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class ZombieLand : public Singleton<ZombieLand>
{
    DECLARE_SINGLETON(ZombieLand);
public:
    MachineState* world[19][19];
    bool map[19][19];

    MachineState* getField(int x, int y)
    {
        return world[x][y];
    }
void setWorld(MachineState state)
{

    world[state.x][state.y] = &state;
    map[state.x][state.y] = true;

}
};

struct MachineState
{
    template <typename MachineTraits>
    friend class Machine;

    enum Facing { UP, RIGHT, DOWN, LEFT};
    MachineState()
        : m_ProgramCounter(1)
        , m_ActionsTaken(0)
        , m_Facing(UP)
        , m_Test(false)
        , m_Memory(nullptr)
        ,x(0)
        ,y(0)
        ,point1(25, 10)
        ,point2(10, 40)
        ,point3(40, 40)
    { }

    int m_ProgramCounter;
    int m_ActionsTaken;
    Facing m_Facing;
    bool m_Test;
    bool m_occupied;
    int x;
    int y;
    Point point1;
    Point point2;
    Point point3;

    int GetActionsPerTurn() const throw() { return m_ActionsPerTurn; }
    int GetMaxMemory() const throw() {return m_MaxMemory; }
    bool GetTruth() const throw() { return m_InfectOnAttack; }
    void setPoint(Point p1, Point p2, Point p3)
    {
        point1=p1;
        point2=p2;
        point3=p3;
    }
};

I later call the getField function by doing

MachineState *Field1 = ZombieLand::get().getField(state.x, state.y-1 );

The problem is that when i try to access a member by doing Field1->getTruth() it's returning me the address of the pointer rather than the actual value(false or true). I don't understand why this is happening

template <class T>
class Singleton
{
private:
    static T* _instance;
protected:
    Singleton() {}
public:
    static T& get()
    {
        if (_instance)
        {
            return *_instance;
        }
        else
        {
            _instance = new T();
            return *_instance;
        }
    }
};

if(ZombieLand::get().map[state.x+2][state.y] == true)
{
    MachineState *field3 = ZombieLand::get().getField(state.x+2, state.y);
        std::cout<<"FOUND FIELD"<<Field3->getTruth();
}

when this if statement becomes true it prints "FOUND FIELD 0246" onto my console

share|improve this question
4  
There is no MachineState code at all. It's weekend, telepathists are resting. –  Mikhail Apr 27 '13 at 8:30
    
What does getTruth() returns? –  semihyagcioglu Apr 27 '13 at 8:31
    
a boolean true or false –  John Kemp Apr 27 '13 at 8:32
    
What does get() return? –  OGH Apr 27 '13 at 8:34
    
ZombieLand implements Singleton design patter. to access anymember variable of zombieland i have to do get() and then the method call. i have added the MachineState code by the way –  John Kemp Apr 27 '13 at 8:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, now I think you've finally posted the code that has the problem

class ZombieLand : public Singleton<ZombieLand>
{
    DECLARE_SINGLETON(ZombieLand);
public:
    MachineState* world[19][19];
    bool map[19][19];

    MachineState* getField(int x, int y)
    {
        return world[x][y];
    }
    void setWorld(MachineState state)
    {
        world[state.x][state.y] = &state;
        map[state.x][state.y] = true;
    }
};

This is undefined behaviour because you are saving the pointer to a local variable state. The state variable gets destroyed after you have exited the setWorld function, so your world array is just holding pointers to destroyed objects, That's why you have garbage values.

Rewrite this class without pointers.

class ZombieLand : public Singleton<ZombieLand>
{
    DECLARE_SINGLETON(ZombieLand);
public:
    MachineState world[19][19];
    bool map[19][19];

    MachineState* getField(int x, int y)
    {
        return &world[x][y];
    }
    void setWorld(const MachineState& state)
    {
        world[state.x][state.y] = state;
        map[state.x][state.y] = true;
    }
};

Pointers are almost always a bad idea, you should try to write code without them.

Got there in the end at least.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. –  John Kemp Apr 28 '13 at 18:01

As we do not have the signature of both get and getField it is difficult to tell. But perhaps try

*(ZombieLand::get().getField(state.x, state.y-1 ))

To get the value that the pointer is pointing to.

EDIT

It helps to read the code i.e.

MachineState * world [19][19];

is a 2D array of pointers. Nowhere in this code is those pointers given a value so as it stands you are just lucky that the thing does not just die.

Therefore,

   MachineState *getField(int x, int y)
   {
    return world[x][y];
   }

As specified by the signature of the function as well!

But where in this code do you give the pointer a value or meaning?

share|improve this answer
    
i have added the singleton...get()...getField() is from ZombieLand... anytime i try to access a function outside of the class I have to do ZombieLand::get().function() –  John Kemp Apr 27 '13 at 8:42
    
i did memset(world,0,sizeof(world)) on the constructor –  John Kemp Apr 27 '13 at 8:58
    
that sets it to 0. i didn't add that here because i thought it was irrelevant –  John Kemp Apr 27 '13 at 8:59
    
@JohnKemp - Dealing with pointers I would have thought you have a new somewhere along the line. BTW starting to use memset etc. you are barking up the wrong tree. –  Ed Heal Apr 27 '13 at 9:04
    
...I don't follow the barking up the wrong tree. i had to initiate the whole 2D array to null, so memset is the simplest way to do it...y would you use a new? –  John Kemp Apr 27 '13 at 9:06
void setWorld(MachineState state)
{
    world[state.x][state.y] = &state;
    map[state.x][state.y] = true;
}

You are initializing the contents of the world array with the memory address of a local variable on the stack that goes out of scope and is no longer valid after setWorld() exits, leaving the array pointing at invalid MachineState objects. When getField() is called later on, you get random data from the current call stack.

If you want the array to point to external MachineState instances, you need to pass them in by reference instead of by value so you get the address of the original object and not a temporary anymore:

void setWorld(MachineState &state)
{
    world[state.x][state.y] = &state;
    map[state.x][state.y] = true;
}

Otherwise, change the array to not hold pointers anymore:

class ZombieLand : public Singleton<ZombieLand>
{
    DECLARE_SINGLETON(ZombieLand);
public:
    MachineState world[19][19];
    bool map[19][19];

    MachineState* getField(int x, int y)
    {
        return &world[x][y];
    }

    void setWorld(const MachineState &state)
    {
        world[state.x][state.y] = state;
        map[state.x][state.y] = true;
    }
};
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