Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a List of doubles in java and i want a result list with sorted in descending order

Input ArrayList is like-

  List<Double> testList=new ArrayList();

    testList.add(0.5);
    testList.add(0.2);
    testList.add(0.9);
    testList.add(0.1);
    testList.add(0.1);
    testList.add(0.1);
    testList.add(0.54);
    testList.add(0.71);
    testList.add(0.71);
    testList.add(0.71);
    testList.add(0.92);
    testList.add(0.12);
    testList.add(0.65);
    testList.add(0.34);
    testList.add(0.62);

The out put should be

0.92
0.9
0.71
0.71
0.71
0.65
0.62
0.54
0.5
0.34
0.2
0.12
0.1
0.1
0.1  
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 63 down vote accepted
Collections.sort(testList);
Collections.reverse(testList);

That will do what you want. Remember to import Collections though!

Here is the documentation for Collections.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Heuster just realized that the OP wanted descending :P fixed –  Doorknob Apr 27 '13 at 12:51
2  
Maybe it's worth mentioning that you can define your own Comparator :) –  Polygnome Apr 27 '13 at 12:53
1  
Yes, but you could sort them in various ways, depending on the use case. Sometimes you might want to sort them by distance to 0. I don't even know about the runtime characteristics of reverse, but sorting descending could actually be faster then sorting ascending and then reversing. Moreover, using a List implementation that supports Comparator as constructor argument (thus keeping it invariant) would ensure the list is sorted at all times. –  Polygnome Apr 27 '13 at 12:58
4  
@Ayesha Yes, Collections.sort uses compareTo behind the scenes. –  Doorknob Jan 13 '14 at 22:44
5  
One should actually use Collections.sort(list, Collections.reverseOrder());. Apart from being more idiomatic (and possibly more efficient), using the reverse order comparator makes sure that the sort is stable (meaning that the order of elements will not be changed when they are equal according to the comparator, whereas reversing will change the order). –  Marco13 Aug 30 '14 at 23:18

Use util method of java.util.Collections class (http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Collections.html)

  i.e  Collections.sort(list)

Infact if you want to sort custom Object you can use

 Collections.sort(List<T> list, Comparator<? super T> c) 

see collections api

share|improve this answer
//Here is sorted List alphabetically with syncronized
package com.mnas.technology.automation.utility;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;

import org.apache.log4j.Logger;
/**
* 
* @author manoj.kumar
*/
public class SynchronizedArrayList {
static Logger log = Logger.getLogger(SynchronizedArrayList.class.getName());
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static void main(String[] args) {

List<Employee> synchronizedList = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<Employee>());
synchronizedList.add(new Employee("Aditya"));
synchronizedList.add(new Employee("Siddharth"));
synchronizedList.add(new Employee("Manoj"));
Collections.sort(synchronizedList, new Comparator() {
public int compare(Object synchronizedListOne, Object synchronizedListTwo) {
//use instanceof to verify the references are indeed of the type in question
return ((Employee)synchronizedListOne).name
.compareTo(((Employee)synchronizedListTwo).name);
}
}); 
/*for( Employee sd : synchronizedList) {
log.info("Sorted Synchronized Array List..."+sd.name);
}*/

// when iterating over a synchronized list, we need to synchronize access to the synchronized list
synchronized (synchronizedList) {
Iterator<Employee> iterator = synchronizedList.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
log.info("Sorted Synchronized Array List Items: " + iterator.next().name);
}
}

}
}
class Employee {
String name;
Employee (String name) {
this.name = name;

}
}
share|improve this answer

You can use Collections.sort(list) to sort list if your list contains Comparable elements. Otherwise I would recommend you to implement that interface like here:

public class Circle implements Comparable<Circle> {}

and of course provide your own realization of compareTo method like here:

@Override
    public int compareTo(Circle another) {
        if (this.getD()<another.getD()){
            return -1;
        }else{
            return 1;
        }
    }

And then you can again use Colection.sort(list) as now list contains objects of Comparable type and can be sorted. Order depends on compareTo method. Check this https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/collections/interfaces/order.html for more detailed information.

share|improve this answer
public static void main(String arg[])
{
    List<Double> testList=new ArrayList();

   /*Adding The values to the List*/

    testList.add(0.5);
    testList.add(0.2);
    testList.add(0.9);
    testList.add(0.1);
    testList.add(0.1);
    testList.add(0.1);
    testList.add(0.54);
    testList.add(0.71);
    testList.add(0.71);
    testList.add(0.71);
    testList.add(0.92);
    testList.add(0.12);
    testList.add(0.65);
    testList.add(0.34);
    testList.add(0.62);

    /*Declare a new List for storing sorted Results*/

    List<Double> finalList=new ArrayList();


    while(!testList.isEmpty()) //perform operation until all elements are moved to new List
    {
        double rank=0;
        int i=0;
            for(double d: testList)
            {
                if(d>=rank)
                {
                    rank=d;
                }

            }
            finalList.add(rank);

            testList.remove(testList.indexOf(rank));

     }
    for(double d : finalList) {
        System.out.println(d);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
24  
Why re-invent the wheel? –  luketorjussen Apr 27 '13 at 12:58
2  
@luketorjussen cuz when you go to any job interview, they will ask you to do so –  Kick Buttowski Nov 27 '14 at 2:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.