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I am projecting LINQ to SQL results to strongly typed classes: Parent and Child. The performance difference between these two queries is large:

Slow Query - logging from the DataContext shows that a separate call to the db is being made for each parent

var q = from p in parenttable
        select new Parent()
        {
            id = p.id,
            Children = (from c in childtable
                        where c.parentid = p.id
                        select c).ToList()
        }
return q.ToList()  //SLOW

Fast Query - logging from the DataContext shows a single db hit query that returns all required data

var q = from p in parenttable
        select new Parent()
        {
            id = p.id,
            Children = from c in childtable
                        where c.parentid = p.id
                        select c
        }
return q.ToList()  //FAST

I want to force LINQ to use the single-query style of the second example, but populate the Parent classes with their Children objects directly. otherwise, the Children property is an IQuerierable<Child> that has to be queried to expose the Child object.

The referenced questions do not appear to address my situation. using db.LoadOptions does not work. perhaps it requires the type to be a TEntity registered with the DataContext.

   DataLoadOptions options = new DataLoadOptions();
   options.LoadWith<Parent>(p => p.Children);
   db.LoadOptions = options;

Please Note: Parent and Child are simple types, not Table<TEntity> types. and there is no contextual relationship between Parent and Child. the subqueries are ad-hoc.

The Crux of the Issue: in the 2nd LINQ example I implement IQueriable statements and do not call ToList() function and for some reason LINQ knows how to generate one single query that can retrieve all the required data. How do i populate my ad-hoc projection with the actual data as is accomplished in the first query? Also, if anyone could help me better-phrase my question, I would appreciate it.

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How can Child be a "simple type"? It should be a mapped type. And is parenttable a Table or the result of a previous linq query? Some linq statements can cause L2S to switch from joining to N+1. –  Gert Arnold Apr 26 '13 at 20:09
1  
Duplicate markers: do you know the difference between entity framework and linq to sql? –  Gert Arnold Apr 27 '13 at 6:54
    
@GertArnold While the LINQ part of EF/L2S often make similar questions functionally duplicate, in this case I believe you to be entirely correct; they are not duplicates. Reopening. –  Andrew Barber Apr 29 '13 at 13:48

4 Answers 4

It's important to remember that LINQ queries rely in deferred execution. In your second query you aren't actually fetching any information about the children. You've created the queries, but you haven't actually executed them to get the results of those queries. If you were to iterate the list, and then iterate the Children collection of each item you'd see it taking as much time as the first query.

Your query is also inherently very inefficient. You're using a nested query in order to represent a Join relationship. If you use a Join instead the query will be able to be optimized appropriately by both the query provider as well as the database to execute much more quickly. You may also need to adjust the indexes on your database to improve performance. Here is how the join might look:

var q = from p in parenttable
        join child in childtable
        on p.id equals child.parentid into children
        select new Parent()
        {
            id = p.id,
            Children = children.ToList(),
        }
return q.ToList()  //SLOW
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I know the question is about LINQ to SQL, but I thought I'd mention that if you are using Entity Framework, the ToList() isn't required on children. –  Brian Cauthon Apr 29 '13 at 14:40

The fastest way I found to accomplish this is to do a query that returns all the results then group all the results. Make sure you do a .ToList() on the first query, so that the second query doesn't do many calls.

Here r should have what you want to accomplish with only a single db query.

            var q = from p in parenttable
                    join c in childtable on p.id equals c.parentid
                    select c).ToList();
            var r = q.GroupBy(x => x.parentid).Select(x => new { id = x.Key, Children=x });
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1  
Rather than doing a join and then a group by, just use a GroupJoin. –  Servy Apr 29 '13 at 14:14

You must set correct options for your data load.

options.LoadWith<Document>(d => d.Metadata);

Look at this

P.S. Include for the LINQToEntity only.

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This looks like it should be the answer, but it did not work for me. i tried dlo.LoadWith<Parent>(p => p.Children). still got multiple db hits –  Paul Apr 26 '13 at 16:10
    
@Paul You don't need to use parenttable. Have you generated entity Parent by LINQ2SQL? Then your entity contains Children already when you request Parent from context. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Apr 26 '13 at 16:44

The second query is fast precisely because Children is not being populated.

And the first one is slow just because Children is being populated.

Choose the one that fits your needs best, you simply can't have their features together!

EDIT:

As @Servy says:

In your second query you aren't actually fetching any information about the children. You've created the queries, but you haven't actually executed them to get the results of those queries. If you were to iterate the list, and then iterate the Children collection of each item you'd see it taking as much time as the first query.

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