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Are there any machine learning libraries in C#? I'm after something like WEKA. Thank you.

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closed as not constructive by Kev Jul 15 '12 at 17:28

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I disagree that this is not a constructive question. I think it's very useful to have a set of user-curated library suggestions over the automated results a google search turns up. I don't see why library suggestions can't be accompanied by "facts, references, and specific expertise" as described in the close notes. –  Ismail Degani May 14 '13 at 16:34
5  
This is a great question. Debate or not, there is a lack of knowledge on this topic on the web. –  irperez Oct 15 '13 at 17:54
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I agree, this shouldn't have been closed as not constructive. Moderator mistake in my opinion. –  Eric Brown Nov 26 '13 at 14:31
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But unfortunately, SO meets a bunch of arrogants that DEFINE what a proper question is. –  smwikipedia May 16 at 15:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 25 down vote accepted

There's a neural network library called AForge.net on the codeproject. (Code hosted at Google code) (Also checkout the AForge homepage - According to the homepage, the new version now supports genetic algorithms and machine learning as well. It looks like it's progressed a lot since I last played with it)

I don't know it's it's anything like WEKA as I've never used that.

(there's also an article on it's usage)

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Nice one. Upvoted. –  Dervin Thunk Oct 26 '09 at 10:38
    
Not bad though at least for someone not very familiar with the topic it really isn't that good a choice. They don't use partial classes for their forms (makes it hard to read the code behind their samples), and i can't find decent documentation for it. –  RCIX Oct 26 '09 at 10:58
    
@RCIX: I agree it's not exactly simple, you really need to understand neural networks and the maths behind them first. It's certainly not designed to teach NNs but rather to implement them when you know what you are doing. The docs are here - aforgenet.com/framework/docs, but yes, they do look a bit sparse. Personally, I haven't used it for several years, and it does look like it's added a lot since then so it's probably grown in complexity. –  Simon P Stevens Oct 26 '09 at 11:10

You can also use Weka with C#. The best solution is to use IKVM, as in this tutorial, although you can also use bridging software.

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What "bridging software" are you talking about? which ones? –  lmsasu Feb 16 '10 at 15:57

Weka can be used from C# very easily as Shane stated, using IKVM and some 'glue code'. Folow the tutorial on weka page to create the '.Net version' of weka, then you can try to run the following tests:

[Fact]
public void BuildAndClassify()
{
  var classifier = BuildClassifier();
  AssertCanClassify(classifier);
}

[Fact]
public void DeserializeAndClassify()
{
  BuildClassifier().Serialize("test.weka");
  var classifier = Classifier.Deserialize<LinearRegression>("test.weka");
  AssertCanClassify(classifier);
}

private static void AssertCanClassify(LinearRegression classifier)
{
  var result = classifier.Classify(-402, -1);
  Assert.InRange(result, 255.8d, 255.9d);
}

private static LinearRegression BuildClassifier()
{
  var trainingSet = new TrainingSet("attribute1", "attribute2", "class")
    .AddExample(-173, 3, -31)
    .AddExample(-901, 1, 807)
    .AddExample(-901, 1, 807)
    .AddExample(-94, -2, -86);

  return Classifier.Build<LinearRegression>(trainingSet);
}

First test shows, how you build a classifier and classify a new Example with it, the second one shows, how you can use a persisted classifier from a file to classify an example. If you need too support discrete attributes, some modification will be necessery. The code above uses 2 helper classes:

public class TrainingSet
{
    private readonly List<string> _attributes = new List<string>();
    private readonly List<List<object>> _examples = new List<List<object>>();

    public TrainingSet(params string[] attributes)
    {
      _attributes.AddRange(attributes);
    }

    public int AttributesCount
    {
      get { return _attributes.Count; }
    }

    public int ExamplesCount
    {
      get { return _examples.Count; }
    }

    public TrainingSet AddExample(params object[] example)
    {
      if (example.Length != _attributes.Count)
      {
        throw new InvalidOperationException(
          String.Format("Invalid number of elements in example. Should be {0}, was {1}.", _attributes.Count,
            _examples.Count));
      }


      _examples.Add(new List<object>(example));

      return this;
    }

    public static implicit operator Instances(TrainingSet trainingSet)
    {
      var attributes = trainingSet._attributes.Select(x => new Attribute(x)).ToArray();
      var featureVector = new FastVector(trainingSet.AttributesCount);

      foreach (var attribute in attributes)
      {
        featureVector.addElement(attribute);
      }

      var instances = new Instances("Rel", featureVector, trainingSet.ExamplesCount);
      instances.setClassIndex(trainingSet.AttributesCount - 1);

      foreach (var example in trainingSet._examples)
      {
        var instance = new Instance(trainingSet.AttributesCount);

        for (var i = 0; i < example.Count; i++)
        {
          instance.setValue(attributes[i], Convert.ToDouble(example[i]));
        }

        instances.add(instance);
      }

      return instances;
    }
}

public static class Classifier
{
    public static TClassifier Build<TClassifier>(TrainingSet trainingSet)
      where TClassifier : weka.classifiers.Classifier, new()
    {
      var classifier = new TClassifier();
      classifier.buildClassifier(trainingSet);
      return classifier;
    }

    public static TClassifier Deserialize<TClassifier>(string filename)
    {
      return (TClassifier)SerializationHelper.read(filename);
    }

    public static void Serialize(this weka.classifiers.Classifier classifier, string filename)
    {
      SerializationHelper.write(filename, classifier);
    }

    public static double Classify(this weka.classifiers.Classifier classifier, params object[] example)
    {
      // instance lenght + 1, because class variable is not included in example
      var instance = new Instance(example.Length + 1);

      for (int i = 0; i < example.Length; i++)
      {
        instance.setValue(i, Convert.ToDouble(example[i]));
      }

      return classifier.classifyInstance(instance);
    }
}
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I have created an ML library in C# that is designed to work with common POCO objects.

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I'm searching for machine learning libraries for .NET as well and found Infer.NET from Microsoft Research on nuget.org/machine-learning:

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There's also a project called Encog that has C# code. It's maintained by Jeff Heaton, the author of an "Introduction to Neural Network" book I bought a while ago. The codebase Git is here: https://github.com/encog/encog-dotnet-core

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