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I have a large MySQL database with lots of text (like '[new line]Normal') that I want to find & replace. However, I can't find it with any of the following searches, because I'm not sure what characters are used where the [new line] occurs - hence my question.

SELECT * FROM table WHERE field LIKE "%<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\nNormal%";

SELECT * FROM table WHERE field LIKE "%<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\rNormal%";

SELECT * FROM table WHERE field LIKE "%<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n\rNormal%";

SELECT * FROM table WHERE field LIKE "%<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\r\nNormal%";

Thanks for any help you can give...

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Please paste the result of SELECT field FROM table WHERE field LIKE "%<!--[if gte mso 9]" LIMIT 10; –  Vinko Vrsalovic Oct 26 '09 at 10:44
    
Do you really need the text following <xml> in those searches? Would it work if you stopped at "[if gte mso 9]" ? –  pavium Oct 26 '09 at 10:46
    
Vinko, here's the start of the first 2 fields that match that query (they're long): 0 false false false </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if !mso]> <object classid="clsid:38481807-CA0E-42D2-BF39-B33AF135CC4D" id=ieooui> </object> <style> st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } </style> <![endif]--><style> & <p> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> 72 544x376 </xml><![endif]--> 0 false false false </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> </xml><![endif]--><style> –  tog22 Oct 26 '09 at 10:53
    
sorry, returns in that comment didn't come out properly - the 2 results are separated by the '&' in the penultimate line (at least in my browser) –  tog22 Oct 26 '09 at 10:54

3 Answers 3

You might have end of lines as CR/LF i.e. #13#10 (Dos/Windows convention) or just LF - #10 (Unix convention)

Make sure any occurrence of the first is converted into the second:

UPDATE TABLE
SET field = REPLACE( field, CONCAT(CHAR(13),CHAR(10)), CHAR(10) )

just to be safe you can also do:

UPDATE TABLE
SET field = REPLACE( field, CHAR(13), CHAR(10) )

Now any "End of line" character will be #10 (Line Feed)

If you wish, you can do something like:

UPDATE TABLE
SET field = REPLACE( field, CHAR(10), '[LF]' )
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presumably you mean: UPDATE TABLE SET field = REPLACE( field, CHAR(13), CHAR(10) ); ? –  tog22 Oct 26 '09 at 11:57
    
OK, that seems to have worked though its double spaced my fields (strangely - any idea why?) - I'm still having a little difficulty finding the fields with a SELECT even now I'm using \n but will report back.. –  tog22 Oct 26 '09 at 15:31
    
Running UPDATE TABLE SET field = REPLACE( field, CONCAT(CHAR(13),CHAR(10)), CHAR(10) ) has deleted all the zeros in my fields! –  tog22 Nov 5 '09 at 13:32

You shouldn't need to update any rows to use this query.

You actually have two options - you can use the CHAR(10)/CHAR(13) approach, as others have noted, or you can actually send a query with a literal newline in it, like so:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE field LIKE "%<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
Normal%";

To run this query without needing to use literal newlines:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE field LIKE CONCAT("%<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>", CHAR(13), CHAR(10), "Normal%");
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In a more general sense, "hidden" characters can be typed easily on the terminal, at least on UNIX-based systems, using Ctrl+v. If you hit Ctrl+v, the next character you type will be printed literally to the terminal instead of interpreted by any of the intervening systems. Using this, you can just type into whatever you're using and search for newlines, tabs, or anything else the terminal eats.

Won't work if you're on a Windows system, but this tip might help someone out who has a similar problem and doesn't have access to CHAR() functions.

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