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This is something that I thought I should ask following this question. I'd like to confirm if this is a bug/inconsistency before filing it as a such in the R-forge tracker.

Consider this data.table:

require(data.table)
DT <- data.table(x=c(1,0,NA), y=1:3)

Now, to access all rows of the DT that are not 0, we could do it in these ways:

DT[x != 0]
#    x y
# 1: 1 1
DT[!(x == 0)]
#     x y
# 1:  1 1
# 2: NA 3

Accessing DT[x != 0] and DT[!(x==0)] gives different results when the underlying logical operation is equivalent.

Note: Converting this into a data.frame and running these operations will give results that are identical with each other for both logically equivalent operations, but that result is different from both these data.table results. For an explanation of why, look at ?`[` under the section NAs in indexing.

Edit: Since some of you've stressed for equality with data.frame, here's the snippet of the output from the same operations on data.frame:

DF <- as.data.frame(DT)
# check ?`[` under the section `NAs in indexing` as to why this happens
DF[DF$x != 0, ]
#     x  y
# 1   1  1
# NA NA NA
DF[!(DF$x == 0), ]
#     x  y
# 1   1  1
# NA NA NA

I think this is an inconsistency and both should provide the same result. But, which result? The documentation for [.data.table says:

i ---> Integer, logical or character vector, expression of column names, list or data.table.

integer and logical vectors work the same way they do in [.data.frame. Other than NAs in logical i are treated as FALSE and a single NA logical is not recycled to match the number of rows, as it is in [.data.frame.

It's clear why the results are different from what one would get from doing the same operation on a data.frame. But still, within data.table, if this is the case, then both of them should return:

#    x y
# 1: 1 1

I went through [.data.table source code and now understand as to why this is happening. See this post for a detailed explanation of why this is happening.

Briefly, x != 0 evaluates to "logical" and NA gets replaced to FALSE. However, !(x==0), first (x == 0) gets evaluated to logical and NA gets replaced to FALSE. Then the negation happens, which results in NA basically becoming TRUE.

So, my first (or rather main) question is, is this a bug/inconsistency? If so, I'll file it as one in data.table R-forge tracker. If not, I'd like to know the reason for this difference and I would like to suggest a correction to the documentation explaining this difference (to the already amazing documentation!).

Edit: Following up with comments, the second question is, should data.table's handling for subsetting by indexing with columns containing NA resemble that of data.frame?? (But I agree, following @Roland's comment that this may be very well lead to opinions and I'm perfectly fine with not answering this question at all).

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4  
My vote is for a bug, because I'd like data.table objects to behave exactly the way data.frame objects do. –  Carl Witthoft Apr 26 '13 at 15:01
2  
This question seems to ask for voting/opinions a bit to much for my taste. –  Roland Apr 26 '13 at 15:40
2  
I strongly suspect that it is deliberate, not a bug; and I would also like to see documentation/explanation for it. Now that I understand it (thanks to your explanation :) ), I sort of like the current behavior. I'll probably change my mind when I forget it and make a mistake because of it, though. To anyone who can edit: That help query can be made correct with judicious use of spaces and double-backticks: ?`[` . Also, the title is missing a ")". –  Frank Apr 26 '13 at 17:02
2  
@Arun If it is a bug or a feature seems subjective to me. It's not the only example, where a data.table behaves different to a data.frame. –  Roland Apr 26 '13 at 17:09
4  
@Roland, I think you've not fully understood/read the post. My qualms are not about the differences between data.table and data.frame per-se (I just added that point following e4e5f4 and Carl's comment). My main question is about the differences within data.table between dt[x != .] and dt[!(x==.)] When these are seemingly equivalent operations. I've made this point bold in my question now. –  Arun Apr 26 '13 at 18:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As of version 1.8.11 the ! does not trigger a not-join for logical expressions and the results for the two expressions are the same:

DT <- data.table(x=c(1,0,NA), y=1:3)
DT[x != 0]
#   x y
#1: 1 1
DT[!(x == 0)]
#   x y
#1: 1 1

A couple other expressions mentioned in @mnel's answer also behave in a more predictable fashion now:

DT[!(x != 0)]
#   x y
#1: 0 2
DT[!!(x == 0)]
#   x y
#1: 0 2
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My view is that subset does the right thing and both data.table and data.frame don't, with data.frame doing the silliest of them all. So as far as your question goes - no, I don't think data.table should do the same thing as data.frame, it should do the same thing as subset.

For the record, here's the output of subset:

subset(DF, x != 0)
#  x y
#1 1 1
subset(DF, !(x == 0))
#  x y
#1 1 1
#
# or if you want the NA's as well
subset(DF, is.na(x) | x != 0)
#   x y
#1  1 1
#3 NA 3

I want to elaborate a little bit on why data.frame output is silly. The very first line in [.data.frame description says - "Extract or replace subsets of data frames". The output that it returns, where it has a row with rowname = NA and all of the elements equal to NA are in no sense "subsets" of the given data frame, making the output inconsistent with the meaning of the function. It's also a huge hassle from the user's point of view as one has to be always aware of these things and find ways to work around this behavior.

