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Suppose we have this functions in a R package.

prova <- function() {
  print(attr(prova, 'myattr'))
  print(myattr(prova))
  invisible(TRUE)
}
'myattr<-' <- function(x, value) {
  attr(x, 'myattr') <- value
  x
}
myattr <- function(x) attr(x, 'myattr')

So, I install the package and then I test it. This is the result:

prova()
# NULL
# NULL
myattr(prova) <- 'ciao' # setting 'ciao' for 'myattr' attribute
prova()
# NULL
# NULL # Why NULL here ?
myattr(prova)
# [1] "ciao"
attr(prova, 'myattr')
# [1] "ciao"

The question is: how to get the attribute of the function from within itself?

Inside the function itself I cannot get its attribute, as demonstrated by the example.

I suppose that the solution will be of the serie "computing on the language" (match.call()[[1L]], substitute, environments and friends). Am I wrong?

I think that the important point here is that this function is in a package (so, it has its environment and namespace) and I need its attribute inside itself, in the package, not outside.

share|improve this question
    
it might be worth clarifying: getting the attribute and printing the attribute are two different things. –  Ricardo Saporta Apr 27 '13 at 3:25
    
@RicardoSaporta I need to verify if the attributes exists and get its value. –  leodido Apr 27 '13 at 3:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

you can use get with the envir argument.

prova <- function() {

  print(attr(get("prova", envir=envir.prova), 'myattr'))
  print(myattr(prova))
  invisible(TRUE)
}

eg:

envir.prova <- environment()
prova()
# NULL
# NULL
myattr(prova) <- 'ciao' 
prova()
# [1] "ciao"
# [1] "ciao" 

Where envir.prova is a variable whose value you set to the environment in which prova is defined.
Alternatively you can use get(.. envir=parent.frame()), but that is less reliable as then you have to track the calls too, and ensure against another object with the same name between the target environment and the calling environment.

Update regarding question in the comments:

regarding using parent.frame() versus using an explicit environment name: parent.frame, as the name suggests, goes "up one level." Often, that is exactly where you want to go, so that works fine. And yet, even when your goal is get an object in an environment further up, R searches up the call stack until it finds the object with the matching name. So very often, parent.frame() is just fine.

HOWEVER if there are multiple calls between where you are invoking parent.frame() and where the object is located AND in one of the intermediary environments there exists another object with the same name, then R will stop at that intermediary environment and return its object, which is not the object you were looking for.

Therefore, parent.frame() has an argument n (which defaults to 1), so that you can tell R to begin it's search at n levels back.

This is the "keeping track" that I refer to, where the developer has to be mindful of the number of calls in between. The straightforward way to go about this is to have an n argument in every function that is calling the function in question, and have that value default to 1. Then for the envir argument, you use: get/assign/eval/etc (.. , envir=parent.frame(n=n) )

Then if you call Func2 from Func1, (both Func1 and Func2 have an n argument), and Func2 is calling prova, you use:

  Func1 <- function(x, y, ..., n=1) { 

    ... some stuff ... 
    Func2( <some, parameters, etc,> n=n+1)
  }  


  Func2 <- function(a, b, c, ..., n=1) { 

     .... some stuff.... 
     eval(quote(prova()), envir=parent.frame(n=n) )
  }

As you can see, it is not complicated but it is * tedious* and sometimes what seems like a bug creeps in, which is simply forgetting to carry the n over.

Therefore, I prefer to use a fixed variable with the environment name.

share|improve this answer
    
I feel that we are both close to the solution ;), even if, probably due to some my error, your solution does not work for me. Regarding my solutions (that now I post) I'm stuck exactly on this: as then you have to track the calls too and ensure.. Infact, I don't want that the user have to do anything else that calling the function that sets the attribute. –  leodido Apr 27 '13 at 4:56
    
@leodido, any progress? –  Ricardo Saporta Apr 27 '13 at 22:54
    
I think I've made ​​some progress and learned something new. By the way, I updated my answer, making it more complete for future reference. –  leodido Apr 28 '13 at 3:10
    
However, probably it is my fault but I cannot get it to work with your technique (i.e. using a fixed variable with the environment name). Tomorrow I will get it another try. –  leodido Apr 28 '13 at 3:13
1  
I think you've misdiagnosed the problem: when you do myattr(prova) <- 'ciao' you're creating a new object called prova in the global environment, not modifying the attribute of the object called prova in your package. –  hadley Apr 28 '13 at 20:36

The solution that I found is:

myattr <- function(x) attr(x, 'myattr')

'myattr<-' <- function(x, value) {
  # check that x is a function (e.g. the prova function)
  # checks on value (e.g. also value is a function with a given precise signature)
  attr(x, 'myattr') <- value
  x
}

prova <- function(..., env = parent.frame()) {
  # get the current function object (in its environment)
  this <- eval(match.call()[[1L]], env)
  # print(eval(as.call(c(myattr, this)), env)) # alternative
  print(myattr(this))
  # print(attr(this, 'myattr')

  invisible(TRUE)
}   

I want to thank @RicardoSaporta for the help and the clarification about keeping tracks of the calls.

This solution doesn't work when e.g. myattr(prova) <- function() TRUE is nested in func1 while prova is called in func2 (that it's called by func1). Unless you do not properly update its parameter env ...

For completeness, following the suggestion of @RicardoSaporta, I slightly modified the prova function:

prova <- function(..., pos = 1L) {
  # get the current function object (in its environment)
  this <- eval(match.call()[[1L]], parent.frame(n = pos)
  print(myattr(this))
  # ...
}  

This way, it works also when nested, if the the correct pos parameter is passed in.

With this modification it is easier to go to fish out the environment in which you set the attribute on the function prova.

myfun1 <- function() {
  myattr(prova) <- function() print(FALSE)
  myfun2(n = 2)
}
myfun2 <- function(n) {
  prova(pos = n)
}
myfun1()

# function() print(FALSE)
# <environment: 0x22e8208>
share|improve this answer
1  
the reason the function f works is because myattr is defined outside of it's scope. So when myattr begins to look for prova it starts before f and therefore never sees the prova object that is local to f. When you call prova() from inside f, the ( ) let R know to look for a function, which it does not find inside f and hence searches up the callstack. If you bring the definition of myattr<- to INSIDE f (placing it above where you placed prova<-'bye', I suspect that you will see a different result. –  Ricardo Saporta Apr 27 '13 at 6:28

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