Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't know if my title is quite specific, but my problem is that I want to wait 1 sec (1000 ms) to perform an action that is on a method. I haven't used a Timer before, but I see that you do something like:

aTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimedEvent);

And then you define your OnTimedEvent method:

private static void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The Elapsed event was raised at {0}", e.SignalTime);
}

The point is that the method I wanna call receives 5 arguments, and all the examples I've seen use the object source, ElapsedEventArgs e thing. I wanna know how to call a method and send it's arguments after 1 sec is elapsed. Thank you very much!

share|improve this question
    
Can you use, or are you using, .NET 4.5? It has new async features that could come in handy here. –  Tim S. Apr 26 '13 at 21:57
add comment

4 Answers

Create a small helper class, with

  • fields for the 5 arguments and your final delegate
  • a single method of the timer delegate prototype, that calls your final delegate with your 5 arguments (all present in the instance)

Now instantiate it, assign the parameters and set the wrapper method as your timer delegate.

share|improve this answer
add comment

And the problem is...

private static void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The Elapsed event was raised at {0}", e.SignalTime);
    MyMethod(par1, par2, parn..);
}
share|improve this answer
    
And how do par1... come in there? –  Eugen Rieck Apr 26 '13 at 21:27
    
Well, I can't tell, you're the software architect here, I don't know! :-) You asked how to call a method.. Normally you use members in the same class to hold those values. –  Oscar Apr 26 '13 at 21:30
    
The OQ was in essence, how to pass 5 parameters to a timer delegate. –  Eugen Rieck Apr 26 '13 at 21:32
    
Wich timer? Windows.Forms.Timer? Just create five variables in the form hosting the timer, assign them some values and call your method. I don't see the problem. –  Oscar Apr 26 '13 at 21:34
    
I personally consider it extremly bad style to use something like a form-global variable for such a task. It also breaks catastrophically in a multithreaded environment. –  Eugen Rieck Apr 26 '13 at 21:37
show 1 more comment

Have you thought about extending the timer to do what you want? Here is some sample code:

 class Program
{



    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        TimerEx timer = new TimerEx(1000, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
        timer.ElapsedEx += new ElapsedExEventHandler(timer_ElapsedEx);
        timer.Start();


        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static void timer_ElapsedEx(object sender, ElapsedEventArgsEx e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(e.P1.ToString());
    }



    public delegate void ElapsedExEventHandler(object sender, ElapsedEventArgsEx e);

    public class TimerEx : System.Timers.Timer
    {
        private ElapsedEventArgsEx e;

        public TimerEx(double interval, object p1, object p2, object p3, object p4, object p5) : base(interval)
        {
            e = new ElapsedEventArgsEx() { P1 = p1, P2 = p2, P3 = p3, P4 = p4, P5 = p5 };
            this.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(TimerEx_Elapsed);
        }

        void TimerEx_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            this.OnElapsedEx(e.SignalTime);
        }



        public event ElapsedExEventHandler ElapsedEx;
        private void OnElapsedEx(DateTime signalTime)
        {
            var handler = this.ElapsedEx;
            if (handler != null)
            {
                e.SignalTime = signalTime;
                handler(this, e);
            }
        }
    }

    public class ElapsedEventArgsEx : EventArgs
    {
        public ElapsedEventArgsEx()
        {

        }

        public DateTime SignalTime { get; set; }
        public object P1 { get; set; }
        public object P2 { get; set; }
        public object P3 { get; set; }
        public object P4 { get; set; }
        public object P5 { get; set; }
    }

    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use an anonymous delegate.

Lambda syntax is the easiest way to make one

aTimer.Elapsed += (source, args) => OnTimedEvent(source, args, extraarg1, extraarg2 /* etc */);

But you can use the older syntax also:

aTimer.Elapsed += delegate (object source, ElapsedEventArgs args) { OnTimedEvent(source, args, extraarg1, extraarg2 /* etc */); };
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.