As far as data.table output goes - it's clearly inconsistent, but at least less silly, in that in both cases it actually returns subsets of the original data table.

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@Arun putting words into why you disagree with the argument I gave will be more useful; 2nd q: use is.na –  eddi Apr 26 '13 at 15:37
    
@Arun NA is NOT not equal to 0. By definition of NA, asking if it's equal to anything (including itself) doesn't make sense, thus returning NA. –  eddi Apr 26 '13 at 15:43
    
to get all entries != 0 including NA's, you should write is.na(x) | x != 0 (and this is exactly how subset syntax works) –  eddi Apr 26 '13 at 15:47
1  
data.table is mimicing subset in its handling of NA values in logical i arguments. -- the only issue is the ! prefix signifying a not-join, not the way one might expect. Perhaps the not join prefix could have been NJ not ! to avoid this confusion -- this might be another discussion to have on the mailing list -- (I think it is a discussion worth having) –  mnel Apr 29 '13 at 23:12
    
@mnel - you mean use NJ(x == 0) instead of !(x == 0)? I'd be interested to see that discussion if you open it (not so interested in opening myself, as I don't yet see how NJ is better). –  eddi Apr 30 '13 at 15:39

I think it is documented and consistent behaviour.

The main thing to note is that the prefix ! within the i argument is a flag for a not join, so x != 0 and !(x==0) are no longer the same logical operation when working with the documented handling of NA within data.table

The section from the news regarding the not join

A new "!" prefix on i signals 'not-join' (a.k.a. 'not-where'), #1384i.
            DT[-DT["a", which=TRUE, nomatch=0]]   # old not-join idiom, still works
            DT[!"a"]                              # same result, now preferred.
            DT[!J(6),...]                         # !J == not-join
            DT[!2:3,...]                          # ! on all types of i
            DT[colA!=6L | colB!=23L,...]          # multiple vector scanning approach (slow)
            DT[!J(6L,23L)]                        # same result, faster binary search
        '!' has been used rather than '-' :
            * to match the 'not-join'/'not-where' nomenclature
            * with '-', DT[-0] would return DT rather than DT[0] and not be backwards
              compatible. With '!', DT[!0] returns DT both before (since !0 is TRUE in
              base R) and after this new feature.
            * to leave DT[+J...] and DT[-J...] available for future use

And from ?data.table

All types of 'i' may be prefixed with !. This signals a not-join or not-select should be performed. Throughout data.table documentation, where we refer to the type of 'i', we mean the type of 'i' after the '!', if present. See examples.


Why is it consistent with the documented handling of NA within data.table

NA values are considered FALSE. Think of it like doing isTRUE on each element.

so DT[x!=0] is indexed with TRUE FALSE NA which becomes TRUE FALSE FALSE due to the documented NA handling.

You are wanting to subset when things are TRUE.

This means you are getting those where x != 0 is TRUE ( and not NA)

DT[!(x==0)] uses the not join states you want everything that is not 0 (which can and will include the NA values).


follow up queries / further examples

DT[!(x!=0)]

## returns
    x y
1:  0 2
2: NA 3

x!=0 is TRUE for one value, so the not join will return what isn't true. (ie what was FALSE (actually == 0) or NA

DT[!!(x==0)]

## returns
    x y
1:  0 2
2: NA 3

This is parsed as !(!(x==0)). The prefix ! denotes a not join, and the inner !(x==0) is parsed identically to x!=0, so the reasoning from the case immediately above applies.

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mnel, thanks for the wonderful explanation. As much as I find difficult to wrap my head around the fact that !(x==.) and x != . aren't equivalent (especially without a J present, I assumed a not-join is !J(.)), your explanation makes much sense to me. One more question. So with this behaviour, what would you expect the output for DT[!!(x==0)] should be and is it the same as the expected behaviour? –  Arun Apr 27 '13 at 6:52
    
Basically, it'd be great if you could clarify how data.table interprets DT[!(x!=0)] and DT[!!(x==0)]. I've trouble interpreting it. –  Arun Apr 27 '13 at 7:12
1  
@Arun, hopefully that has cleared it up. –  mnel Apr 27 '13 at 9:23
    
+1. Very informative. I find it useful to think of the prefix ! as selecting the complement of whatever it operates on (as "complement" is a part of math lingo, while "not-join" is a completely foreign term to me). This applies to logical vectors, vectors of indices and J() as well. –  Frank Apr 27 '13 at 16:31
2  
How is this not documented? It is in the help (with the relevant section added to this answer and in the news. Using the leading ( to stop the not join from being triggered is a great way of doing so -- and perhaps could be explicitly documented as such (using () juidiciously is becoming a data.table idiom –  mnel Apr 29 '13 at 23:08

I'm a month late to this discussion, but with fresh eyes and reading all the comments ... yes I reckon DT[x != .] would be better if it included any rows with NA in x in the result, and we should change it to do that.

New answer added to the linked question with further background from a different angle :

http://stackoverflow.com/a/17008872/403310

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