Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Thanks for your help, I was able to summarize the following solution

Please correct me if I am wrong

Q. Explain at least three things that can go wrong

template<typename A, typename B, typename C>
C mymin (const A& a, const B& b)
{
  if ( a < b )
      return (C) a;
  else
      return (C) b;
}

My answer is the following.

Please let me know if I got them all right.

  1. < operator is not defined so we cannot compare the two objects with < operator

  2. Types of A and B can be different, and the < operator is not defined for that

  3. If C has a different type than A or B , type casting occurs that changes a or b that is defined constant

  4. Type casting from A or B to C is not guaranteed , because the conversion constructor is not defined.

  5. Copy constructor for A and B is not defined. Therefore we are just returning the shallowly copied one. Since it is a shallow copy , the shallow copy can be changed , and the original copy that is supposed to be constant can be changed too.

Thanks,

share|improve this question
1  
x and y are not declared? There are too many things that could be wrong in this code to make any answer meaningful. –  juanchopanza Apr 27 '13 at 8:33
    
Oh sorry I mis typed it. I corrected. THanks! –  user2172254 Apr 27 '13 at 9:14
1  
is return value of type 'G' also typo? –  alexrider Apr 27 '13 at 9:16
    
It was C. Soryy. I corrected it. –  user2172254 Apr 27 '13 at 9:22
    
What if some C++ programmer came along and gave you a zen slap for using C-style casts? OTOH no, that would be things going right, not wrong. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Apr 27 '13 at 9:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

< operator is not defined so we cannot compare the two objects with < operator
Types of A and B can be different, and the < operator is not defined for that

It is unrelated, since even if both types are the same there still could be no operator< for them.

If C has a different type than A or B , type casting occurs that changes a or b that is defined constant

Even if C is the same, there still will be constness loss.

Type casting from A or B to C is not guaranteed , because the conversion constructor is not defined.

Typecasting itself is guaranteed, but with unpredictable results in case if types differ.

Copy constructor for A and B is not defined. Therefore we are just returning the shallowly copied one. Since it is a shallow copy , the shallow copy can be changed , and the original copy that is supposed to be constant can be changed too.

There is no need for A or B to have copy constructor. The only constructor involved would be copy constructor of C, that will accept already C style cast C as param.

share|improve this answer
    
Casting doesn't change the source object unless the cast invokes a very strangely defined operator X or converting constructor. Also, the lack of constness doesn't affect the source object unless C is a reference type (where it still doesn't really affect the source object until someone "mis"-uses the resulting reference). –  Charles Bailey Apr 27 '13 at 9:39
1  
@CharlesBailey Yes it won't change object, as it will be used only to construct copy of C from whatever cast will provide, and I agree that in this case constness loss doesn't matter much. My note was rather to note that regardless of of A is the same as C or not, constness loss still occur. –  alexrider Apr 27 '13 at 9:49
    
Oh thanks, then what would be the answer for the question. That was all I could think of. But most of which is wrong.... –  user2172254 Apr 27 '13 at 9:51
    
@asd213sasdd2254121 Apart from C style cast it is hard to tell without context. I'd vote for possibility of both a<b and b<a returning true, due to different implementations of operator< in A and B. –  alexrider Apr 27 '13 at 9:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.