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I am creating a function which overloads the + operator when two objects in my Student class are overloaded. The function should add their ages and heights (two protected data fields of the class). It then calls the constructor to create a new Student with these fields. It is also an exercise in templates, so those fields cannot be removed.

When I compile my program, I get a segmentation fault at runtime. Using cout statements, I can see that the new Student is being created and the constructor is exited, but then the segmentation fault occurs. I realize this must be a memory issue, but I can't figure out a solution. I have tried using dynamic memory to create the new student in both the overloaded operator and the main function, but the error persists.

Here is the constructor:

template <typename T>
Student<T>::Student(int age, int height)
{
    this->age = age;
    this->height = height;

    cout << "New student created"<< endl;
    return;
}  

Here is the overloaded operator function:

template<typename T>
Student<T> Student<T>::operator+(Student<T> &secondStudent) const
{
    int a = age + secondStudent.getAge();
    int h = height + secondStudent.getHeight();

    new Student(a, h);
}

here is the main function:

Student<int> *s2 = new Student<int>(15, 63);
Student<int> *s3 = new Student<int>(18, 72);

Student <int> s4 = (*s2+ *s3);
cout << "did it return?" << endl;

Note that the two cout statements are printing, so I know the operator is invoked and the student is created, but then the memory problem is encountered.

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1  
Turn on your compiler's warnings. Also note that you should almost never use new and delete in C++, even less once make_unique arrives. –  chris Apr 26 '13 at 18:40
1  
Not what you asked about but please drop the pointers Student<int> s2(15, 63); Student<int> s3(18, 72); Student<int> s4 = s2 + s3;. Programming is so much easier without them. –  john Apr 26 '13 at 18:53
    
You seem to be poorly transliterating programming practices from Java into C++. In C++ you should rarely use the new keyword. –  Charles Salvia Apr 26 '13 at 18:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your operator + overload doesn't return anything (you have no return statement), so you are getting undefined behavior (the cause of your Segmentation Fault). Also, your operator + function causes a memory leak for no reason by ignoring the return value of new. There's no reason to even use new here. You want to say:

template<typename T>
Student<T> Student<T>::operator+(Student<T> &secondStudent) const
{
    int a = age + secondStudent.getAge();
    int h = height + secondStudent.getHeight();

    return Student(a, h);
}

You don't need to use the new keyword in C++ unless you have a specific reason to allocate something on the heap. (new returns a pointer to a dynamically allocated object.) In your case, you just want to create and return a Student object.

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Gah, thank you.... I got a bit lost among all the template tags and momentarily forgot that functions should specify what it is they're returning... –  JesseP_613 Apr 26 '13 at 18:44

The problem is here:

template<typename T>
Student<T> Student<T>::operator+(Student<T> &secondStudent) const
{
    int a = age + secondStudent.getAge();
    int h = height + secondStudent.getHeight();

    new Student(a, h);
//  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
}

You are creating an object dynamically, but there is no return statement in your function. This is undefined behavior (besides, you are also leaking that object, since there is no corresponding call to delete). Instead, you could write:

template<typename T>
Student<T> Student<T>::operator+(Student<T> &secondStudent) const
{
    int a = age + secondStudent.getAge();
    int h = height + secondStudent.getHeight();

    return Student(a, h);
//  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
}

Notice, that manual memory management through raw pointers, new, and delete is usually a bad idea. If you really need reference semantics, consider using smart pointers instead.

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