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Can someone point out which scope rule do C# and R differ so that they produce different result in the following examples?

C#

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var funs = new Action<string>[5];
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        int j = i;
        {
            funs[j] = x => Console.WriteLine(j);
        }
    }
    funs[2]("foo"); // prints 2
}

R

funclist <- list()
for(i in 1:5)
{
  {
    j<-i
    funclist[[j]] <- function(x) print(j)
  } // the 5 inner blocks share the same scope?
}

funclist[[2]]('foo') // prints 5

Update

This question is helpful R: usage of local variables

I believe I found out the difference - In R there is NO document saying that a block would create a new scope. So only function can create a new scope, for loop cannot, brackets cannot.

Any one can give me a link to some definitive guide in R that clearly states brackets other than functions would NOT create a new scope?

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I am unfamiliar with R, but here is a clarifying question. If you said i<-1 / j<-i / i<-2 / print(j) would you get 1 or 2? Is j an alias for i or is it a copy of i? –  Eric Lippert Apr 26 '13 at 14:45
    
@EricLippert, in that case, you would get the value 1. R copies by value. The issue is that the object j when evaluating the function is not the same j when the function was created. –  Ricardo Saporta Apr 26 '13 at 14:50
1  
The section on lazy evaluation here on hadley's wiki may also shed some light wrt R. –  Arun Apr 26 '13 at 15:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not sure about C#, but as for R, the functions are evaluated lazily.

The j in print(j) does not get evaluated until the time the function gets called. Thus when you call funclist[[2]]('foo') only then does R search for the value of j, which when last left off, was 5. However, try the following and you'll see the value is not related to the loop at all.

j <- "Some Other Value"
funclist[[2]]('foo')

Update regarding question in the comment

In R, a for loop does not affect the scope or environment. (On the other hand, functions and apply like loops do). Thus to clarify, you cannot initialize a variable inside of a nested * environment* and access it from the parent environment [1]. You can however do the opposite; that is access the objects of a parent's environment from within the children environment.

As is clearly depicted in this picture in Ross Ihaka's sign Ross Ihaka & Robert Gentleman source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/07/technology/business-computing/07program.html?pagewanted=all

For more on scoping in R, see: http://cran.r-project.org/doc/contrib/Fox-Companion/appendix-scope.pdf

[1] The statement above is not altogether true. You can access such a variable using the get(.., envir=..) function. But you cannot access it directly in the way you can access parent's objects from inside nested functions.

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In R, what is the scope of j? To be clear, since this word is used to mean many different things, by "what is the scope of j?" I mean "what is *the region of program text in which it is legal to refer to variable j by name?" Your answer implies that j can be initialized inside two nested blocks, and yet used outside. How far out does it go? Is j "in scope" throughout the entire program? –  Eric Lippert Apr 26 '13 at 15:17
    
@EricLippert Perhaps more concisely: assuming the OP's code is run as is in a fresh R session, j could "legally" be referred to (i.e. R will find and return a value, rather than throw an error) at any point after a value is assigned to it. So anytime after j <- i the first time through the for loop. –  joran Apr 26 '13 at 16:08

To expand a bit on @RicardoSaporta's answer.

In R run the command:

environment(funclist[[2]])

and you will see that the parent environment for the function(s) is the global environment, so since j is never made local to the functions, when they run they will not find any variable named j in the local environment, so the next thing they will do is to look in the enclosing environment, which is the global environment and use whatever the current value of j is there. If you do rm(j) then run any of the functions you will get an error that it cannot find j.

If you want each of the functions to have its own enclosing environment with different values of j then you can do something like:

funclist <- list()
for(i in 1:5)
{
   funclist[[i]] <- local( {
    j <- i
    function(x) print(j)
    } )
}

funclist[[2]]('foo') # prints 2
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I don't know anything about R but I can tell you what is happening in C# here.

In C# when you enter a function you get an activation of that function; that "activation" keeps track of the state of all the variables and temporary values used by that invocation of the function. This is how functions can be recursive; each call gets its own activation, and so can have its own local variable values.

In C#, this idea that functions get their own activations actually extends to blocks. When you say:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var funs = new Action<string>[5];
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        int j = i;
        {
            funs[j] = x => Console.WriteLine(j);
        }
    }
    funs[2]("foo"); // prints 2
}

That is logically just as though you'd said

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var funs = new Action<string>[5];
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        D(i, funs);
    funs[2]("foo"); // prints 2
}

static void D(int i, Action<string>[] funs)
{
    int j = i;
    {
        funs[j] = x => Console.WriteLine(j);
    }
}

Every time you go through the loop you get a brand new variable j which the lambda closes over.

I suspect that what is happening in R is that instead of getting a brand new j every time through the loop you are updating the previous j, which is not at all what C# does. That is, it seems like your R program is in fact equivalent to:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var funs = new Action<string>[5];
    int j;
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        j = i;
        {
            funs[j] = x => Console.WriteLine(j);
        }
    }
    funs[2]("foo");
}

Which prints 4, because that's the last value that j ever takes on.

See http://ericlippert.com/2009/11/12/closing-over-the-loop-variable-considered-harmful-part-one/ for more details.

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Can I say in C#, a local variable declaration space always contains its scope (scope is a subset of declaration space w.r.t. a variable), and hence any creation of new declaration space means the creation of new scope? –  colinfang Apr 26 '13 at 15:47
1  
If you care to, you can read more details about R's lexical scoping here. –  joran Apr 26 '13 at 16:00
    
@colinfang: For local variable declaration spaces there is a tight relationship between declaration space and scope. The region in which a variable may be named and the region in which nothing else may have that name are the same for local variables. That is not true in general; the scope of a protected field of class includes all subclasses, but the declaration space does not. –  Eric Lippert Apr 26 '13 at 16:02

Section 3.5 of R Language Definition describes the scoping rules for variables in R.

In section 3.5.2 it states

Every call to a function creates a frame which contains the local variables created in the function, and is evaluated in an environment, which in combination creates a new environment.

So it is (only) the calling of a function which creates a new lexical scope. Within a function, you can create additional scopes by calling other functions (and, in fact, see the help on the local() function for a function whose sole purpose is to create a new scope).

So scoping in R, unlike C++, is only at the function level, not the block level.

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I think C# way of execution is procedural. All the functions arguments are evaluated at the time of creation of list.

In R function arguments are evaluated only when the function is called for the first time. That means when funclist[[2]]('foo') is called, the for loop is already evaluated and j has last value 5.

Note: one can use force which will result in C# like behavior.

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