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I have date in format:

26-4-03 or 26/04/03 or 26.4.3

It's working variant with Backreference Constructs:

\b\d{1,2}(\/|\.|\-)\d{1,2}\1(\d{1,2))\b

But can I write someway like this?

\b(\d{1,2})(\/|\.|\-)\1\2\1\b

May be existing any variant with like syntax?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, backreference construct is meant to assert that the text is the same as whatever matched by the capturing group that it refers to. It doesn't have the meaning of reusing a sub-pattern.

By the way, your regex can be rewritten as:

\b\d{1,2}([/.-])\d{1,2}\1\d{1,2)\b

The separator can be cleanly declared in a character class [/.-]. . loses its special meaning in a character class and is just a literal .. Do note that - is special in character class, and must be escaped, or placed at the start or the end of the character class to suppress the special meaning.

(I removed the last capturing group, since I think it is redundant - add it back if you need it).


As a side note, in PCRE/Perl regex, the subroutine call construct (?n) where n is a number that refers to a capturing group (and equivalent constructs) will let you reuse the pattern inside a capturing group (and is also used in recursive regex).

\b(\d{1,2})([/.-])(?1)\2(?1)\b

Note that in PCRE, subroutine call construct are atomic, which means that the engine will not backtrack. In Perl, the engine allows backtracking.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you write an example with (?n) construct? – ngelik Apr 27 '13 at 10:49
    
@ngelik: It is irrelevant to .NET, though. – nhahtdh Apr 27 '13 at 10:52

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