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I'm currently writing a wrapper for two streams. Finally, I would like to imitate a conversation with a Person to make my code clear&nice for using.

Declaration

class Person
{
public:
    void process();

private:
    std::stringstream _request;
    std::stringstream _response;
}

Usage

Person daniel;
std::stringstream answer;
daniel << "Hello" << std::endl; // f.e std::endl means end of the phrase
daniel << "How" << "are you";
daniel << "doing?";
daniel >> answer;
daniel.process();
std::cout << "Daniel says: " << answer;
// or
std::cout << "Daniel says: " << daniel;

I feel that I can achieve it by overloading << and >> operators, but I'm stuck. I've never used streams for those purposes. I've googled a lot, apparently still can't understand the basic stuff.

Nutshell

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& o, const person& p)
{
    output << p._response.rdbuf();

    return (output);
}

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& i, person& p)
{
    p._request << i.rdbuf();
    // internal process() call probably will be better
    return (p._request);
}

Some example will be fantastic, indeed, but I'll be absolutely happy with rough ideas which drive me out of the impasse.

share|improve this question
2  
"but I'm stuck" What is the problem exactly? – Matt Phillips Apr 27 '13 at 0:49
    
In understanding of how it should be, I think. Don't feel myself comformtable in this topic. Now, compiler says: Invalid operands to binary expression ('person' and 'const char [4]') for person << "abc"; – danilabagroff Apr 27 '13 at 1:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Honestly, I don't see the point why do you want this, but I suppose this is some sort of exercise or homework. Anyway, there are some subtleties associated with implementing this functionality, which I suspect you wouldn't be able to figure out yourself, so here is the working solution.

Person

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

class Person {
public:
    void process() {
        // Let's see what we've got in `_request`
        std::cout << _request.rdbuf() << std::endl;

        // Do some processing to produce correponding _response

        // In this example we hardcode the response
       _response << "I'm fine, thanks!";
    }

private:
    std::stringstream _request;
    std::stringstream _response;

    // Make them all friends so that they can access `_request` and `_response`
    friend Person& operator<<(Person& p, std::string const& s);
    friend Person& operator<<(Person& p, std::ostream& (*f)(std::ostream&));
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &o, Person& p);
    friend Person& operator>>(Person& p, std::string& s);
};

Person& operator<<(Person& p, const std::string& s) {
    p._request << s;

    return p;
}

// Notice this peculiar signature, it is required to support `std::endl`
Person& operator<<(Person& p, std::ostream& (*f)(std::ostream&)) {
    p._request << f;

    return p;                           
}

// Somewhat conventional stream operator overload (in terms of signature)
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &o, Person& p) {
    o << p._response.rdbuf();

    return o;
}

Person& operator>>(Person& p, std::string& s) {
    // NOTE: This will read not the whole `_reponse` to `s`, but will stop on
    // the first whitespace. This is the default behavior of `>>` operator of
    // `std::stringstream`.
    p._response >> s;

    return p;
}

It is worth mentioning that your first attempt is completely wrong in terms of the functionality you are trying to achieve. This boils down to the fact that you seem to be following the conventional tutorials on the stream operator overloading, whereas here the approach should be different in order to achieve desired functionality. In particular, pay attention to signatures of the proposed stream operator overloads.

Furthermore, you'd have to add more overloads to support other input types, such as int, for example. Essentially, you'd have to add more overloads similar to the ones std::basic_ostream provides out-of-the-box. In particular, pay attention to the last one:

basic_ostream& operator<<(basic_ostream& st, 
                          std::basic_ostream& (*func)(std::basic_ostream&));

This guy is there to support std::endl. Notice that I've already added similar overload to Person for you, so that std::endl will work properly (see below). Other overloads, like for primitive types, are left as an exercise for you.

Reading Response

The one that you wanted in the first place.

int main() {
    Person daniel;

    daniel << "Hello" << std::endl;
    daniel << "How " << "are you";
    daniel << " doing?" << std::endl;

    // We are ready to process the request so do it
    daniel.process();

    // And Daniel's answer is...
    std::cout << "Daniel says: " << daniel << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Reading Response: The Alternative Way

This one is somewhat clumsy and cumbersome, and is basically the result of the comment in the implementation of Person& operator>>(Person& p, std::string& s) overload (see above).

int main() {
    Person daniel;

    daniel << "Hello" << std::endl;
    daniel << "How " << "are you";
    daniel << " doing?" << std::endl;

    // We are ready to process the request so do it
    daniel.process();

    // And Daniel's answer is...
    std::string part1;
    std::string part2;
    std::string part3;

    // Will read "I'm"
    daniel >> part1;

    // Will read "fine,"
    daniel >> part2;

    // Will read "thanks!"
    daniel >> part3;

    std::cout << "Daniel says: " << part1 << " " << part2 << " " << part3 << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A huge thank you. You helped me a lot! – danilabagroff Apr 27 '13 at 10:45

rdbuf() doesn't return a string. You should call str() to get a std::string from the stringstream. You need to declare these two functions friend of the class in order to access its private attributes.

class Person
{
public:
    void process();

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& o, const person& p);
    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& i, person& p);
private:
    std::stringstream _request;
    std::stringstream _response;
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& o, const person& p)
{
    o << p._response.str();

    return (o);
}

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& i, person& p)
{
    i >> p._request;
    // internal process() call probably will be better
    return i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although what you say is partly true (usage of rdbuf is perfectly fine), the final solution is nowhere near to be providing the desired functionality, therefore, in general, this answer is incorrect. See my answer for more details. – Alexander Shukaev Apr 27 '13 at 2:25

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