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I am attempting to read saved data from a file. I am trying to convert the information in the buffer from a string to characters and assign their values to the members of the structure. It seems the data is not being accessed correctly,when I print out the node values, it is different from what is sored in the file. I cant see where I am going wrong.

The file format:

    3 2 43 4 
    2 4 5 6
    $Node
    4
    1 0 -1 0
    2 0 1 0 
    3 10 -1 0
    4 10 1 0
    $EndNodes
    $Elements
    2
    1 2 3 4 
    2 3 5 6
    $EndElements

The code:

    struct Node {
        int x; // position                                                 
        int y; //position                                                  
        int z; //position                                                  
        int total_node_nums;  // total node numbers                        
    };

    struct Element{
        int total_elmt_num; // total element numbers                      
        struct Node *node; // array of nodes                               
    };

The call from main:

    void arr_creator(char *fname, char *str_start, char *str_end); 

arr_creator:

void arr_creator(char *fname, char *str_start, char *str_end){ 

    FILE *fl_read; 
    char buffer[512], line_buff[20]; 
    int i,num_node,tag,line = 0; 

    fl_read = fopen(fname, "r"); 
    if(fl_read == NULL){
        printf("\n[error reading file] :: in function arr_creator\n");
        return; 
    }

    // Scan file for str_start
    while(fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer),fl_read) != NULL ) {

        if(strstr(buffer,str_start)){ 
            printf("\nline: %d   string: %s \n",line+1, str_start); 

            fgets(buffer,sizeof(buffer),fl_read); 

            num_node = atoi(buffer); 
            printf("num_node = %d\n", num_node); 
            struct Node *node; 
            node = malloc((num_node+1)*sizeof(node)); 

            for(i=1; i<num_node+1;i++){

                sscanf(buffer,"%d %d %d %d", &tag, &node[i].x, &node[i].y, &node[i].z);

                printf("--------------\n"); 
                printf("   Node %d   \n", tag); 
                printf("--------------\n"); 
                printf("node[%d].x = %d\n",i, node[i].x); 
                printf("node[%d].y = %d\n",i, node[i].y); 
                printf("node[%d].z = %d\n",i, node[i].z); 
                printf("BUFFER  ::  %s", buffer); 
            } 
        }
        line++;
        if(strstr(buffer,str_end)){
            printf("buffer at break :: %s", buffer); 
            // buffer[0] = '\0'; 
            break; 
        }   
     }
     if(fl_read){
         fclose(fl_read); 
     }
}
share|improve this question
    
Indentation is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT! Your name has been put on my list of indentation offenders. I won't say this again. If we can't read your code, we won't bother helping you with it. Got it? –  Freenode-newboston Sebivor Apr 27 '13 at 2:10
    
Thank you for the warning. –  butter_pWn Apr 27 '13 at 2:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

rewrite your code as described below

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct Node {
    int tag;
    int x; //position
    int y; //position
    int z; //position
};

struct Nodes {
    int total_node_num;
    struct Node *nodes;//array of node
};

struct Nodes *arr_creator(char *fname, char *str_start, char *str_end){ 
    FILE *fl_read; 
    char buffer[512]; 
    int line = 0; 

    fl_read = fopen(fname, "r"); 
    if(fl_read == NULL){
        printf("\n[error reading file] :: in function arr_creator\n");
        return NULL; 
    }

    while(fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer),fl_read) != NULL ) {
        ++line;
        if(strstr(buffer, str_start)){
            int i, num_node;//work
            struct Node *node;//work

            printf("\nline: %d   string: %s \n", line, str_start); 
            struct Nodes *nodes = malloc(sizeof(struct Nodes));
            num_node = nodes->total_node_num = atoi(fgets(buffer,sizeof(buffer),fl_read));
            printf("num_node = %d\n", num_node); 
            node = nodes->nodes = malloc(num_node*sizeof(struct Node)); 
            for(i=0;;i++){
                fgets(buffer,sizeof(buffer),fl_read);
                if(strstr(buffer, str_end)){
                    if(i == num_node){
                        printf("buffer at break :: %s", buffer); 
                    } else if(i < num_node){
                        fprintf(stderr, "The number of nodes less than the specified!");
                        nodes->total_node_num = i;
                    }
                    fclose(fl_read);
                    return nodes;
                } else if(i >= num_node){
                    fprintf(stderr, "The number of nodes more than the specified!\n"
                                    "*read only the number of specified.*");
                    fclose(fl_read);
                    return nodes;
                }
                //read node check print
                sscanf(buffer," %d %d %d %d ", &node[i].tag, &node[i].x, &node[i].y, &node[i].z);
                printf("--------------\n"); 
                printf("   Node %d   \n", node[i].tag); 
                printf("--------------\n"); 
                printf("node[%d].x = %d\n",i, node[i].x); 
                printf("node[%d].y = %d\n",i, node[i].y); 
                printf("node[%d].z = %d\n",i, node[i].z); 
                printf("BUFFER  ::  %s", buffer); 
            }
        }
    }
    fclose(fl_read);
    return NULL;
}

