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I have this

public int CityId { get; set; }

and

public int CityId;

If I use first - it works in EF code first while the second - doesn't. But if I definte {get; set;} and do nothing else, what is the exact difference between a simple definition? I understand that I can add some additional/customized code to {get; set;} layout, but doesn't it work exactly the same if without {get; set;}?

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1  
The latter is a field, the former is a property. –  vcsjones Apr 26 '13 at 20:20
    
Long term, properties provide additional benefits (like the ability to declare as virtual, abstract, or in interfaces). Sometimes significantly, even though the calling/usage code may be identical (assigning/getting values to/from look like the same C# syntax), it is a breaking change to switch. Third-parties leveraging your code must recompile their code to match the change. If they simply replace the compiled DLLs without recompiling, they will receive runtime errors. –  Chris Sinclair Apr 26 '13 at 20:37
    
I can't speak for EF, but my past experience with NHibernate required the members to be properties (maybe even virtual? Maybe just for lazily-loading bags/collections) because it would compile subclasses on-the-fly which would override/implement the property behaviour to lazily load data from the database. Such behaviour is (likely) impossible with fields. –  Chris Sinclair Apr 26 '13 at 20:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
public int CityId;

This is a field.

public int CityId { get; set; }

This is a property, and the compiler will generate a private field for you automatically to back the property.

They are two different things. A property provides a getter, a setter, or both. The "get" and "set" operations on properties are compiled as method calls.

A field is just an exposed variable. It is generally considered bad practice for fields to be public.

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It is generally considered bad practice for properties to be public. - did you mean variables instead of properties OR, if not, can you please explain why? –  Andrius Naruševičius Apr 26 '13 at 20:27
1  
I meant fields, not properties. That's the second obvious and terrible mistake I've made today in SO answers... –  cdhowie Apr 26 '13 at 20:39
    
Don't worry :)) You were very helpful :)) –  Andrius Naruševičius Apr 26 '13 at 20:47

With this syntax:

public int CityId { get; set; }

you're actually creating an auto-implemented property and behind the scenes it gets translated to this:

private int _CityId;
public int CityId { 
    get
    {
        return _CityId;
    } 
    set
    {
        _CityId = value;
    }
}

This syntax:

public int CityId;

is just a field

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The difference you are looking for is called encapsulation.

example

In your example is not a big difference between the field and the property. The field got a better performance than the property because it doesn't need to call a method to access it. Anyway the disadvantages of a field is that everyone can access it and you (the class holding the field) don't have any control about it.

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I think your answer explains my question as a comment on cdhowie's answer! Thanks! –  Andrius Naruševičius Apr 26 '13 at 20:32

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