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I have a habit of writing code to be compilable on both C and C++ compilers, for example:

some_type *foo = (some_type *) malloc(sizeof (some_type));

When I ask questions about my C code, I'm told not to cast malloc. This is the only way to allocate memory in C that's guaranteed to compile in C++. Why is this a bad idea in C? Why is this a bad idea in C++?

Which other features of C am I missing out on by restricting myself to a subset of features that are compatible to C++? Why is restricting myself to a subset of features that are also compatible to C++ a bad idea in C?

Which features of C++ am I missing out on by restricting myself to a subset of features that are compatible to C? Why is restricting myself to a subset of features that are also compatible to C a bad idea in C++? I'm most interested in answers that encompass differences introduced by the core language, rather than the standard libraries.

Is there a more productive alternative to incorporate C code into a C++ project than compiling any C code I rely upon with the same C++ compiler I use to compile my C++ code? When should I use a C compiler? When should I use a C++ compiler? Is there any way to incorporate C code into a C++ project, that doesn't involve using the C++ compiler to compile C code? Emphasis on this in your answer would be particularly useful.

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closed as not constructive by Radu Murzea, Wooble, Jesse, rightfold, Graviton May 21 '13 at 11:41

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That's a lot of question marks. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 27 '13 at 3:21
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If it helps, on Visual Studio, I'm actually forced to compile C code as C++ because the VS C compiler is dysfunctional. –  Mysticial Apr 27 '13 at 3:21
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Choose a language and use it. Trying to restrict yourself to a common subset will grant you the worst of both worlds. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 27 '13 at 3:23
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Difficult to evaluate without knowing your goals. If you like C, sticking to a subset of C++ which is purely C-standard-compatible is not very likely to help you in any way, since I feel safe saying that you won't find a platform that has a C++ compiler but no C compiler. You might as well enjoy writing idiomatic C code. –  Joel Nelson Apr 27 '13 at 3:35
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@JoelNelson It's usually the intermingled declaration/code, and // comments that choke the VS C compiler. Both of these have been enabled by default in GCC without -std=c99. But VS sticks hard with C89 and does not allow either of those extensions. So a lot of code that compiles on GCC by default, won't compile on VS. –  Mysticial Apr 27 '13 at 4:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You ask many questions:

When I ask questions about my C code, I'm told not to cast malloc. This is the only way to allocate memory in C that's guaranteed to compile in C++. Why is this a bad idea in C? Why is this a bad idea in C++?

Casting the return value of malloc() in C is considered bad because it can hide the fact that the prototype to malloc() is missing. By not casting, the compiler will alert you that you need to #include <stdlib.h>. The cast is unnecessary in C, because the language allows for implicit conversion of void * to another pointer type.

Casting is generally not desirable. In C++ there are many mechanisms available that allow casting to be avoided. For example, the new and delete operators, inheritance, polymorphism, and templates are features of C++ that can be leveraged to write type safe code without the need for casting.

Which other features of C am I missing out on by restricting myself to a subset of features that are compatible to C++? Why is restricting myself to a subset of features that are also compatible to C++ a bad idea in C?

Off the top of my head, two features of C that might be useful but are missing in C++ would be (1) designated initialization for aggregate types, and (2) variable length arrays. As C is mostly a subset of C++, I don't generally find an issue with using a C++ compiler as a "more strongly type-safe" C, but then you certainly don't want to be writing code that is throwing in a bunch of casts (type-safety goes out the window).

The only time I would use a C++ compiler to compile C code is if there was a large base of legacy C code, to which you as the developer wish to update or modify with functionality that would be more easily implemented in C++.

Which features of C++ am I missing out on by restricting myself to a subset of features that are compatible to C? Why is restricting myself to a subset of features that are also compatible to C a bad idea in C++?

You lose out on all the object oriented and generic programming features that C++ has to offer. As a result, you are not able to properly leverage the language to full advantage. If you wish to write C code, it is better to just stick with a C compiler.

Are there any other alternatives? When should I use a C compiler? When should I use a C++ compiler? Is there any way to incorporate C code into a C++ project, that doesn't involve using the C++ compiler to compile C code?

