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I am trying to link my program statically with glibc, because version of the glibc on the target machine is pretty much unpredictable. I used linker flags -static-libgcc and -static-libstdc++ and it worked fine. The executable is big, but I can live with it. Unfortunately, when I run my executable on the target machine (it is named 'mytest' in the example below) I get the following error:

./mytest: /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6: version `GLIBCXX_3.4.11' not found (required by libboost_log.so.1.53.0)
./mytest: /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6: version `GLIBCXX_3.4.15' not found (required by libboost_log.so.1.53.0)
./mytest: /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6: version `GLIBCXX_3.4.9' not found (required by libboost_log.so.1.53.0)
./mytest: /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6: version `GLIBCXX_3.4.15' not found (required by libboost_date_time.so.1.53.0)
./mytest: /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6: version `GLIBCXX_3.4.9' not found (required by libboost_thread.so.1.53.0)

If I do 'strings' on mytest, it gives me

$ strings mytest | grep GLIBC
GLIBC_2.9
GLIBC_2.7
GLIBC_2.8
GLIBC_2.3.2
GLIBC_2.2.5
GLIBCXX_3.4.15
GLIBCXX_3.4.11
GLIBCXX_3.4.14
GLIBCXX_3.4.9
GLIBCXX_3.4

What means, I think, that the static linking was working ok. Why does the loader still tries to look for my functions in shared glibc and libstdc++? What am I doing wrong?

Thanks!

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am trying to link my program statically with glibc, because version of the glibc on the target machine is pretty much unpredictable. I used linker flags -static-libgcc and -static-libstdc++ and it worked fine.

That didn't affect the version of glibc (libc), which is different from libgcc and libstdc++. With these flags, you still have produced a dynamically-linked executable, which is expected to not work on an older distribution.

You can link your executable with -static flag, and that should give you a completely static executable.

Update:

After re-reading your question; your problem is not with glibc. Your problem is that you are linking with libboost_log.so, which itself depends on libstdc++.so.6.

The answer then is to link with libboost*.a instead of libboost*.so. You can try to achieve it this way:

g++ $(OBJS) -static-libgcc -static-libstdc++ -Wl,-Bstatic -lboost_log ... \
  -Wl,-Bdynamic

(It is very important to have the trailing -Wl,-Bdynamic.)

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks. Unfortunately, I cannot link everything statically, because then my pthread library is not working. For whatever reason, it works ok only if it linked dynamically. – svetlana Apr 27 '13 at 7:22
    
@svetlana libpthread is part of glibc. If you can't link it statically, then you can't have a fully static executable, and that implies that your executable will never work on an older system (that's just not supported). Static linking does work for multithreaded programs in general, so you need to either figure out why it isn't working for your particular case, or give up on the whole idea. – Employed Russian Apr 27 '13 at 15:13
    
@svetlana Answer updated. – Employed Russian Apr 27 '13 at 17:49
    
Ah, this is interesting. I've never used -B flags, but it might work. Thank you again :) – svetlana Apr 28 '13 at 10:58
    
Ok, I've tried your suggestion. Now I get ./mytest: symbol lookup error: /home/sveta/mytest/lib/libstdc++.so.6: undefined symbol: _ZGVNSt8numpunctIcE2idE, version GLIBCXX_3.4 IF I try readelf -Ws mytest, I can see the symbol. Needless to say, it is present in the libstdc++.so.6. I'm lost... Back to the original question: why it doesn't use static version from the executable??? – svetlana Apr 28 '13 at 14:38

Linking with -static-libgcc and -static-libstdc++ will only work for those libraries. It looks like you are also linking against the boost libraries (likely dynamically) which then link against libgcc and libstdc++.

Try running the following:

ldd mytest

It should show "not a dynamic executable". If it shows anything else, it means it is dynamically linked against other libraries. It doesn't always work so easily, but try adding -static to the compilation line as well to take care of remaining libraries.

share|improve this answer
    
Alec, it shows 'not a dynamic executable'. I feel weirder and weirder... – svetlana Apr 28 '13 at 14:44

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