13 at 14:47

I've always believed that if you want to hide some functionality in a base class from some, but not all, derived classes then it's a code smell and your design needs re-thinking.

share|improve this answer
    
that would also violate the Liskov substitution principle –  b_meyer Apr 26 '13 at 13:47

Define method BaseMethod1 as protected in BaseClass,than you can use function BaseMethod1 in MiddleClass.

public class BaseClass
{
    protected void BaseMethod1()
    {
    }

    public void BaseMethod2()
    {
    }
}

public class MiddleClass : BaseClass
{
    public void MiddleMethod()
    {
       base.BaseMethod1();
    }
    // hide method
    private new void BaseMethod1()
    {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But what if he needs the base class functionality in MiddleClass using new will override the base class implementation. –  ByteBlast Apr 26 '13 at 12:40
    
@ByteBlast: If the implementation is base.BaseMethod(), then he'll have it in MiddleClass but not in ClientClass. –  zimdanen Apr 26 '13 at 12:42
    
protected is correct –  misak Apr 26 '13 at 12:52
1  
@misak It isn't. Have you tried this code? ClientClass defined as per the question can still call the BaseClass version of BaseMethod1. –  shambulator Apr 26 '13 at 12:58
1  
@ja72 That makes no difference. Using new just makes the hiding explicit and stops the compiler from warning you. –  shambulator Apr 26 '13 at 13:01

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