Of course there are alternatives. You use a C compiler for C code, and C++ compiler for C++ code. If the C and C++ compiler are from the same vendor, then in all likelihood, the C ABI for both compilers will be the same. Then, if you want your C++ code to be able to call C functions, the function prototypes to those functions just need to advertise that they are using the C ABI:

extern "C" {
/* the C function prototypes of the code compiled by the C compiler */
}

You can use this in the same header file included by both C++ and C code by using a #ifdef to check to see if the code is being compiled by a C++ compiler or not.

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
/* ...the body of the C header file */
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

As a final caveat, unless you have a burning desire to learn a different language, it is generally more productive to use the language that you are most familiar with. If there is a requirement that a C++ compiler be used, then it would be best to learn how to leverage the language to your maximum benefit.

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Excellent answer. I could wrap the C header includes with extern "C" { ... } in my C++ file. Thanks! –  undefined behaviour Apr 27 '13 at 5:18
    
Do you have any experience with differing behaviour in regards to the % operator? –  undefined behaviour May 2 '13 at 22:42
    
No, but feel free to ask a new question. –  jxh May 2 '13 at 23:09
    
Ahhh! Are you telling me that's not relevant to this question? Well, I'll be an idiot... –  undefined behaviour May 2 '13 at 23:19

While the C-compatible subset of C++ does have some good points, it tends to give most of the weakest parts of both languages without the strengths of either.

The loss compared to writing good C is things like including unnecessary casts on the value returned from malloc. It can cover up bugs (e.g., forgetting to include <stdlib.h> to properly declare its return type) and almost inevitably renders the code less readable -- in particular, any time you see a cast, it should set off alarms to examine that code carefully, but is likely to result in dozens or hundreds of instances of it just being your poor decision.

Compared to well written C++, the loss is much greater. You're basically throwing away (or ignoring) many of the most useful pieces of the language that can make your code tremendously more maintainable and reliable. Just losing constructors and destructors, for example, deprives you of RAII (roughly equivalent to cutting off your legs before trying to run a marathon).

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This is a great answer, but I'd love to see how you'd use C code in a C++ project when you're not casting malloc, when new is used as an identifier in C code or when some external library uses some other feature that's not compatible with C++. –  undefined behaviour Apr 27 '13 at 4:09
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@undefinedbehaviour: leave the code as C. In the header add extern "C" { at the beginning and } at the end (but only when __cplusplus is defined. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 27 '13 at 4:16

The choice of programming language, whether it be C, C++, or any programming language is gauged by what you are trying to do. You use C and C++ for different reasons. C has less overhead than C++ and is much faster. You can access get down to the nitty gritty details when you work in C, whereas C++ might abstract some of those things away. For example, C++ has a string class to hold a sequence of characters, while in C you use a char[] and null terminate the string yourself. I always think it's best to work with the highest abstraction - why is it there if you not to make life easier.

As for your question about malloc, I have been taught to always cast the memory you get back. It is returned to you as a (void *), which can represent anything.

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C has less overhead and is much faster That claim I have heard many times before, but is it a fair comparison? It depends on what you do, how you do it... C++ can be faster than C, and C can be faster than C++. It all depends. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 27 '13 at 3:24
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@ChrisChambers: You are comparing oranges to apples. If you don't use polymorphism, then don't use it and the performance will be comparable (faster/slower depending on the particular use). If you need polymorphism, then implemeting it yourself you are probably going to make it worse and slower than the C++ implementation. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 27 '13 at 3:29
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@ChrisChambers: I've actually run some pretty intricate tests (enough that they take about an hour to run). The short answer is that under just the right circumstances, a switch can simulate polymorphism a tiny bit faster than most current C++ compilers do the job. In most cases the C++ compiler wins though and often by a much larger margin. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 27 '13 at 3:34
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-1: Many wrong, or at least misleading ideas in this answer. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 27 '13 at 3:35
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-1 Compare performance of std::sort to qsort and tell me how C is "much faster and has less overhead" is a true statement to make in general. C has many advantages (a much cleaner and better specified binary and link-time interface, for example), but "less overhead and faster" isn't one of them. –  Yakk Apr 27 '13 at 3:38

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