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I need to append text repeatedly to an existing file in Java. How do I do that?

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14  
why does this keep getting downvoted? –  Kip Oct 26 '09 at 15:01
15  
so this site is only for working professionals? –  northpole Oct 26 '09 at 15:05
48  
Even if this is homework it's not like they're asking for the entire solution to a question - I think the question is fair game (+1). –  Adamski Oct 26 '09 at 15:12
20  
@Drew: as long as the question is not a dupe of another SO question, it is welcome here, no matter how basic. In fact, this is the goal. –  Kip Oct 26 '09 at 16:16
50  
Great question. No question too basic. The goal: being able to google "append text file java" and reach this question - which is exactly what happened. –  ripper234 Dec 3 '10 at 13:42

15 Answers 15

up vote 217 down vote accepted

Are you doing this for logging purposes? If so Apache Log4j is the de facto standard Java logging library.

If you just want something simple, this will work:

Java 7

try(PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("myfile.txt", true)))) {
    out.println("the text");
}catch (IOException e) {
    //exception handling left as an exercise for the reader
}

Older Java

try {
    PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("myfile.txt", true)));
    out.println("the text");
    out.close();
} catch (IOException e) {
    //exception handling left as an exercise for the reader
}

Notes: The second parameter to the FileWriter constructor will tell it to append to the file (as opposed to clearing the file). Using a BufferedWriter is recommended for an expensive writer (i.e. a FileWriter), and using a PrintWriter gives you access to println syntax that you're probably used to from System.out. But the BufferedWriter and PrintWriter wrappers are not strictly necessary.

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7  
You should either use java7 try-with-resources or put the close() in a finally block, in order to make sure that the file is closed in case of exception –  Svetlin Zarev Jan 2 at 10:44
    
updated with Java 7 syntax. exception handling is still left as an exercise for reader, but made the comment clearer. –  Kip Jan 14 at 17:56
    
Lets imagine that new BufferedWriter(...) throws an exception; Will the FileWriter be closed ? I guess that it will not be closed, because the close() method (in normal conditions) will be invoked on the out object, which int this case will not be initialized - so actually the close() method will not be invoked -> the file will be opened, but will not be closed. So IMHO the try statement should look like this try(FileWriter fw = new FileWriter("myFile.txt")){ Print writer = new ....//code goes here } And he should flush() the writer before exiting the try block!!! –  Svetlin Zarev Jan 14 at 19:02
    
Caution, the "Older java" example will not properly close the stream if an exception is thrown inside the try block. –  Emily L. Sep 22 at 11:17

You can use fileWriter with a true for appending.

try
{
    String filename= "MyFile.txt";
    FileWriter fw = new FileWriter(filename,true); //the true will append the new data
    fw.write("add a line\n");//appends the string to the file
    fw.close();
}
catch(IOException ioe)
{
    System.err.println("IOException: " + ioe.getMessage());
}
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Shouldn't all of the answers here with try/catch blocks have the .close() pieces contained in a finally block?

Example for marked answer:

PrintWriter out = null;
try {
    out = new PrintWriter(new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("writePath", true)));
    out.println("the text");
}catch (IOException e) {
    System.err.println(e);
}finally{
    if(out != null){
        out.close();
    }
} 

Also, as of Java 7, you can use a try-with-resources statement. No finally block is required for closing the declared resource(s) because it is handled automatically, and is also less verbose:

try(PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("writePath", true)))) {
    out.println("the text");
}catch (IOException e) {
    System.err.println(e);
}
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1  
+1 for the Java 7 update, it makes everything a lot cleaner. –  Gerard Jun 14 '13 at 20:46
    
Agreed - nice job buddy –  d'alar'cop Jun 15 '13 at 17:57
1  
When out goes out of scope, it is automatically closed when it gets garbage-collected, right? In your example with the finally block, I think you actually need another nested try/catch around out.close() if I remember correctly. The Java 7 solution is pretty slick! (I haven't been doing any Java dev since Java 6, so I was unfamiliar with that change.) –  Kip Aug 21 '13 at 18:23
    
@Kip Nope, going out-of-scope does nothing in Java. The file will get closed at some random time in the future. (probably when the program closes) –  Navin Jun 17 at 2:38

Edit - as of Apache Commons 2.1, the correct way to do it is:

FileUtils.writeStringToFile(file, "String to append", true);

I adapted @Kip's solution to include properly closing the file on finally:

public static void appendToFile(String targetFile, String s) throws IOException {
    appendToFile(new File(targetFile), s);
}

public static void appendToFile(File targetFile, String s) throws IOException {
    PrintWriter out = null;
    try {
        out = new PrintWriter(new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(targetFile, true)));
        out.println(s);
    } finally {
        if (out != null) {
            out.close();
        }
    }
}

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3  
Oh, thank you. I was amused by the complexity of all other answers. I really do not get why people like to complicate their (developer) life. –  Alphaaa Jul 29 '13 at 16:05
    
It's Java. It's designed to be complicated. :-/ –  Jeff Grigg Dec 26 '13 at 19:31

Make sure the stream gets properly closed in all scenarios.

