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I was asked by a friend :

If 2^10 = 1024 -- break apart the answer digits and sum its digits : 1+0+2+4 = 7.

This is easy.

However When the input is 2^30000 ( the input actually is a long string "1000...") --there is no .net type which can hold this value .

So there must be a trick to sum its digits (digits of the decimal value)....

Edited :

Related trick ( for finding 10^20 - 16)

100 = 10^2 (one and two zeros)

10^20 = (one and 20 zeros)

hence:

10^20 - 16 = 18 nines, an eight and four.

18*9+8+4 = 174

But I don't succeed converting this solution to my problem.( I tried quite a lot).

*Im tagging this question as .net becuase I can use string functions , math functions from .net library.*

What is the trick here ?

Edited #2 : Added the .net2 tag (where biginteger is unavailable) - I'm wondering how I could do it without biginteger.(i'm looking for the hidden trick)

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Are you asking specifically for 2^30000, powers of 2, or just generally any large number? –  Paulpro Apr 27 '13 at 7:48
    
@Paulpro powers of 2. 2^n where n is 1..lets say int.max . ( I say int.max just to indicate a number which its decimal representation cant fit into any .net type) –  Royi Namir Apr 27 '13 at 7:50
1  
The "trick" is wrong: If you subtract 33 from 100^20, the result will be 99...9999967 and not 100...0000967. –  dtb Apr 27 '13 at 7:58
1  
@Edwin: But how would that differ from computing 2^n? –  Blender Apr 27 '13 at 8:26
1  
@KenKin no. only the sum of the decimal numbers . example : 2^12=4096. so I want 4+0+9+6 which is 19. ( and i dont need 1+9 which is 10 which is 1+0 which is 1). –  Royi Namir May 1 '13 at 5:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

From http://blog.singhanuvrat.com/problems/sum-of-digits-in-ab:

public class Problem_16 {
    public long sumOfDigits(int base, int exp) {
        int numberOfDigits = (int) Math.ceil(exp * Math.log10(base));
        int[] digits = new int[numberOfDigits];
        digits[0] = base;
        int currentExp = 1;

        while (currentExp < exp) {
            currentExp++;
            int carry = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < digits.length; i++) {
                int num = base * digits[i] + carry;
                digits[i] = num % 10;
                carry = num / 10;
            }
        }

        long sum = 0;
        for (int digit : digits)
            sum += digit;

        return sum;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int base = 2;
        int exp = 3000;
        System.out.println(new Problem_16().sumOfDigits(base, exp));
    }
}

c#

public class Problem_16 {
    public long sumOfDigits(int base1, int exp) {
        int numberOfDigits = (int) Math.Ceiling(exp * Math.Log10(base1));
        int[] digits = new int[numberOfDigits];
        digits[0] = base1;
        int currentExp = 1;

        while (currentExp < exp) {
            currentExp++;
            int carry = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < digits.Length; i++) {
                int num = base1 * digits[i] + carry;
                digits[i] = num % 10;
                carry = num / 10;
            }
        }

        long sum = 0;
        foreach (int digit in  digits)
            sum += digit;

        return sum;
    }
}


void Main()
{
     int base1 = 2;
        int exp = 3000000;
        Console.WriteLine (new Problem_16().sumOfDigits(base1, exp));

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is Java, not C#. –  leppie May 7 '13 at 4:48
1  
I think he's looking for the method, not necessarily code. This method does not rely on BigInteger, which was his constraint. –  Whit Kemmey May 7 '13 at 4:55
    
The next step would be to parallelize its calculation - so all cores can be used :-) –  Royi Namir May 7 '13 at 5:33

You can leverage the BigInteger structure to do this. As it's written in MSDN

The BigInteger type is an immutable type that represents an arbitrarily large integer whose value in theory has no upper or lower bounds.

Basically after creating BigInteger instance and evaluating exponent you can translate it to a string. After that you will iterate over each character of that string and convert each char to int number. Add all those int numbers up and you'll get your answer.

BigInteger bi = new BigInteger(2);
var bi2 = BigInteger.Pow(bi, 30000);
BigInteger sum = new BigInteger();
foreach(var ch in bi2.ToString())
    sum = BigInteger.Add(sum, new BigInteger(int.Parse(ch.ToString())));
MessageBox.Show(bi2.ToString() + " - " + sum.ToString());
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. nice. I didnt know that biginteger can handle any length. Still Im curious if there is a trick here which I could use... –  Royi Namir Apr 27 '13 at 8:11

There is no general trick I'm aware of for finding the base 10 digit sum of a number.

However, there is an easy trick for finding the base 10 digit root of a number.

The digit sum is, as you say, simply the sum of all the digits. The base 10 digit sum of 1024 is 1 + 2 + 4 = 7. The base 10 digit sum of 65536 is 6 + 5 + 5 + 3 + 6 = 25.

The digit root is what you get when you repeat the digit sum until there's only one digit. The digit sum of 65536 is 25, so the digit root is 2 + 5 = 7.

The trick is: If you have Z = X * Y then DigitRoot(Z) = DigitRoot(DigitRoot(X) * DigitRoot(Y)). (Exercise to the reader: prove it! Hint: start by proving the same identity for addition.)

If you have an easily-factored number - and the easiest number to factor is 2n -- then it is easy to figure out the digit root recursively: 216 = 28 * 28, so DigitRoot(216) = DigitRoot(DigitRoot(28) * DigitRoot(28)) -- We just made the problem much smaller. Now we don't have to calculate 216, we only have to calculate 28. You can of course use this trick with 230000 -- break it down to DigitRoot(DigitRoot(215000 * DigitRoot(215000)). If 215000 is too big, break it down further; keep breaking it down until you have a problem small enough to solve.

Make sense?

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base 10 digit root is simply mod 9. since 2 and 9 co-prime, there exists 1<=x<=9 so that 2^x = 1 (mod 9), here x = 6. So 2^30000=(2^6)^5000=1 (mod 9) –  colinfang Apr 27 '13 at 22:30
    
Thanks Eric. However I can't understand (according to your solution)-- how breaking apart 2^2n to 2^n * 2^n will help me compute the sum of digits of the decimal number representation of 2^2n. for example : 2^6=64 so the sum is 6+4=>10. –  Royi Namir Apr 28 '13 at 7:31
    
@colinfang If (2^6)^5000=1 (mod 9) how can I ( from here) calc te sum of digits ? –  Royi Namir Apr 28 '13 at 9:57
1  
@RoyiNamir what Eric said is that we don't know any simple trick to calc the digit sum. The method stated above is only for digit ROOT –  colinfang Apr 28 '13 at 12:26

I'm not convinced there can be a trick here. The latter trick you show works because both the number, and the result are both decimal numbers.

For example:
1267 = 1*10^3 + 2*10^2 + 6*10^1 + 7*10^0

So you there is a clear correlation between the power and the sum. But unfortunately if you want to convert binary numbers, or powers of 2, into decimal numbers, that's not going to work. Best effort would be reducing the power to increase the base number.

2^3000 = 4^1500 = 16^750 = 256^375

But as you see, the series jump over base 10. Which sadly means you need to calculate the end result as a decimal number before you can convert it into powers of 10. Making the trick not work.

share|improve this answer
    
2^3000 is not 8^750, 2^3000 is 16^750 –  Blablablaster Apr 27 '13 at 8:38
    
Thanks for correcting, made silly mistake with multiplying and not raising base into power. –  Sopuli Apr 27 '13 at 8:49

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