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I have some large Ruby structures that I need to quickly extract data from. I have no control over the format of the data, although I'm open to transforming it under certain circumstances. What is the most efficient way to extract a single item from the following hash, when using the displayName as the 'key'.

[
  {'displayName'=>'Some Key 1', 'values'=>[1,2,3]},
  {'displayName'=>'Some Key 2', 'values'=>["Some text"]},
  {'displayName'=>'Some Key 3', 'values'=>["Different text","More text"]},
  {'displayName'=>'Some Key 4', 'values'=>[2012-12-12]}
]

Each hash has other keys in it that I've removed to assist understanding.

The challenge is that in certain circumstances, the displayName field will need to be matched on a prefix sub-string. Does anybody have any practical experience knowing when to use .each and match manually, or .select to get the common case exact matches and fallback for the prefixes afterwards. Or is there some common trick I'm missing.

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not much clear about what you are looking for? –  Arup Rakshit Apr 26 '13 at 15:36
    
If I understand correctly, you want something like: hash['Some Key 1'] to return [1,2,3] right? –  Sławosz Apr 26 '13 at 15:48
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're doing this once, you'll probably just have to iterate over the set and find what you need:

row = data.find do |row|
  row['displayName'] == name
end

row && row['values']

If you're doing it more than once, you should probably make an indexed structure out of it with a simple transform to create a temporary derivative structure:

hashed = Hash[
  data.collect do |row|
    [ row['displayName'], row['values'] ]
  end
]

hashed[name]
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The requirement for a prefix match could also imply that the derivative structure is sorted for efficient search. –  Neil Slater Apr 26 '13 at 15:42
    
I think find is a decent approach, since I can vary the result of block for exact matches or prefix matches. I'm going to try a test to compare that with a variation of the derivative structure for prefixes, since I think I may be able to encode the displayName to make it into an exact match situation. I actually amazed that I hadn't used find myself in the past. This is good because it returns just what is needed, without the overhead that select does pulling potentially unnecessary data. –  Phil Apr 27 '13 at 18:23
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You can use simple select thought it may no be as fast as it could with large sized arrays:

data = [
  {'displayName'=>'Some Key 1', 'values'=>[1,2,3]},
  {'displayName'=>'Some Key 2', 'values'=>["Some text"]},
  {'displayName'=>'Some Key 3', 'values'=>["Different text","More text"]},
  {'displayName'=>'Some Key 4', 'values'=>[2012-12-12]}
]

data.select { |e| e['displayName'] == 'Some Key 2' }.first

You can group_by the desired key instead, wich will make access faster

hashed_data = data.group_by { |e| e['displayName'] }
hashed_data['Some Key 4']
=> [{"displayName"=>"Some Key 4", "values"=>[1988]}]
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Thanks for the input nicooga. I definitely think that there is something to be said for group_by for the prefix searches. +1 for that. tadman's .find is just a more direct match than .select though, and I'll need to dig into group_by to check it is not just unnecessary overhead. –  Phil Apr 27 '13 at 18:26
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