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The question is really what the title says.

The reason for the question:
The map func is slower than the for loop in the code below.
Is it because of some problem in my code, or is there something else??

Code:

import timeit

setup = '''
def translate(x):
    x[1]+=1
    x[2]+=1
    x[3]+=1

atoms = [[1,1,1,1]]*1000
'''
smt1 = '''for i in atoms: translate(i)'''
smt2 = '''map(translate, atoms)'''

time_for = timeit.Timer(setup=setup, stmt=smt1)
time_map = timeit.Timer(setup=setup, stmt=smt2)

print time_for.timeit(10000)
print time_map.timeit(10000)

Output(Windows 7(64-bit) I-3 2nd gen):

>>> 
3.4691164256
3.5064888507

Output(Windows 7(32-bit) core2duo):

>>>
5.58571625252
6.25803459664

I guess I should mention that I am using Python 2.7.3, so although map in Python 3 is a generator, it is not so in Python 2, so this "problem" can't be replicated on Python 3.


Update:

To address those who said that atoms should be immutable, here's a different version of setup (it's slower, but still shows the difference):

setup = '''
def translate(x):
    return tuple(i+1 for i in x)

atoms = [(1,1,1,1)]*1000
'''

Output(Windows 7(32-bit) core2duo):

>>> 
31.0213507144
29.7194933508
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Wooble, plaes, Roman C, Anand, Stony Apr 27 '13 at 9:24

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
[[1,1,1,1]]*1000 actually creates 1000 copies of same object. –  undefined is not a function Apr 26 '13 at 13:36
2  
Proving a statement with an existential qualifier only requires one example, which you've provided, so... yes. –  Wooble Apr 26 '13 at 13:36
2  
Please be aware that your two operations aren't doing the same thing. (Can you spot why they're different?) –  mgilson Apr 26 '13 at 13:38
4  
The difference you show is too small. Though I can't imagine why you think map would be faster in this case, the benchmark does not strongly state that one approach is better or the other. What you observe could easily be noise. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 26 '13 at 13:39
1  
I think the best answer to this question is just “Yes, a for-loop is faster than a map in some cases.” – It just depends a lot on what you are doing… –  poke Apr 26 '13 at 14:11

6 Answers 6

That is because map creates a new structure whereas for only modifies the current one.

share|improve this answer
    
Even though this statement is correct, it apparently doesn't account for the differences. (see my answer). Even building a list, map still ends up slower. –  mgilson Apr 26 '13 at 13:44
    
I should preface this... even building a list, map still ends up slower on my machine. With timings this close, you can get significant variation from computer to computer and OS, etc. –  mgilson Apr 26 '13 at 14:02

A few observations.

  • Usually it's a bad idea to do [[1,1,1,1]]*n. This creates n references to the same list. It's fine to do [None]*n though as None is immutable.
  • you're building a list with map but not with the loop. That introduces some overhead
  • there's another option (list comp)

import timeit

setup = '''
def translate(x):
    x[1]+=1
    x[2]+=1
    x[3]+=1

atoms = [[1,1,1,1] for _ in range(1000) ]
'''
smt1 = '''lst = []
for i in atoms: lst.append(translate(i))'''
smt2 = '''map(translate, atoms)'''
smt3 = '''[translate(i) for i in atoms]'''

time_for = timeit.Timer(setup=setup, stmt=smt1)
time_map = timeit.Timer(setup=setup, stmt=smt2)
time_lc  = timeit.Timer(setup=setup, stmt=smt3)

print time_for.timeit(10000)
print time_map.timeit(10000)
print time_lc.timeit(10000)

With that said. map is still slower for me.

7.49916100502
7.83171486855
6.13082003593

and list comprehension wins hands down.

As a point of style however, I would definitely use the for loop here. Since you're not returning anything from translate, it is the cleanest alternative. Using map and list-comprehensions for "side effects" is generally not preferred practice.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you testing on 2.x or 3.x? –  Aya Apr 26 '13 at 13:50
    
Same test, 4.527 vs. 3.604 vs. 3.900 on my computer (Py 2.7-x64 on Win8-x64). –  poke Apr 26 '13 at 13:51
2  
@Aya 2.7.3 (notice the print statement) and on python3, map would return almost instantly since it wouldn't actually do anything. –  mgilson Apr 26 '13 at 13:55
1  
[[None]]*n is not advisable, since it references the same list [None] n-times! What you probably mean is [None]*n, which is fine. –  David Zwicker Apr 26 '13 at 13:57
1  
@DavidZwicker -- that's precisely what I meant. I suppose that's what I get for answering questions on a bus after a long night on a plane... –  mgilson Apr 26 '13 at 13:58

Your translate function is wrong as it actually returns None. And atoms = [[1,1,1,1]]*1000 is nothing but a copy of same object 1000 times.

