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Good evening , I have a simple task two find the common numbers in two Lists. But I have one crazy mistake. I am dumbfounded, because I can't imagine what's may be wrong.

public class Test {

    public static List<Integer> same(List<Integer> a1, List<Integer> a2){

        List<Integer> lister = new ArrayList<>();

        for(int i = 0; i < a1.size() ; i++){
            for(int j = 0; j < a2.size(); j++){
                System.out.print(a1.get(i) + " vs " + a2.get(j));
                if(a1.get(i) == a2.get(j)){
                    System.out.print("equals");
                    lister.add(a2.get(j));
                }
                System.out.println();
            }
        }
        return lister;
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);

        int n = in.nextInt();

        List<Integer> list1 = new ArrayList<>();

        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            list1.add(in.nextInt());
        }

        System.out.println();
        int m = in.nextInt();

        List<Integer> list2 = new ArrayList<>();

        for (int i = 0; i < m; i++) {
            list2.add(in.nextInt());
        }

        List<Integer> result = same(list1,list2);

        System.out.println(result.size());

        in.close();

    }

}

Input :

5 13 20 22 43 146 4 13 22 43 146

Output :

13 vs 13equals
13 vs 22
13 vs 43
13 vs 146
20 vs 13
20 vs 22
20 vs 43
20 vs 146
22 vs 13
22 vs 22equals
22 vs 43
22 vs 146
43 vs 13
43 vs 22
43 vs 43equals
43 vs 146
146 vs 13
146 vs 22
146 vs 43
146 vs 146
3

So 146 != 146 . Where is my mistake ?

Thx.

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4 Answers 4

Try this example.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Integer> listOne = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6);
    List<Integer> listTwo = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3);

    Set<Integer> similar = new HashSet<Integer>(listOne);
    Set<Integer> different = new HashSet<Integer>();
    different.addAll(listOne);
    different.addAll(listTwo);

    similar.retainAll(listTwo);
    different.removeAll(similar);
    System.out.println("Similar  " + similar);
    System.out.println("Different  " + different);
}

Output:

Similar  [1, 2, 3]
Different  [4, 5, 6]
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1  
Thx, It works. But where is a mistake in my code ? Why 146 != 146 ? –  Valeriy Apr 26 '13 at 15:35

You are storing Integer objects but then comparing them with ==

Since they are reference types, the == compares object references.

Instead use if(a1.get(i).intValue() == a2.get(j).intVaue() ){

OR if(a1.get(i).equals(a2.get(j))

EDIT

@Templar has a good explanation of why the object reference comparison works for numbers below 128.

Just for clarity, here is the actual JLS that talks about it.

If the value p being boxed is true, false, a byte, or a char in the range \u0000 to \u007f, or an int or short number between -128 and 127 (inclusive), then let r1 and r2 be the results of any two boxing conversions of p. It is always the case that r1 == r2.

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Thx! I'm not thinking about .eaquals because == works for 13,22 and 43 and I thought that they compare by value. –  Valeriy Apr 26 '13 at 15:45
    
The == will work if you convert the Integer to int using intValue() –  Kal Apr 26 '13 at 15:49

This is a interesting problem. Wrapper classes like Integer or Long are saved in a pool if their values are between -128 and 128. Using the ==operator you're comparing the location of the two variables in the stack. This location is equal if they are inside the pool. If you are comparing values higher then 128 you are comparing the location of two different Integer objects. That's why you need to use the equals method.

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Like others have said, don't use == to compare object references unless you actually want to compare their locations in memory.

The main body of your method can be rewritten using Google Guava as a one-liner:

public List<Integer> same(List<Integer> list1, List<Integer> list2) {
    return Lists.newArrayList(Sets.intersection(
        ImmutableSet.copyOf(list1), ImmutableSet.copyOf(list2)));
}

It's also O(n + m) and not O(nm) to boot.

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