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I'm currently developing stored procedure on MySQL and I was expecting a slight gain of speed. But when I have compared my SQL request execution through a PHP script and a stored procedure, PHP was faster.

I have done it with a 1000-rows table like and and 6000-rows table like and in the first one PHP was around 10 time faster and in the second one PHP was 2 time faster.

Does the table size improveor not the procedures performances? Eventually do I make a mistake in my code and can I optimize it?

My configuration is MyIsam Databse on MySQL 5.0.10. My stored procedure is

CREATE PROCEDURE  get_task (IN var INT)
BEGIN
    DECLARE id_task INT (11);
    DECLARE job INT (11);
    DECLARE state_name VARCHAR(20);
    DECLARE task_name VARCHAR(20);
    DECLARE worker_affected INT(11);
    DECLARE user VARCHAR(10);
    DECLARE progress INT(11);
    DECLARE name VARCHAR(128);
    DECLARE phone VARCHAR(128);
    DECLARE mobile VARCHAR(128);
    DECLARE site VARCHAR(32);
    DECLARE worker_name VARCHAR(20);
    DECLARE date_time_process_started DATETIME;
    DECLARE frame INT(11);

    DECLARE curseur1 CURSOR FOR 

    SELECT tq.`id_task`, tq.`job`, lts.`state_name`, ltt.`task_name`, tq.`worker_affected`, j.`user`, tq.`progress`, u.`name`, u.`phone`, u.`mobile`, u.`site`, w .`worker_name`, tq.`date_time_process_started`, tq.`frame`
    FROM `task_queue` tq
    LEFT JOIN `workers` w ON tq.`worker_affected` = w.`id_worker`
            INNER JOIN `job` j ON tq.`job` = j.`job_id`
            INNER JOIN `user` u ON j.`user` = u.`ipn`
            INNER JOIN `list_task_type` ltt ON tq.`task_type` = ltt.`id_type_task`
            INNER JOIN `list_task_state` lts ON tq.`task_state` = lts.`id_state`
    WHERE tq.`id_task` =  var 
    ORDER BY tq.`id_task`;

    OPEN curseur1;

    FETCH curseur1 INTO id_task, job, state_name, task_name, worker_affected, user, progress, name, phone, mobile, site, worker_name, date_time_process_started, frame;
    SELECT id_task, job, state_name, task_name, worker_affected, user, progress, name, phone, mobile, site, worker_name, date_time_process_started, frame;

    CLOSE curseur1;

END |

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Do not use cursor. – Devart Apr 26 '13 at 15:43
    
if there's only one row use a SELECT INTO statement instead. – Sebas Apr 26 '13 at 18:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your stored procedure, as written, is completely unnecessary.

Not only do you not need a CURSOR to return a result set, you don't even need the procedure, just to run the single SELECT statement.

Just include the SELECT in your PHP code.

share|improve this answer

I follewed your advice and removed the CURSOR and declarations.

CREATE PROCEDURE  get_task (IN var INT)
BEGIN

SELECT tq.`id_task`, tq.`job`, lts.`state_name`, ltt.`task_name`, tq.`worker_affected`, j.`user`, tq.`progress`, u.`name`, u.`phone`, u.`mobile`, u.`site`, w .`worker_name`, tq.`date_time_process_started`, tq.`frame`
FROM `task_queue` tq
LEFT JOIN `workers` w ON tq.`worker_affected` = w.`id_worker`
        INNER JOIN `job` j ON tq.`job` = j.`job_id`
        INNER JOIN `user` u ON j.`user` = u.`ipn`
        INNER JOIN `list_task_type` ltt ON tq.`task_type` = ltt.`id_type_task`
        INNER JOIN `list_task_state` lts ON tq.`task_state` = lts.`id_state`
WHERE tq.`id_task` =  var 
ORDER BY tq.`id_task`;


END |

Indeed performances skyrocketed and now my stored procedure is only twice slower than the PHP script (0.0006 vs 0.0012 seconds against 0.0006s vs 0.009s previously).

And seeing the stored procedure's code I understand why you said it was useless, but I will keep it in order to force the database users through functions and procedures in their websites. I feel more secure like that.

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this answer
    
Encapsulating a single SELECT inside a stored procedure seems like unnecessary complexity, and overhead, unless you want to SELECT from tables the user doesn't have SELECT rights to (and you use SQL SECURITY DEFINER). – Ross Smith II May 3 '13 at 15:21

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