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I've heard and read everywhere that variables are "names, not storage" in Python, and that it's important to not think of them like storage, but I've not found a single example of why that would be important. So the question is really, why is it important to distinguish between variables being names and variables being storage?

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2  
    
Variable are just names given to objects so that we can access them, an object with 0 references is garbage collected in python. – Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 27 '13 at 8:48
    
Try typing in name = 3 and then john = 3 in your python interpreter. Afterwards type in name is john, and what does your output come out as? – eazar001 Apr 27 '13 at 8:48
2  
@eazar001 it is gonna be True for 3, as small integers and strings are cached by python. – Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 27 '13 at 8:49
    
Its also important to note that Python has an object space; and a name space. Values have types. Names are just references to objects in the object spaces; and names don't have types. This is one of the key differences. In other languages, variables have a type, where in Python only values have types (one of the reasons why in Python they are called names and not variables). – Burhan Khalid Apr 27 '13 at 8:56
up vote 6 down vote accepted
a = SomeObject()
b = a

If names were storage (as they are in C and C++, for example), then both a and b would literally contain an object each:

a +---------+
  | value 1 |
  +---------+

b +---------+
  | value 2 |
  +---------+

So for example, a.x = ... would operate on value 1, and value 2 is completely uninvolved. Note that languages which do that provide values, which allow to manipulate one value by another (e.g. pointers). However, this is independent of this topic and you can do similar things in Python's model instead.

In Python and similar languages, memory looks more like this:

a +-------------+
  | reference 1 | ---------+
  +-------------+          v
                      +---------+
                      | value 1 |
                      +---------+
b +-------------+          ^
  | reference 2 | ---------+
  +-------------+

Reference here is an imaginary token which refers (duh!) to objects. There can be any number of references to any object, the object isn't aware of any of them, and objects can still linger around if there are no references to it. Also note that variables aren't the only place where references can pop up -- lists contain references, dicts contain references, objects' attributes contain references, etc. It's a bit like a pointer in C, except that it's not a discernible value, let alone object, in the language (and therefore there's no equivalent to pointer arithmetic either).

The most visible consequence is that variables can alias, so mutation of value #1 through one is visible through the other:

a.something = 1
b.something = 2
assert a.something == 2

Re-assignment of a variable is not mutation of value 1 though, it just changes the reference. In other words, a = ... does not affect b and vice versa!

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+1 for the ASCII art. – Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 27 '13 at 8:58
    
I think you're missing an important point about the linkage between names and "references". The python drawing should include two arrows. – georg Apr 27 '13 at 9:14
    
@thg435 Why should it? – delnan Apr 27 '13 at 9:18

Unlike, say C, where variables "contain" the data.
In Python, the names are references to where the data is stored.

So, with lists(mutable)

>>> x = [10]
>>> y = x
>>> id(x) == id(y) # they refer to the same object
True
>>> y.append(1) # manipulate y
>>> x # x is manipulated
[10, 1]
>>> y # and so is y.
[10, 1]

And with strings(immutable)

>>> x = '10'
>>> y = x
>>> id(x) == id(y)
True
>>> y += '1' # manipulate y
>>> id(x) == id(y) # the ids are no longer equal
False
>>> x # x != y
'10'
>>> y
'101'

When you del a variable, you remove the reference to the object, and when an object has 0 references, it is garbage-collected.

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1  
When you del a variable, you remove a reference to the object, and when an object has 0 references, it is garbage-collected. – Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 27 '13 at 8:54

This kind of stuff is usually explained by drawing boxes and arrows:

C:

pos = { .x = 1, .y = 2 }

-------            -----------
| pos |----------->| x:1 y:2 |
-------            -----------

pos2 = pos 

-------            -----------
| pos |----------->| x:1 y:2 |
-------            -----------

-------            -----------
| pos2|----------->| x:1 y:2 |
-------            -----------

pos2.x = 9

-------            -----------
| pos |----------->| x:1 y:2 |
-------            -----------

-------            -----------
| pos2|----------->| x:9 y:2 |
-------            -----------

Python:

pos = { 'x':1, 'y': 2 }

-------            -----------        -----------
| pos |----------->| 0xabcde |------->| x:1 y:2 |
-------            -----------        -----------

pos2 = pos                       

-------            -----------  
| pos |----------->| 0xabcde |--\
-------            -----------  |     -----------
                                |---->| x:1 y:2 |
-------            -----------  |     -----------
| pos2|----------->| 0xabcde |--/ 
-------            -----------  

pos2.x = 9                       

-------            -----------  
| pos |----------->| 0xabcde |--\
-------            -----------  |     -----------
                                |---->| x:9 y:2 |
-------            -----------  |     -----------
| pos2|----------->| 0xabcde |--/ 
-------            -----------  

That is, python variables are essentially pointers. They don't contain "values", but rather addresses of values. When you assign one variable to another, you're copying only the address. When you change a variable, you're actually change its underlying value.

@delnan's drawing is nicer (?) but they're missing an important point:

variables in python are not abstract "names". They do have values and these values are not mystical "references", they're pretty much concrete memory addresses. Each access to a variable involves a double indirection: first we obtain a value of a variable (which is an address), second, we look who "lives" on this address.

Note that python is not unique in this regard, other "scripting" languages use similar mechanic.

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True for mutable objects, but results may vary for immutable objects. – Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 27 '13 at 9:05
1  
@AshwiniChaudhary No. If you replace 1 and 4 with mutable objects, you get the same output. Of course, if you do something entirely different (e.g. appending to the list object instead of assigning to the name), the output is different, but that's not surprising as you did something very different ;-) – delnan Apr 27 '13 at 9:19
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@AshwiniChaudhary simply not true. >>> x = [1, 2]; y = x; x = [3, 4]; print x, y -> [3, 4] [1, 2]. – Daniel Roseman Apr 27 '13 at 9:19
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The double indirection you mention is an implementation detail. It is never observable from Python, and in fact it doesn't have to be that way. When PyPy compiles to machine code, object references may be directly on the stack, or even in registers, just like C pointers. Same for references being pointers: It never matters and it doesn't have to be that way. – delnan Apr 27 '13 at 9:21
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@thg435: you're definitely conflating the Python language with the implementation. What you're saying is useful in understanding how CPython really works, but it might or might not help people learning Python (depending on what works best for them). – Armin Rigo Apr 27 '13 at 9:54

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