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I am creating a program that automates creation of player characters. Below is my PlayerCharacter class. I have noticed that I repeat many operations on different variables.

public class PlayerCharacter {

    int strength, dexterity, constitution, intelligence, wisdom, charisma;
    int[] strRolls, dexRolls, conRolls, intRolls, wisRolls, charRolls;

    public void generateAbilityScoresMethod1() {

        strRolls = new int[3];
        dexRolls = new int[3];
        conRolls = new int[3];
        intRolls = new int[3];
        wisRolls = new int[3];
        charRolls = new int[3];

        for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {

            strRolls[i] = dice.Dice.D6.getNewRoll();
            strength += strRolls[i];

            dexRolls[i] = dice.Dice.D6.getNewRoll();
            dexterity += dexRolls[i];

            conRolls[i] = dice.Dice.D6.getNewRoll();
            constitution += conRolls[i];

            intRolls[i] = dice.Dice.D6.getNewRoll();
            intelligence += intRolls[i];

            wisRolls[i] = dice.Dice.D6.getNewRoll();
            wisdom += wisRolls[i];

            charRolls[i] = dice.Dice.D6.getNewRoll();
            charisma += charRolls[i];

        }


    }

    public int getStrength() {
        return strength;
    }

    public void printStrRolls() {
        System.out.println("Str: roll 1 = " + strRolls[0]);
        System.out.println("Str: roll 2 = " + strRolls[1]);
        System.out.println("Str: roll 3 = " + strRolls[2]);
    }

    public int getDexterity() {
        return dexterity;
    }

    public void printDexRolls() {
        System.out.println("Dex: roll 1 = " + dexRolls[0]);
        System.out.println("Dex: roll 2 = " + dexRolls[1]);
        System.out.println("Dex: roll 3 = " + dexRolls[2]);
    }

    public int getConsitution() {
        return constitution;
    }

    public void printConRolls() {
        System.out.println("Con: roll 1 = " + conRolls[0]);
        System.out.println("Con: roll 2 = " + conRolls[1]);
        System.out.println("Con: roll 3 = " + conRolls[2]);
    }

    public int getIntelligence() {
        return intelligence;
    }

    public void printIntRolls() {
        System.out.println("Int: roll 1 = " + intRolls[0]);
        System.out.println("Int: roll 2 = " + intRolls[1]);
        System.out.println("Int: roll 3 = " + intRolls[2]);
    }

    public int getWisdom() {
        return wisdom;
    }

    public void printWisRolls() {
        System.out.println("Wis: roll 1 = " + wisRolls[0]);
        System.out.println("Wis: roll 2 = " + wisRolls[1]);
        System.out.println("Wis: roll 3 = " + wisRolls[2]);
    }

    public int getCharisma() {
        return charisma;
    }

    public void printCharRolls() {
        System.out.println("Char: roll 1 = " + charRolls[0]);
        System.out.println("Char: roll 2 = " + charRolls[1]);
        System.out.println("Char: roll 3 = " + charRolls[2]);
    }

    public void printAbilities() {
        System.out.println("Str = " + getStrength());
        System.out.println("Dex = " + getDexterity());
        System.out.println("Con = " + getConsitution());
        System.out.println("Int = " + getIntelligence());
        System.out.println("Wis = " + getWisdom());
        System.out.println("Char = " + getCharisma());
    }

}

How can I accomplish the same tasks in a more efficient way?

share|improve this question
    
why do you store the Rolls arrays anyway?? –  UmNyobe Apr 27 '13 at 13:00
    
Mostly curiosity to see how my dice rolls are going. –  JavaPVT Apr 27 '13 at 13:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You may declare a class Ability and make strength, dexterity, ... instances thereof. The following snippet might be a start:

class Ability {

    private final int[] rolls;
    private int value;

    public Ability(int dice) {
        rolls = new int[dice];
    }

    public int roll() {
        value = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < rolls.length; i++) {
            rolls[i] = dice.Dice.D6.getNewRoll();
            value += rolls[i];
        }
        return value;
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public void printRolls() {
        // ... tbd ...
    }

}

You can the use the abilities like ...

