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I'm new to multithreading and having a problem with threads and locking in my program.

I have simplified my problem by creating the code below

private final ConcurrentLinkedQueue<String> valueQueue = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue<String>();
private final Object lock = new Lock();
private ProcessValue processor = new ProcessValues();

public void addValue(String value){
        synchronized (lock) {
        valueQueue.add(value);
        lock.notify();
    }
}

public void waitForValuesToBeAdded(){
        synchronized (lock) {
        lock.wait();
        executeValues();
    }
}

public void executeValues(){
        synchronized (lock) {
        processor.processValues();
        valueQueue.clear();
        lock.notify()
    }
}

When the program starts it executes waitForValuesToBeAdded. As the name suggests this just waits for values to be added to the queue. When values are added we no longer wait and so executeValues() is called.

When processor.processValues() is executing I don't want values to be added to the Queue (valueQueue.add(value)). I need them to wait until processValues() has finished. I thought if I use a synchronized block it will block the insertion but when I add another value while processValue is executing everything hangs.

Have I missed something in my program?

share|improve this question
    
The purpose of a synchronized block is to prevent two callers from entering the synchronized code code block at the same time. The second caller will be blocked until the first caller has exited the block. This prevents the second caller from corrupting the state (variables) being read or written by the first caller. Concurrent collections are safe without such locking; if you are forcing other callers to wait, what do you need a ConcurrentLinkedQueue for? –  Robert Harvey Apr 26 '13 at 18:07
    
Can you show us some action? where are the above methods called? –  dcernahoschi Apr 26 '13 at 18:23
1  
If the queue only ever holds one object at a time, then you may want to use a SynchronousQueue instead –  Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot Apr 26 '13 at 18:25
    
@RobertHarvey The reason I put the lock was to block anything getting added to the queue and force the thread to wait until they can –  Decrypter Apr 26 '13 at 20:58
    
Show me the main program, where you are creating an instance of the class etc. –  xagyg May 15 '13 at 13:15

2 Answers 2

Try using jvisualvm to see where threads are blocked. You can do a "thread dump" to analize this.

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Rewrite as follows:

private final ConcurrentLinkedQueue<String> valueQueue = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue<String>();
private final Object lock = new Lock();
private ProcessValue processor = new ProcessValues();

public void addValue(String value) {
    synchronized (lock) {
        valueQueue.add(value);
        lock.notifyAll();
    }
}

public void waitForValuesToBeAdded() throws InterruptedException {
    synchronized (lock) {
        while (valueQueue.size() == 0) {
            lock.wait();
        }
        executeValues();
    }
}

public void executeValues() {
    synchronized (lock) {
        processor.processValues();
        valueQueue.clear();
        lock.notifyAll()
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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