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I am making a pure virtual destructor to force a class to be abstract that contains no methods apart from the ctor. I am doing this as a header-only implementation

struct abstractSchema
{
    abstractSchema(...): ... { ... }
    virtual ~abstractSchema() = 0;    
};
inline abstractSchema::~abstractSchema(){}

Is there any syntactic sugar like (the illegal) virtual ~abstractSchema(){} = 0; that would allow me to declare and define on a single line, rather than having to split the definition and implementation like in the above example?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is as close as you can get:

struct abstractSchema
{
    virtual ~abstractSchema(){}
    protected: abstractSchema(...): ... { ... }
};

It's not abstract, but it can't be instantiated by itself so might meet your needs.

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That'll do nicely. Thanks –  learnvst Apr 26 '13 at 13:16

You can:

struct abstractSchema
{
    virtual ~abstractSchema() = 0 {}
};

Not sure about standard-compliant compilers, but MSVC (2010) compiles this code just fine.

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5  
This isn't legal C++. –  Charles Bailey Apr 26 '13 at 12:57
    
@CharlesBailey Come on. I've just compiled this code in MSVC –  Valeri Atamaniouk Apr 26 '13 at 12:57
8  
LOL :) .......... –  Charles Bailey Apr 26 '13 at 12:58
1  
@ValeriAtamaniouk: illegal as per 10.4/2. –  Fanael Apr 26 '13 at 13:00
1  
-1: Question asked about C++, not some specific implementation's extensions. You can have a symbolic +1 for being right, though. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 26 '13 at 13:07

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