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How do I write this idea in CSS:

Select every element inside ElementA that is not inside ElementB where ElementB is inside ElementA.

Here is an example:

<table id="ElementA">
    <tr>
        <td>
            <p>Paragraph One</p>
        </td>
        <td class="ElementB">
            <p>Paragraph Two</p>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

Try to turn the text "Paragraph One" to "color: red" without changing the color of Paragraph Two.

I tried:

#ElementA *:not(.ElementB *) {
    color: #ff0000;
}

This is not homework; Twitter Bootstrap is messing with google maps by changing the max-width and line-height properties of the controls on the map. I want bootstrap to apply to the info window (which when open is inside the element) but not the zoom control or distance scale.

Edit 1: the better example for how your solution will be used is probably this:

<div id="ElementA">
    <div>
        <p>Paragraph One</p>
    </div>
    <div class="ElementB">
        <div>
            <p>Paragraph Two</p>
            <h1>text</h1>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

Goal: apply css properties to every element in ElementA except any element in ElementB.

share|improve this question

You can use

#ElementA td:not(.ElementB)  p{
    color: #ff0000;
}

fiddle here

New example. With divs and sort of different structure

Now , for the new example you posted afterwards, you can use this other solution. Very similar

For

<div id="ElementA">
    <div>
        <p>Paragraph One</p>
    </div>
    <div class="ElementB">
        <div>
            <p>Paragraph Two</p>
            <h1>text</h1>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

use

 #ElementA >div:not(.ElementB)  {
    color: #ff0000;
}

or if you want to be more specific

#ElementA >div:not(.ElementB) p {
        color: #ff0000;
    }

both will work!

corresponding fiddle here

Remember: The not selector will work work as expected with compound selectors inside its parenthesis

share|improve this answer
    
This did work for the example however my real application is more like: '<div id="ElementA"> <div> <p>Paragraph One</p> </div> <div class="ElementB"> <div> <p>Paragraph Two</p> <h1>text</h1> </div> </div> </div>' and the equivalent '#ElementA div:not(.ElementB) * {}' doesn't work in my code. – Xion Dark Apr 26 '13 at 19:31
    
Hey there! You changed your example. Ok here it goes... – Fico Apr 26 '13 at 20:26
    
In answer to your comment under my answer, take a look at your second fiddle with a non-inherited property set (your original has just color set which is inherited). The border does not propagate to the p of paragraph one (it is only on the div surrounding it). The requirements of the question stated that the properties had to apply to "every element in ElementA" except those in "ElementB". – ScottS Apr 26 '13 at 22:27
    
@ScottS Thank you, I appreciate your comment . – Fico Apr 27 '13 at 12:21

I believe this can only be done if .ElementB is a known (set) depth from #ElementA. In your case here, the answer would be this:

#ElementA > :not(.ElementB),
#ElementA > :not(.ElementB) * {
    /* styles to apply */
}

See fiddle example.

If you intend .ElementB itself to also have the styles applied, then you have some other issues with inherited css (unless you don't mind that default behavior). You would have to reset properties that inherit by default if you don't want them to change:

#ElementA > *,
#ElementA > :not(.ElementB) * {
    border: 1px solid red;
    color: blue;
}

#ElementA > .ElementB * {
    color: black;
}

See fiddle example.

share|improve this answer
    
Both examples I developed in my answer works fine in my fiddles. I dont see where can be the trouble? – Fico Apr 26 '13 at 20:57
    
@Fico: Your answer relies on .ElementB being a child of .ElementA and not being nested at an arbitrary depth. – BoltClock Apr 27 '13 at 0:50
    
@BoltClock: My answer also relies on knowing the relation between the elements. Arbitrary depth is not stated as a requirement in the question. (However, because of an earlier question that did ask that, I made sure to note in this answer that the position of relation between .ElementB and .ElementA had to be known to make it work.) – ScottS Apr 27 '13 at 10:52
    
@ScottS: Good call. – BoltClock Apr 27 '13 at 11:03

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