int main(void) {
    struct Nodes *nodes;
    struct Node  *node;
    int i;
    nodes=arr_creator("data.txt", "$Node", "$EndNodes");
    node = nodes->nodes;
    for(i=0;i<nodes->total_node_num;++i){
        printf("\n   Node %d   \n", node[i].tag); 
        printf("--------------\n"); 
        printf("node[%d].x = %d\n",i, node[i].x); 
        printf("node[%d].y = %d\n",i, node[i].y); 
        printf("node[%d].z = %d\n",i, node[i].z); 
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks!! This helped, along with undefined behavior’s fix for the memory allocation and for the assert statements. I also removed printf statements from the function and printed through main. –  butter_pWn Apr 27 '13 at 18:56
    
@butter_pWn It was good. –  BLUEPIXY Apr 27 '13 at 19:00
    
@butter_pWn Don't leave the assert statements in your release code. The purpose behind me putting them there is to illustrate wnat could go wrong in your code, in such a way that doesn't deter from the end goal. You should replace those with correct error handling... That's why I put the comments in. –  Freenode-newboston Sebivor Apr 28 '13 at 17:18
    
@Undefinedbehaviour Thanks, I am still working on it, but for now I have left them in (to catch my mistakes). I have seen some codes with assert statements left in - is that bad practice? –  butter_pWn Apr 28 '13 at 19:42
    
@butter_pWn No. assert is an excellent tool, but it isn't an error handler. It's excellent internal documentation. When you read something like assert(x >= 0);, you know from that point on that x is supposed to be positive, and that when you're debugging your code and it turns out to be false at that point, you will be told. Hence, you can use it to help debug very complex algorithms one step at a time, and document the algorithm as you debug it. –  Freenode-newboston Sebivor Apr 28 '13 at 20:24

You need to call fgets again in the for loop. You're just reading the same buffer contents over and over again. And it's still the first line with only 1 number in it.

share|improve this answer
    
@droog: Thanks, I tried, it caused a segmentation fault. –  butter_pWn Apr 27 '13 at 2:30
    
See undefined behavior's answer. He found more problems than I did. –  luser droog Apr 27 '13 at 2:34

You're not allocating memory correctly. I refer to these four lines, though the last is the main offender, the others aren't too nice, either. By allocating less than the required space to store a struct Node, you're invoking undefined behaviour when you try to access beyond the allocated region.

num_node = atoi(buffer); 
printf("num_node = %d\n", num_node); 
struct Node *node; 
node = malloc((num_node+1)*sizeof(node)); 

node is a pointer. What do you expect the size of a pointer to be? It's probably not what you want it to be.

This is rather silly, using an int to determine how many objects to allocate. What if someone enters a negative number? Take note of how I handle sscanf return values. It might save you, one day. You can read more about that in the opengroup scanf manual (remember "opengroup scanf manual" so you know what to google).

size_t num_node; /* Suggestion: USE A SIZE TYPE! It's what they're for. */
assert(sscanf(buffer, "%zu", &num_node) == 1);
printf("num_node = %zu\n", num_node); 
struct Node *node; 
node = malloc((num_node+1) * sizeof *node);

*node isn't a pointer; It's an actual object. You want to allocate in terms of the size of the object, right?

I presume, by the look of your file format, that the number of lines is on a separate line to each node. You'll want to fgets another line before you try to parse it, in that case:

/* TODO: Handle read errors, rather than just `assert`ing that the read succeeds */
assert(fgets(buffer,sizeof buffer,fl_read) == buffer)

/* TODO: Handle parsing errors, rather than just `assert`ing that the parsing succeeds */
assert(sscanf(buffer,"%d %d %d %d", &tag, &node[i].x, &node[i].y, &node[i].z) == 4)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll be sure to add an if statement to handle error for both reading and parsing. -befp- –  butter_pWn Apr 27 '13 at 3:43

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