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I am programming a Network singleton class and it needs to run in a thread, so far no problem, however I cannot get it work sadly.

Network class:

public class Network extends Thread {    
    private static Network cachedInstance = new Network();

    private PrintWriter out;
    private BufferedReader in;

    private Network() {        
    }

    private void init() {
        try {
            Socket clientSocket = new Socket(Config.HOST_NAME, Config.HOST_PORT);
            out = new PrintWriter(clientSocket.getOutputStream(), true);
            in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(clientSocket.getInputStream()));

            String fromServer;
            while ((fromServer = in.readLine()) != null) {
                System.out.println("Server: " + fromServer);
            }

        } catch (IOException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Controller.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
    }

    public static Network getInstance() {
        return cachedInstance;
    }

    public void send(final String string) {
        out.println(string);
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        init();
    }
}

Part of Controller class:

public void clientTest() {
    int random = new Random().nextInt(1000);
    Network.getInstance().start();
    Network.getInstance().send(random + "");
}

The error I am getting:

Exception in thread "AWT-EventQueue-0" java.lang.NullPointerException
at network.Network.send(Network.java:52)
at controller.Controller.clientTest(Controller.java:126)

So it is looking like the single Network instance is not instantiated properly, which theoretically shouldn't be possible.

A second question I have is if I can avoid using this:

Network.getInstance().start();

In other words I would want to ensure that only one thread (Network class) is created and that it is always running by default when the classes are initialized. It is not bad in the current way but I just figured it would be nicer.

For people wondering why I use this approach: Basically I only want to use Network.send() to send to a fixed server. That server can of course send stuff back aswell, but upon that Network needs to react and invoke methods from the Controller at some point.

Regards.

EDIT: Proposed Solution, based on reactions

Network.class:

public class Network implements Runnable {    
    private static final Network cachedInstance;
    static {
        Network tempInstance = null;
        try {
            tempInstance = new Network(Config.HOST_NAME, Config.HOST_PORT);
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Network.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        } finally {
            cachedInstance = tempInstance;
        }
    }

    private final Socket clientSocket;
    private final PrintWriter out;
    private final BufferedReader in;

    private Network(final String hostname, final int port) throws IOException {
        clientSocket = new Socket(hostname, port);
        out = new PrintWriter(clientSocket.getOutputStream(), true);        
        in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(clientSocket.getInputStream()));
    }

    public static Network getInstance() {
        return cachedInstance;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            String fromServer;
            while ((fromServer = in.readLine()) != null) {
                System.out.println("Server: " + fromServer);
            }
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Network.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
    }

    public void send(final String string) {
        out.println(string);
    }

    public void close() {
        try {
            in.close();
            out.close();
            clientSocket.close();
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Network.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
    }
}

Calling code:

public void clientTest() {
    int random = new Random().nextInt(1000);
    Network network = Network.getInstance();
    new Thread(network).start();
    network.send(random + "");
    network.close();
}

This is just for testing, in reality the connection needs to stay open until the user closes the program.

share|improve this question
    
You are calling send before out is being set. BTW You need to make the field out a volatile field, or you might never see it being set. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 26 '13 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A simple solution to the problem is to have the connect established before you start the thread so you don't have this race condition to worry about.

public class Network implements Runnable, Closeable {    
    private final Socket clientSocket;
    private final PrintWriter out;
    private final BufferedReader in;
    private volatile boolean closed = false;

    public Network(String hostname, int port) throws IOException {        
        clientSocket = new Socket(hostname, port);
        out = new PrintWriter(clientSocket.getOutputStream(), true);
        in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(clientSocket.getInputStream()));
    }

    public void run() {
        try {
            for(String fromServer; (fromServer = in.readLine()) != null;) 
                System.out.println("Server: " + fromServer);
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            if (!closed)
                Logger.getLogger(Controller.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
    }

    public void send(String line) {
        out.println(line);
    }

    public void close() {
        closed = true;
        try { clientSocket.close(); } catch (IOException ignored) { }
    }
}

For testing

@Test
public void testClient() {
    Network network = new Network(Config.HOSTNAME, Config.PORT)
    new Thread(network).start();

    int random = new Random().nextInt(1000);
    network.send(random + "");
    network.close();
}

Note: using stateful singleton classes make unit testing very difficult because you have to reset the singleton back to it's initial state or one test can impact another and the order you run can make a difference. In the test above, it is self contained, and no other test is harmed. ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you a lot! I had given up hopes on this question actually already. I'll test it right now but it should definately work. –  skiwi Apr 27 '13 at 10:42
    
One question though: Why does the constructor throw IOException? Doesn't that mean that the caller of this code needs to do exception handling? Which in my opinion is annoying, as the class itself (Network here) could also do it itself? –  skiwi Apr 27 '13 at 10:45
    
It can do the exception handling but usually only the caller know what should be done. In any case you don't want to create a Network which is actually not connected to anything. i.e. dead object. What do you want it to do if the socket cannot connect? –  Peter Lawrey Apr 27 '13 at 10:51
    
I made a proposed solution which includes it being Singleton, could you be so kind to check it? :) I am sorry if I haven't 100% follow your guidelines though. –  skiwi Apr 27 '13 at 10:57
    
It is better and it solve the race condition. Note: if you attempt to use the Network after it has failed to connect, you will get a NullPointerException. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 27 '13 at 11:27

When you call start() on a thread, a period of time goes by before the thread is actually running. You're calling send() before run() is called, and therefore before out is initialized. Don't do this. Wait for a message from the running thread, and only then is it safe to call send(). You could use wait() and notify() on a simple Object to do this.

As far as avoiding having the client call start() -- sure, call start() from Network's constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
"Wait for a message from the running thread" Could you possibly explain me more about this? How would I wait for that message? –  skiwi Apr 26 '13 at 20:38

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