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When I put inverse=true into set, nothing gets deleted. When I don't, and I remove MealIngredient from set, then Hibernate tries to set null, it fails and exception is thrown:

[SQLITE_CONSTRAINT]  Abort due to constraint violation (MealIngredients.mealId may not be NULL)

Here are XML mappings:

<class name="restaurant.meal.Meal" table="Meals">
    <id name="id" type="integer">
        <column name="id" not-null="true" unique="true"/>
        <generator class="increment"/>
    </id>
    <!-- some other, simple properties -->

    <set name="ingredientsSet" cascade="all" lazy="false">
        <key>
            <column name="mealId" not-null="true" />
        </key>
        <one-to-many class="restaurant.meal.MealIngredient" />
    </set>
</class>

<class name="restaurant.meal.MealIngredient" table="MealIngredients">
    <composite-id name="id" class="restaurant.meal.MealIngredient$Id">
        <key-property name="ingredientId" />
        <key-property name="mealId" />
    </composite-id>
    <many-to-one name="ingredient" class="restaurant.storage.Ingredient" insert="false" update="false" lazy="false">
        <column name="ingredientId" not-null="true" />
    </many-to-one>
    <many-to-one name="meal" class="restaurant.meal.Meal" insert="false" update="false" lazy="false">
        <column name="mealId" not-null="true" />
    </many-to-one>
    <!-- other properties -->
</class>

Yes, the relationship between Meal and Ingredient is many-to-many with join table MealIngredient (and yes, I have to map MealIngredient as well, because of additional columns in that table).

This question did not help me, neither did this.

Edit: Only inserting works with current mapping, update just generates another row in MealIngredient table.


Edit 2: hashCode and equals implementations:

MealIngredient$Id: (uses Apache commons-lang EqualsBuilder and HashCodeBuilder)

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    if(!(o instanceof Id))
        return false;

    Id other = (Id) o;
    return new EqualsBuilder()
               .append(this.getMealId(), other.getMealId())
               .append(this.getIngredientId(), other.getIngredientId())
               .isEquals();
}

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return new HashCodeBuilder()
               .append(this.getMealId())
               .append(this.getIngredientId())
               .hashCode();
}

MealIngredient:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o)
{
    if(!(o instanceof MealIngredient))
        return false;

    MealIngredient other = (MealIngredient) o;
    return this.getId().equals(other.getId());
}

@Override
public int hashCode()
{
    return this.getId().hashCode();
}

I checked log and although I don't know what Hibernate does under the hood, but it does make the insert into MealIngredient:

15:42:53,122 TRACE IntegerType:172 - returning '5' as column: quantity3_
Hibernate: 
    insert 
    into
        MealIngredients
        (quantity, ingredientId, mealId) 
    values
        (?, ?, ?)
15:42:53,131 TRACE IntegerType:133 - binding '16' to parameter: 1
15:42:53,131 TRACE IntegerType:133 - binding '5' to parameter: 2
15:42:53,131 TRACE IntegerType:133 - binding '1' to parameter: 3

And when I remove MealIngredient from Meal.ingredientsSet, Hibernate makes update and tries to set mealId to null:

Hibernate: 
    update
        MealIngredients 
    set
        quantity=? 
    where
        ingredientId=? 
        and mealId=?
15:48:57,529 TRACE IntegerType:126 - binding null to parameter: 1
15:48:57,529 TRACE IntegerType:133 - binding '1' to parameter: 2
15:48:57,531 TRACE IntegerType:133 - binding '1' to parameter: 3
15:48:57,535  WARN JDBCExceptionReporter:77 - SQL Error: 0, SQLState: null
15:48:57,535 ERROR JDBCExceptionReporter:78 - [SQLITE_CONSTRAINT]  Abort due to constraint violation (MealIngredients.quantity may not be NULL)
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2 Answers 2

I believe the explanation you're looking for is here. Well, sort of. Don't read his explanation, it confuses me. His examples are excellent though.

So, anyways, I think you want to do one of the following:

inverse=false and remove the mealIngredient from your ingredients collection and then save the Meal

inverse=true and have to null the meal instance variable in MealIngredient and save the MealIngredient

EDIT: The issue with inserts instead of updates is probably due to the fact that you have not over-ridden hashcode and equals. If you're using Eclipse, I believe it can do it for you, but you must tell it to use both properties of your composite key when it auto generates the methods. Per Hibernate documentation chapter 5:

The persistent class must override equals() and hashCode() to implement composite identifier equality. It must also implement Serializable.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, the first option is what I'm looking for. I've tried many variations of the mappings (inverse with true/false, changed cascade options in Meal mapping as well as MealIngredient). None of that worked. Actually, now it does not even duplicate the record, it just does nothing (does not even update other properties in Meal). And regarding equals() and hashCode(), I do have implemented them, and it still does not work. –  mnn Apr 27 '13 at 13:09
    
@mnn Your MealIngredient.equals() and MealIngredient.hacode() methods shouldn't be using the Hibernate id for comparison. Remember that when you first create it, if you're using an autogenerated key it's going to be null until you persist the object. More info here (I don't think that will fix your problem, but it will help later). –  Matt Rick Apr 27 '13 at 14:48
    
@mnn From the trace, it looks like Hibernate is trying to set your mealIngredient's quantity to null and that column has not null. Also, after sleeping on it, removing a MealIngredient from a Meal should probably result in the MealIngredient being deleted() since I bet mealId is not null as well. –  Matt Rick Apr 27 '13 at 15:03
    
But when I create MealIngredient, I create it with mealId already set. I don't put it into Meal.ingredientsSet until after ingredientId is correctly set to existing Ingredient. It's Meal and Ingredient that use autogenerated key, and they're not created in this case. No, when I'm deleting MealIngredient, I just remove it from Meal.ingredientsSet, as you said I should (with inverse=false), and it is not removed from MealIngredients table. –  mnn Apr 27 '13 at 15:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, it seems that Hibernate does not work well with composite primary keys. I had to add extra ID column into many-to-many join tables (like my MealIngredient) and work with that.

After I use extra ID as primary key, inserting/updating/deleting works as expected (even with cascade set to delete-orphan, cascade deleting works!).

I provide final mappings for entities Meal and MealIngredient, for future reference. I hope this will help others, when they stumble upon many-to-many relationships with additional properties/columns in join table.

<class name="restaurant.meal.Meal" table="Meals">
    <id name="id" type="integer">
        <column name="id" not-null="true" unique="true"/>
        <generator class="increment"/>
    </id>
    <!-- additional properties -->

    <set name="ingredientsSet" table="MealIngredients" cascade="all-delete-orphan" lazy="false" inverse="true">
        <key update="true">
            <column name="mealId" not-null="true" />
        </key>
        <one-to-many class="restaurant.meal.MealIngredient" />
    </set>
</class>
<class name="restaurant.meal.MealIngredient" table="MealIngredients">
    <id name="id" type="integer">
        <column name="id" not-null="true" unique="true"/>
        <generator class="increment"/>
    </id>
    <many-to-one name="ingredient" column="ingredientId" not-null="true" class="restaurant.storage.Ingredient"  lazy="false" />
    <many-to-one name="meal" column="mealId" not-null="true" class="restaurant.meal.Meal" lazy="false" />

    <!-- additional properties -->
</class>
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