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Is there an elegant way to solve this?

if (condition0) {
  if(condition1) {
    do thing 1
  }
  else if(condition2){
    do thing 2
  }
}
else {
  if(condition2) {
    do thing 2
  }
  else if(condition1){
    do thing 1
  }
}

do thing 1 and do thing 2 function calls with a lot of parameters and somehow it seems like there is unnecessary repetition.

Is there is a better way of doing this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
if (condition1 && (condition0 || !condition2)) {
  do thing 1
} else if (condition2) {
  do thing 2
}
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Thanks. In the industry , would people like it if I did this, or the normal way? –  learner Apr 27 '13 at 12:05
    
I guess it depends on how complex the conditions are vs. the complexity of "do things". In general, you try to avoid redundancy: People may find an error in "do thing 1" and then forget to update the second call... –  Stefan Haustein Apr 27 '13 at 12:07
1  
If the conditions are complex, and have no side-effects, consider testing them all together and storing them in very well-named boolean variables - that will make Stefan's code a lot easier to read than long conditions –  tucuxi Apr 27 '13 at 12:11
    
I've checked - this is the shortest form possible. +1 @tucuxi: this would be helpful for some (including me), however it might be a waste of variables and could be considered as "noise" in the code. –  Qantas 94 Heavy Apr 27 '13 at 12:15

To avoid repetition of code, you could store do thing 1 and do thing 2 in functions. To make it clean.

var DoThing1 = function ()
{
   do thing 1
}

var DoThing2 = function ()
{
    do thing 2
}
if (condition0) {
    if(condition1) {
        DoThing1();
    }
    else if(condition2){
        DoThing2();
    }
}
else {
    if(condition2) {
        DoThing2(); 
    }
    else if(condition1){
        DoThing1();
    }
}
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In your case above there is no any Impact of "condition0", so you can write the code like below

if(condition2) 
 {
   do thing 2
 }
 else if(condition1)
 {
   do thing 1
 }
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1  
There is an impact of condition0 when both condition1 and condition2 are true. –  learner Apr 27 '13 at 13:19

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