Ability strength;
strength = new Ability(3);
strength.roll(); // get new value
System.out.println(strength.getValue()); // e.g. print
strength.printRolls(); // e.g. print rolls
share|improve this answer

How about this:

public void printRolls( String label, int[] rolls) {
    System.out.println(label + ": roll 1 = " + rolls[0]);
    System.out.println(label + ": roll 2 = " + rolls[1]);
    System.out.println(label + ": roll 3 = " + rolls[2]);
}
share|improve this answer

You can cut down repeated code line this

enum Attribute {
   Str, Con, Dex, Int, Wis, Cha
}

class PlayerCharacter {
   static final Random rand = new Random();
   static final Attribute[] ATTRS = Attributes.values();
   final int[] attr = new int[ATTRS.length];

   PlayerCharacter() {
       for(int i = 0; i < attr.length; i++)
           attr[i] = rand.nextInt(6) + rand.nextInt(6) + rand.nextInt(6) + 3;
   }

   public int getAttr(Attribute attr) {
       return attrs[attr.ordinal()];
   }

   public void printAbilities() {
        for(int i = 0; i < ATTRS.length; i++)
           System.out.println(ATTRS[i]+ " = " + attrs[i]);
  }

Note: you may want any other attributes like HP, AC, Max HP, Level, XP, etc.

share|improve this answer

You can unify all your "print three items" functions by writing a single one that takes a template string an an array, and prints the content using printf, like this:

void printWithTemplate(String template, int[] data) {
    for (int i = 0 ; i != data.length ; i++) {
        System.out.printf(template, i+1, data[i]);
    }
}

Now you can replace a call of printCharRolls with a call of

printWithTemplate("Char: roll %d = %d\n", charRolls);

a call of printWisRolls with

printWithTemplate("Wis: roll %d = %d\n", wisRolls);

and so on.

You could also put your six arrays into an array of arrays, and address them with an index instead of their name. This would let you avoid writing repeated code that changes only the name of the array.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will ponder your suggestions. They seem to be in the right direction. –  JavaPVT Apr 27 '13 at 13:10

The only thing I would do there is to create a static dice rolling method which returns the array you need, so you can generate dice roll arrays for any type of dice:

public static int[] roll(int numberOfDice, int sidesOnEachDie) {
    int[] result = new int[numberOfDice];
    for(int i = 0; i < numberOfDice; ++i) {
        result[i] = 1 + (int) Math.floor(Math.random() *
                (double) sidesOnEachDie);
    }
    return result;
}

Then you can call, for example:

intRolls = roll(3, 6);

which will give the result of rolling 3D6 in an int array.

share|improve this answer
    
My rolls are handled by a Dice enum class. –  JavaPVT Apr 27 '13 at 13:07
    
Is it too late to add the option to return multiple rolls in one go to that Dice class? It would remove the need to add for loops in the main flow of your code if you could have the Dice class return multiple results with one method call. –  Arkanon Apr 27 '13 at 13:10
    
That is certainly a viable option, I believe. –  JavaPVT Apr 27 '13 at 13:12
    
If you need to roll multiple dice frequently in your project I think this change would definitely be worth the effort. However, in answer to your main question, I think that Howard's answer is probably the best way to wrap the data and methods up together for the different attributes. –  Arkanon Apr 27 '13 at 13:17

You could keep all your properties in an int[]. So rather than having strength, dexterity, constitution, intelligence, wisdom, charisma as separate variables have one

int[] characteristics;

then 0 would be strength; 1 would be dexterity and so on.

