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The IEEE754 standard defines two classes of NaN, the quiet NaN, QNaN, and the signaling NaN, SNaN. When an SNaN is loaded into a floating point register, an exception is raised by the floating point unit.

QNaN is available to Delphi code through the constant named NaN that is declared in Math. The definition of that constant is:

const
  NaN = 0.0 / 0.0;

I would like to be able to use something similar to declare a constant that is a signaling NaN, but have not yet found a way to do that.

Naively you might write this code:

function SNaN: Double;
begin
  PInt64(@Result)^ := $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF;//this bit pattern specifies an SNaN
end;

But the ABI for floating point return values means that the SNaN is loaded into a floating point register so that it can be returned. Naturally that leads to an exception which rather defeats the purpose.

So you are then led to writing code like this:

procedure SetToSNaN(out D: Double);
begin
  PInt64(@D)^ := $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF;
end;

Now, this works, but it's very inconvenient. Suppose you need to pass an SNaN to another function. Ideally you would like to write:

Foo(SNaN)

but instead you have to do this:

var
  SNaN: Double;
....
SetToSNaN(SNaN);
Foo(SNaN);

So, after the build-up, here's the question.

Is there any way to write x := SNaN and have the floating point variable x assigned a value that is a signaling NaN?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried inlining your first approach? –  Uwe Raabe Apr 27 '13 at 8:04
1  
@UweRaabe In fact I have. I wanted to let somebody else write that answer so that they could get the rep. I still feel a little uneasy about relying on inlining. If the function call is somehow not inlined, then boom. –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 8:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This declaration solves it at compile time:

const
  iNaN : UInt64 = $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF;
var
  SNaN : Double absolute iNaN;

The compiler still treats the SNaN as a constant.

Trying to assign a value to SNaN will give a compile time error: E2064 Left side cannot be assigned to.

procedure DoSomething( var d : Double);
begin
  d := 2.0;
end;

SNaN := 2.0; // <-- E2064 Left side cannot be assigned to
DoSomething( SNaN); // <--E2197 Constant object cannot be passed as var parameter
WriteLn(Math.IsNaN(SNaN)); // <-- Writes "true"

Should you have the compiler directive $WRITEABLECONSTS ON (or $J+), this could be turned off temporarily to ensure not altering SNaN.

{$IFOPT J+}
   {$DEFINE UNDEFWRITEABLECONSTANTS}
   {$J-}
{$ENDIF}

const
  iNaN : UInt64 = $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF;
var
  SNaN : Double ABSOLUTE iNaN;

{$IFDEF UNDEFWRITEABLECONSTANTS}
   {$J+}
{$ENDIF}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 That does the trick, but I would feel a tad queasy about the value living in a variable rather than a constant. –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 14:01
    
Assigning a value to SNaN will give a compiler error:E2064 Left side cannot be assigned to. –  LU RD Apr 27 '13 at 14:12
    
Ah, I see. Very nicely done indeed. –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 18:24

Here's another workaround:

type
  TFakeRecord = record
    case Byte of
      0: (SNaN: Double);
      1: (i: Int64);
  end;

const
  IEEE754: TFakeRecord = ( i: $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF);

The debugger shows IEEE754.SNaN as +NAN, however when you access it you'll still get a floating point exception. A workaround for that could be:

type
  ISet8087CW = interface
  end;

  TISet8087CW = class(TInterfacedObject, ISet8087CW)
  protected
    OldCW: Word;
  public
    constructor Create(const NewCW: Word);
    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

  TIEEE754 = record
    case Byte of
      0: (SNaN: Double);
      1: (i: Int64);
  end;

const
  IEEE754: TIEEE754 = ( i: $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF);

{ TISet8087CW }

constructor TISet8087CW.Create(const NewCW: Word);
begin
  OldCW := Get8087CW;
  Set8087CW(NewCW);
  inherited Create;
end;

destructor TISet8087CW.Destroy;
begin
  Set8087CW(OldCW);
  inherited;
end;

procedure TForm6.Button4Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  CW: ISet8087CW;
begin
  CW := TISet8087CW.Create($133F);
  Memo1.Lines.Add(Format('SNaN: %f', [IEEE754.SNaN]));
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like the RAII pattern is taking off in Delphi land. ;-) –  Warren P Apr 27 '13 at 13:11
    
