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While i'm trying to code basic lottery app for myself ( note that i'm really beginner on programming especially c#), a guy on StackOverflow said to me

rnd.Next(1, 50 * 7) % 50  // Randoming like that will be increase to chance of getting 1 and 49
rnd.Next(1, 50 ) // instead of this 

I am really wondering how can we test it ? Can we rely on this tests ? Please enlight me

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4  
For a start, you can get 0 back from the first expression, while you cannot from the second. –  O. R. Mapper Apr 27 '13 at 11:27
    
How can we get 0 ? We randomed between 1 and 49 and multiply it with 7 and mode 50 –  1342 Apr 27 '13 at 11:34
2  
@1342 Imagine that rnd.Next(1, 50*7) returned 100. Well, the remainder of 100 when divided by 50 (i.e. 100%5) is 0. Oh, by the way: rnd.Next(1,50) returns numbers between 1 and 49, not between 1 and 50. –  Matthew Watson Apr 27 '13 at 11:37
    
Aww, i thought that we are multiplying random value and after that %50 :) But there is no logic on my opinion –  1342 Apr 27 '13 at 11:39
    
I wouldn't advice taking the modulo of a random number unless you know what you're doing. It almost always biases the result. –  harold Apr 27 '13 at 11:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The last example will get a uniform distribution between 1 and 49 (inclusive). That is, the same chance for any number between (and including) 1 and 49.

The first example is much more tricky. It will first create any number between 1 and 349. The modulo 50 maps the number onto the interval 0-49 (including 0 and 49).

We now introduce the possibility to get 0 - if the random number is 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 or 300. We can also get number 1-49 through N+0, N+50, N+100, N+150, N+200, N+250, N+300

That is, 6 chances to get 0 and 7 to get any other number.

The conclusion is that the first example will give a random number betwen 0-49 (inclusive) with slightly less chance of 0 than for the other numbers.

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A correct analysis (I wrote a quick program to test it too, which concurs with your analysis). –  Matthew Watson Apr 27 '13 at 12:02
    
Well played sir. –  1342 Apr 27 '13 at 12:14

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