To keep the roll values you would need a int[][].

share|improve this answer

This is less code; it is not "more efficient" in CPU use or memory use, but makes the code shorter to write and read. I assume dice rolls are random regardless of their order.

package example;

public class PlayerCharacter
{

  int strength, dexterity, constitution, intelligence, wisdom, charisma;
  int[] strRolls, dexRolls, conRolls, intRolls, wisRolls, charRolls;

  private int getScore(Dice d, int[] storage)
  {
    for (int i=0; i<storage.length; i++)
    {
      storage[i] = d.getNewRoll();
    }
    int result = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<storage.length; i++) { result += storage[i]; }

  }

  public void generateAbilityScoresMethod1()
  {

    strRolls = new int[3];
    dexRolls = new int[3];
    conRolls = new int[3];
    intRolls = new int[3];
    wisRolls = new int[3];
    charRolls = new int[3];

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
      strength      = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, strRolls);
      dexterity     = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, dexRolls);
      constitution  = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, conRolls);
      intelligence  = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, intRolls);
      wisdom        = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, wisRolls);
      charisma      = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, charRolls);

    }

  }

  public int getStrength()
  {
    return strength;
  }

  private void printArrayRolls(String label, int[] rolls)
  {
    for (int i=0; i < rolls.length; i++)
    {
      System.out.println(label + ": roll " + rolls[i]);
    }
  }

  public void printStrRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Str", strRolls);
  }

  public int getDexterity()
  {
    return dexterity;
  }

  public void printDexRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Dex", dexRolls);
  }

  public int getConsitution()
  {
    return constitution;
  }

  public void printConRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Con", conRolls);
  }

  public int getIntelligence()
  {
    return intelligence;
  }

  public void printIntRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Int", intRolls);
  }

  public int getWisdom()
  {
    return wisdom;
  }

  public void printWisRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Wis", wisRolls);
  }

  public int getCharisma()
  {
    return charisma;
  }

  public void printCharRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Char", charRolls);
  }

  public void printAbilities()
  {
    System.out.println("Str = " + getStrength());
    System.out.println("Dex = " + getDexterity());
    System.out.println("Con = " + getConsitution());
    System.out.println("Int = " + getIntelligence());
    System.out.println("Wis = " + getWisdom());
    System.out.println("Char = " + getCharisma());
  }

}
share|improve this answer

This is less code; it is not "efficient" in CPU use or memory use, but makes the code shorter to write and read. I assume dice rolls are random regardless of their order.

package example;

public class PlayerCharacter
{

  int strength, dexterity, constitution, intelligence, wisdom, charisma;
  int[] strRolls, dexRolls, conRolls, intRolls, wisRolls, charRolls;

  private int getScore(Dice d, int[] storage)
  {
    for (int i=0; i<storage.length; i++)
    {
      storage[i] = d.getNewRoll();
    }
    int result = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<storage.length; i++) { result += storage[i]; }

  }

  public void generateAbilityScoresMethod1()
  {

    strRolls = new int[3];
    dexRolls = new int[3];
    conRolls = new int[3];
    intRolls = new int[3];
    wisRolls = new int[3];
    charRolls = new int[3];

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
      strength      = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, strRolls);
      dexterity     = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, dexRolls);
      constitution  = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, conRolls);
      intelligence  = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, intRolls);
      wisdom        = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, wisRolls);
      charisma      = getScore(dice.Dice.D6, charRolls);

    }

  }

  public int getStrength()
  {
    return strength;
  }

  private void printArrayRolls(String label, int[] rolls)
  {
    for (int i=0; i < rolls.length; i++)
    {
      System.out.println(label + ": roll " + rolls[i]);
    }
  }

  public void printStrRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Str", strRolls);
  }

  public int getDexterity()
  {
    return dexterity;
  }

  public void printDexRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Dex", dexRolls);
  }

  public int getConsitution()
  {
    return constitution;
  }

  public void printConRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Con", conRolls);
  }

  public int getIntelligence()
  {
    return intelligence;
  }

  public void printIntRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Int", intRolls);
  }

  public int getWisdom()
  {
    return wisdom;
  }

  public void printWisRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Wis", wisRolls);
  }

  public int getCharisma()
  {
    return charisma;
  }

  public void printCharRolls()
  {
    printArrayRolls("Char", charRolls);
  }

  public void printAbilities()
  {
    System.out.println("Str = " + getStrength());
    System.out.println("Dex = " + getDexterity());
    System.out.println("Con = " + getConsitution());
    System.out.println("Int = " + getIntelligence());
    System.out.println("Wis = " + getWisdom());
    System.out.println("Char = " + getCharisma());
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Would whoever downvoted this care to explain why? –  rcook Apr 27 '13 at 13:37

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