+1 I quite like the variant record. By the way, did you know that Set8087CW is not threadsafe? –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 13:29
1  
Problem with interface controlled lifetime in general in Delphi is that the smallest unit of scope is the procedure. This is too coarse. It works well in C++ because blocks introduce new scopes. –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 17:00
1  
@Remko I don't think any of RTL functions on x86 call Set8087CW. But implementations of some on x64 do (well, SetMXSCR on x64 which has same flaw as Set8087CW). Which means calling standard RTL functions in one thread can change the fp unit state in another. It's a real shocker. I wrote about this here: qc.embarcadero.com/wc/qcmain.aspx?d=107411 –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 17:04
1  
@DavidHeffernan, I tried to download the attached document in your QC report, but the file was stored as a .htm file. Renaming the file to .zip fixed the problem. Excellent analysis and proposal BTW. –  LU RD Apr 28 '13 at 6:28

You can inline the function:

function SNaN: Double; inline;
begin
  PInt64(@Result)^ := $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF;
end;

But it will depend on the optimization and compiler mood.

I've seen some functions not inlined, without any clear understanding from the context. I do not like either relying on inlining.

What I would better do, and which will work on all versions of Delphi, is to use a global variable:

var
  SNaN: double;

Then set it in the initialization block of the unit:

const
  SNaN64 = $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF;

initialization
  PInt64(@SNaN)^ := SNaN64;
end.

Then you will be able to use SNaN just as a regular constant. That is, you can write code as expected:

var test: double;
...
  test := SNaN;

In the IDE debugger, it will be shown as "test = +NAN", which is the expected result, I suppose.

Note that using this SNaN will raise an exception when it is read into the FPU stack (e.g. if test=0 then) so you have to check the value at binary level... this is the reason why I defined a SNaN64 constant, which will make very fast code by the way.

  toto := SNaN;
  if PInt64(@toto)^<>SNaN64 then // will run and work as expected 
    DoubleToString(toto);
  if toto<>SNaN then // will raise an EInvalidOp at runtime
    DoubleToString(toto);

You can change this behavior by changing the x87 exception register:

backup := Set8087CW($133F);
try
  ..
finally
   Set8087CW(backup);
end;

I suppose this to be set globally for your program, in all extend of the code which will have to handle this SNaN constant.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't raising the exception the whole purpose of a signaling NaN? –  Uwe Raabe Apr 27 '13 at 8:48
    
In my experience, if the function is defined at the start of the implementation section of the unit that is compiled first, the function will always be inlined. –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 9:19
1  
As regards testing for SNaN, there are multiple bit patterns that are SNaN. So you need a better test. The IsNaN function in Math is a good start point. –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 9:22
    
@DavidHeffernan But I suspect you mainly want to test if the SNaN value has been set by your own code, right? In this case, testing the SNaN64 bit pattern is enough in practice. I wanted to answer your question, not all the upcomings. :) But +1 on your comment. –  Arnaud Bouchez Apr 27 '13 at 12:32
    
@UweRaabe Raising the exception... but in the scope of the function, as far as the question was asked. You can not blame me, since I made the exception scope explicit, and gave a workaround. This is why I added some details on the X87 exception register. –  Arnaud Bouchez Apr 27 '13 at 12:35

I use a function:

Function UndefinedFloat : double
Begin
  Result := Nan
End;

This then works 
Var 
  MyFloat : double;

Begin
  MyFloat := UndefinedFloat;
share|improve this answer
    
That's a QNaN but the question is about SNaN –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '13 at 11:37
    
Ah sorry. I did not understand the difference. –  Brian Frost Apr 28 '13 at 14:26

Here's a rather dirty way to do it, that results in very clean code for the consumer.

unit uSNaN;

interface

const
  SNaN: Double=0.0;//SNaN value assigned during initialization

implementation

initialization
  PInt64(@SNaN)^ := $7FF7FFFFFFFFFFFF;

end.

I was expecting the linker to put SNaN in a read-only segment of the executable but it appears not to do so. In any case, even if it did you could use VirtualProtect to get around that for the duration of the assignment.

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