Here's my timing results:

In [49]: def translate(x):
    x[:3]=[y+1 for y in x[:3]]
    return x
   ....: 
In [54]: lis = [[1,1,1,1] for _ in xrange(10**5)]

using map():

In [55]: %timeit map(translate,lis)
1 loops, best of 3: 151 ms per loop

For-loop:

#this is fast as no list is created in this, i.e you're not storing the 
#returned value anywhere. So technically it's not equivalent to a LC or `map`.

In [56]: %timeit for i in lis: translate(i)  
1 loops, best of 3: 146 ms per loop

List comprehension:

In [57]: %timeit [translate(i) for i in lis]
1 loops, best of 3: 153 ms per loop

From the docs:

Python supports a couple of looping constructs. The for statement is most commonly used. It loops over the elements of a sequence, assigning each to the loop variable. If the body of your loop is simple, the interpreter overhead of the for loop itself can be a substantial amount of the overhead. This is where the map function is handy. You can think of map as a for moved into C code. The only restriction is that the "loop body" of map must be a function call. Besides the syntactic benefit of list comprehensions, they are often as fast or faster than equivalent use of map.

So in most cases map outperforms a list comprehension only when used with a built-in function.

share|improve this answer

Any difference between the two is unlikely to be the bottleneck in your application, which means you can just use the one you think is clearer.

share|improve this answer
5  
True but not an answer. –  delnan Apr 26 '13 at 13:41

I'm unable to replicate your results in Python 3.3 (both map and range now return a lazy iterator rather than a list):

In [7]: %timeit list(map(lambda x: x + 1, range(1000)))
1000 loops, best of 3: 218 us per loop

In [8]: %timeit [x + 1 for x in range(1000)]
10000 loops, best of 3: 99.5 us per loop
share|improve this answer
    
Using python 2.7.3 –  Schoolboy Apr 26 '13 at 13:41
    
Your benchmark is very different from OP's, so the results are not as easily comparable. –  delnan Apr 26 '13 at 13:42
    
@delnan - sure, they're not doing the same thing. My version should be a more direct comparison of map and for than OP. –  Benjamin Hodgson Apr 26 '13 at 13:43
    
Your version doesn't benchmark a for loop though, it benchmarks list comprehension. –  delnan Apr 26 '13 at 13:44
    
@delnan List comprehension compiles to the same bytecode as for. –  Benjamin Hodgson Apr 26 '13 at 13:45

Please note that your two operation do different things.

smt1 iterates through your list, translates each item and throws away the result. smt2 actually translates all elements and returns a list which contains all the changed objects.

So the map is actually more complicated than the first statement, simply because it stores all the translated items.

You can change the first statement to a list comprehension to make it return the same result:

smt1 = '''[translate(i) for i in atoms]'''

When I do that, I get the following results:

3.8775811587063767    list comprehension
3.4751189085098315    map

Also note that in Python 3, map became a generator. This means that it lazily performs that translation as you request more items from it. So that is actually another reason to prefer map here.

share|improve this answer
    
If you don't need a list of None values (which is what either map or a list comprehension produces when given translate), you shouldn't use either in place of a for loop. –  chepner Apr 26 '13 at 13:49
    
@chepner I don’t think we really need to discuss the translate function here; the tests are fundamentally different. –  poke Apr 26 '13 at 13:52
1  
My point is that if you don't need the new list, neither map nor a list comprehension should be used simply as a syntactic alternative to a for loop. –  chepner Apr 26 '13 at 13:55
    
@chepner The original intention is not really clear in the question, so that’s all just wild guessing. It’s not clear if it was intended that the function returns nothing, the atoms list contains 1000 times the same reference, nor that the for-statement didn’t produce a list. From the help for map it should be clear that a list is generated, so I actually doubt that it was just a way to apply stuff to throw-away objects. –  poke Apr 26 '13 at 14:00
    
@chepner And with the now updated question, I guess this is cleared up, right? –  poke Apr 26 '13 at 14:02

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