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I'm trying to read a paragraph of text into a string vector, then create dictionary keeping count of the number of occurrences for each word. So far,it only loads the first word of text, and I'm not sure how to proceed. I know I'm a a little unclear of how to properly use these member functions.

int main()
    {
        ifstream input1;
        input1.open("Base_text.txt");

    vector<string> base_file;
    vector<int> base_count;


    if (input1.fail())
    {
        cout<<"Input file 1 opening failed."<<endl;
        exit(1);
    }

    make_dictionary(input1, base_file, base_count);


}

void make_dictionary(istream& file, vector<string>& words, vector<int>& count)
{


    string line;


    while (file>>line)
    {
        words.push_back(line);
    }

    cout<<words[0];



}

Expected output:

This is some simple base text to use for comparison with other files.
You may use your own if you so choose; your program shouldn't actually care.
For getting interesting results, longer passages of text may be useful.
In theory, a full novel might work, although it will likely be somewhat slow.

Actual output:

This 
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4 Answers 4

I guess you'll have to move cout << words[0] inside the loop, otherwise it only gets called once when the loop ends. That'll only print the first word every iteration, though. So, print the last word each time:

while (file>>line)
{
     words.push_back(line);
     cout<<words.back(); // or cout << line, same thing really
}

Last thing - while(file >> line) will read word by word, not line by line as the name of the variable suggests. If you want that, use while (getline(file, line)).

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Any ideas as to how I would proceed to keep track of each word's number of occurrences? –  iamthewalrus Apr 26 '13 at 19:50

Reading the word-content from a text-file into a string vector is fairly straight-forward. The code below assumes the filename being parsed is the first command-line argument.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <map>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    if (argc < 2)
        return EXIT_FAILURE;

    // open file and read all words into the vector.
    ifstream inf(argv[1]);
    istream_iterator<string> inf_it(inf), inf_eof;
    vector<string> words(inf_it, inf_eof);

    // for populating a word-count dictionary:
    map<string, unsigned int> dict;
    for (auto &it : words)
        ++dict[it];

    // print the dictionary
    for (auto &it : dict)
        cout << it.first << ':' << it.second << endl;

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

However, you should (could) combined both operations into a single loop and avoid the intermediate vector entirely:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    if (argc < 2)
        return EXIT_FAILURE;

    // open file and read all words into the vector.
    ifstream inf(argv[1]);
    map<string, unsigned int> dict;
    string str;
    while (inf >> str)
        ++dict[str];

    // print the dictionary
    for (auto &it : dict)
        cout << it.first << ':' << it.second << endl;

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Sorting it in highest to lowest occurrence is not quite as trivial, but doable with an sort-bed vector and std::sort(). Further, striping leading and trailing non-alphabetic characters (punctuation) is also an enhancement. Another would be reducing the words to all-lower-case before insertion into the map. This allows Ball and ball to occupy a single dictionary slot with a count of 2.

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Well, you print only the first word: (The idea ist to show you why yuo have to love STL)

cout<<words[0];

You could

for(string& word : words)             cout<<word;

or

for(size_t i=0; i<words.size(); ++i)  cout<<words[i];

To print all of then. A very simple solution to count the words is to use a map in place of vector:

map<string,size_t> words;
...
string word;
while (file>>word)           ++words[word];
...
for(const auto& w : words)  cout<<endl<<w.first<<":"<<w.second;

WhozCraig proposed a challenge. To order the word by frequency:

multimap<int,string,greater<int>> byFreq;
for(const auto& w : words)  byFreq.insert( make_pair(w.second, w.first));
for(const auto& w : byFreq) cout<<endl<<w.second <<":"<<w.first;

All will (ideone):

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <functional> 
#include <utility>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;

int main() 
{
   map<string,size_t> words;
   string word;

   while (cin>>word)  
   { 
       for(char&c:word)c=tolower(c);
       ++words[word];
   }
   cout<<"  ----- By word: ------" ;
   for(const auto& w : words)  cout<<endl<<w.first<<":"<<w.second;
   cout<<endl<<endl<<" ----- By frequency: ------";
   multimap<size_t,string,greater<int>> byFreq;
   for(const auto& w : words)  byFreq.insert( make_pair(w.second, w.first) );
   for(const auto& w : byFreq) cout<<endl<<w.second <<":"<<w.first;
   return 0;
}
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Any ideas as to how I would proceed to keep track of each word's number of occurrences? –  iamthewalrus Apr 26 '13 at 19:46
1  
@AndyMiller, A map, perhaps? –  chris Apr 26 '13 at 19:46
    
@WhozCraig proposed a challenge. To order the word by frequency: –  qPCR4vir Apr 27 '13 at 21:01

I have the following implementation which attempts to convert the words to lowercase and remove punctuation.

#include<iostream>
#include<iterator>
#include<algorithm>
#include<fstream>
#include<string>
#include<unordered_map>

int main() {
  std::vector<std::string> words;
  {
    std::ifstream fp("file.txt", std::ios::in);
    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(fp),
              std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
              std::back_insert_iterator<std::vector<std::string>>(words));
  }

  std::unordered_map<std::string, int> frequency;
  for(auto it=words.begin(); it!=words.end(); ++it) {
    std::string word;
    std::copy_if(it->begin(), it->end(),
                 std::back_insert_iterator<std::string>(word), ::isalpha);
    std::transform(word.begin(), word.end(), word.begin(), ::tolower);
    frequency[word]++;
  }

  for(auto p:frequency) {
    std::cout<<p.first<<" => "<<p.second<<std::endl;
  }
  return 0;
}

If file.txt has the following contents:

hello hello hello bye BYE dog DOG' dog.

word Word worD w'ord

The program will produce:

word => 4
dog => 3
bye => 2
hello => 3
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