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I have a for-loop, like the following:

for inf from $filelist; do
  for ((i=0; i<imax; ++i)); do
    temp=`<command_1> $inf | <command_2>`
    eval set -A array -- $temp
    ...
  done 
  ...
done

Problem is, command_1 a bit time consuming and its output is a bit large (900MB is the highest, depending on how big the input file is). So, I modified the script to:

outf="./temp"
for inf from $filelist; do
  <command_1> $inf -o $outf
  for ((i=0; i<imax; ++i)); do
    temp=`cat $outf | <command_2>`
    eval set -A array -- $temp
    ...
  done 
  ...
done

There is a little performance improvement, but not so much as I want, probably because disk I/O is a performance bottle-neck as well.

Just curious if there is a way to save the stdout output of command_1, so that I could reuse it without saving it to a physical disk file?

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This really depends on how much data command_2 produces, and how much it needs from command_1. –  Henk Langeveld Apr 26 '13 at 21:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

don't use pipelines inside nested loops

Based on new comments and another look at the original question, I would strongly recommend against using a pipeline processing large amounts of data inside a nested loop. Shell pipelines are far from efficient, and incur lots of process overhead.

Look at the original problem, this involves looking into the contributions of command_1 and command_2, and see if you could solve this in another way.

That said: here's the original answer:

In the shell there are two ways of storing data: either in a shell variable, or in a file. You might try to store that file in a memory based filesystem, like /dev/shm on linux or tmpfs in Solaris.

You might also analyse command_1 and command_2 for optimisations. Is there anything in the output of command_1 that's not needed by command_2? Try to put a filter between the two.

Example:

command_1 | awk '{ print $2 }' | command_2

(Assuming command_2 only needs column 2 of command_1's output.)

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Good idea, Henk! Yes, in each loop iteration, only the i-th column is needed. But how to embedded this awk statement into the for-loop? I tried command_1 | awk '{ print $$i }' | command_2 (in a for-loop), but it doesn't work. Any suggestions here? –  Qiang Xu Apr 26 '13 at 21:55
    
Try ... | awk -v i=$i '{ print $i }' | ... or ... | cut -f$i | .... However, it looks like you could use a solution based on pure awk/perl/python/..., without all the process overhead. –  Henk Langeveld Apr 30 '13 at 12:56

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