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I want to compare values from two variables (dictionary and list). Dictionary has a nested construct, so I have to loop over the all items. I discovered simple solution, but I am pretty sure that I can do this in a better way (using python). In a brief I want to find items from user_from_database which are not existing in a user_from_client variable.

My solution:

#variable containing users from client side
users_from_client = {
  "0": {
    "COL1": "whatever",
    "COL2": "val1",
    "COL3": "whatever",
  },
  "1": {
    "COL1": "whatever",
    "COL2": "val2",
    "COL3": "whatever",
  },
  "3": {
    "COL1": "whatever",
    "COL2": "val3",
    "COL3": "whatever",
  }    
} 

#variable containing users from the database
users_from_database = [
  ["val1"],
  ["val2"],
  ["val5"],
  ["val7"]
]

#This function is used to find element from the nested dictionaries(d)
def _check(element, d, pattern = 'COL2'):
  exist = False
  for k, user in d.iteritems():
    for key, item in user.iteritems():
      if key == pattern and item == element:
        exist = True
  return exist

#Finding which users should be removed from the database  
to_remove = []
for user in users_from_db:
  if not _check(user[0], users_from_agent):
    if user[0] not in to_remove:
      to_remove.append(user[0])

#to_remove list contains: [val5, val7"] 

What is the better way to give the same result using python approach ? Probably I don't have to add that I'm a newbie with python (I assume that you are able to see that watching the code above).

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1  
Why are you enclosing each "val" in it's own list in users_from_database? –  Joel Cornett Apr 26 '13 at 19:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just use an error-safe dictionary lookup:

def _check(element, d, pattern = 'COL2'):
    for user in d.itervalues():
        if user.get(pattern) == element:
            return True
    return False

Or as a one liner:

def _check(element, d, pattern = 'COL2'):
    return any(user.get(pattern) == element for user in d.itervalues())

Or trying to do the entire job as a one-liner:

#Finding which users should be removed from the database  
to_remove = set(
    name
    for name in users_from_database.itervalues()
    if not any(user.get('COL2') == name for (user,) in users_from_client)
)

assert to_remove == {"val5", "val7"}

sets can make it ever more concise (and efficient):

to_remove = set(
    user for (user,) in users_from_database
) - set(
    user.get('COL2') for user in users_from_client
)

Your data structures are a bit wierd. Consider using:

users_from_client = [
  {
    "COL1": "whatever",
    "COL2": "val1",
    "COL3": "whatever",
  }, {
    "COL1": "whatever",
    "COL2": "val2",
    "COL3": "whatever",
  }, {
    "COL1": "whatever",
    "COL2": "val3",
    "COL3": "whatever",   
  }
] 

#variable containing users from the database
users_from_database = set(
  "val1",
  "val2",
  "val5",
  "val7"
)

Which reduces your code to:

to_remove = users_from_database - set(
    user.get('COL2') for user in users_from_client
)
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this requires you to make sure that None is not a valid dictionary value. –  Antimony Apr 26 '13 at 19:49
    
To be honest, it might make more sense to just let the KeyError be thrown. As a hack, you could use user.get('COL2', float('nan')) –  Eric Apr 26 '13 at 19:51
    
I know that it doesn't look good, but unfortunately I get this structure from one function. Of course I can add one more iteration for removing unnecessary list, but I don't see any sense of that approach (one more iteration...) –  user1119698 Apr 26 '13 at 19:53
    
@user1119698: Can you rewrite that function? Also, iterations don't have to happen sequentially - they can happen in parallel –  Eric Apr 26 '13 at 19:54
    
@user1119698: I've updated my one-liners to work with the original data structure –  Eric Apr 26 '13 at 20:01

Well I don't know of any super elegant way to do this, but there are some minor improvements you can make to your code.

First off, you aren't using k, so you might as well iterate over just the values. Second, you don't need to keep track of exists, you can just return immediately when you find a match. Lastly, if you're checking for a key,value pair, you can just test if the tuple is contained in items.

def _check(element, d, pattern = 'COL2'):
  for user in d.itervalues():
    if (pattern, element) in user.items():
      return True
  return False
share|improve this answer
    
Thx, your code looks much better than mine. Comparision of tuples is great! –  user1119698 Apr 26 '13 at 19:43

You can create inverted dict for fast lookup and place it in cache for example..

>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> 
>>> users_inverted = defaultdict(list)
>>> for pk, user in users_from_client.iteritems():
...  for key in user.iteritems():
...   users_inverted[key].append(int(pk))
... 
>>> users_inverted
defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {('COL3', 'whatever'): [1, 0, 3], ('COL2', 'val1'): [0], ('COL1', 'whatever'): [1, 0, 3], ('COL2', 'val2'): [1], ('COL2', 'val3'): [3]})

and then lookup for users will be very fast:

>>> def _check(element, pattern = 'COL2'):
...  return bool(users_inverted[(pattern, element)])
>>> 
>>> _check('whatever', 'COL3')
True
>>> _check('whatever', 'COL333')
False

and as a plus besides speed you get a list of users for each attributes pair

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