It's a bit alarming how many of these answers leave the file handle open in case of an error. The answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/15053443/2498188 is on the money but only because BufferedWriter() cannot throw. If it could then an exception would leave the FileWriter object open.

A more general way of doing this that doesn't care if BufferedWriter() can throw:

  PrintWriter out = null;
  BufferedWriter bw = null;
  FileWriter fw = null;
  try{
     fw = new FileWriter("outfilename", true);
     bw = new BufferedWriter(fw);
     out = new PrintWriter(bw);
     out.println("the text");
  }
  catch( IOException e ){
     // File writing/opening failed at some stage.
  }
  finally{
     try{
        if( out != null ){
           out.close(); // Will close bw and fw too
        }
        else if( bw != null ){
           bw.close(); // Will close fw too
        }
        else if( fw != null ){
           fw.close();
        }
        else{
           // Oh boy did it fail hard! :3
        }
     }
     catch( IOException e ){
        // Closing the file writers failed for some obscure reason
     }
  }

Edit:

As of Java 7, the recommended way is to use "try with resources" and let the JVM deal with it:

  try(    FileWriter fw = new FileWriter("outfilename", true);
          BufferedWriter bw = new BufferedWriter(fw);
          PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(bw)){
     out.println("the text");
  }  
  catch( IOException e ){
      // File writing/opening failed at some stage.
  }
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Sample, using Guava:

File to = new File("C:/test/test.csv");

for (int i = 0; i < 42; i++) {
    CharSequence from = "some string" + i + "\n";
    Files.append(from, to, Charsets.UTF_8);
}
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I just add small detail:

    new FileWriter("outfilename", true)

2.nd parameter (true) is a feature (or, interface) called appendable (http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Appendable.html). It is responsible for being able to add some content to the end of particular file/stream. This interface is implemented since Java 1.5. Each object (i.e. BufferedWriter, CharArrayWriter, CharBuffer, FileWriter, FilterWriter, LogStream, OutputStreamWriter, PipedWriter, PrintStream, PrintWriter, StringBuffer, StringBuilder, StringWriter, Writer) with this interface can be used for adding content

In other words, you can add some content to your gzipped file, or some http process

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Using java.nio.Files along with java.nio.file.StandardOpenOption

    PrintWriter out = null;
    BufferedWriter bufWriter;

    try{
        bufWriter =
            Files.newBufferedWriter(
                Paths.get("log.txt"),
                Charset.forName("UTF8"),
                StandardOpenOption.WRITE, 
                StandardOpenOption.APPEND,
                StandardOpenOption.CREATE);
        out = new PrintWriter(bufWriter, true);
    }catch(IOException e){
        //Oh, no! Failed to create PrintWriter
    }

    //After successful creation of PrintWriter
    out.println("Text to be appended");

    //After done writing, remember to close!
    out.close();

This creates a BufferedWriter using Files, which accepts StandardOpenOption parameters, and an auto-flushing PrintWriter from the resultant BufferedWriter. PrintWriter's println() method, can then be called to write to the file.

The StandardOpenOption parameters used in this code: opens the file for writing, only appends to the file, and creates the file if it does not exist.

Paths.get("path here") can be replaced with new File("path here").toPath(). And Charset.forName("charset name") can be modified to accommodate the desired Charset.

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Library

import java.io.BufferedWriter;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileWriter;
import java.io.IOException;

Code

public void append()
{
    try
    {
        String path = "D:/sample.txt";

        File file = new File(path);

        FileWriter fileWriter = new FileWriter(file,true);

        BufferedWriter bufferFileWriter  = new BufferedWriter(fileWriter);

        fileWriter.append("Sample text in the file to append");

        bufferFileWriter.close();

        System.out.println("User Registration Completed");

    }catch(Exception ex)
    {
        System.out.println(ex);
    }
}
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Better to use try-with-resources then all that pre-java 7 finally business

static void appendStringToFile(Path file, String s) throws IOException  {
    try (BufferedWriter out = Files.newBufferedWriter(file, StandardCharsets.UTF_8, StandardOpenOption.APPEND)) {
        out.append(s);
        out.newLine();
    }
}
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    String str;
    String path = "C:/Users/...the path..../iin.txt"; // you can input also..i created this way :P

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(new FileWriter(path, true));

    try 
    {
       while(true)
        {
            System.out.println("Enter the text : ");
            str = br.readLine();
            if(str.equalsIgnoreCase("exit"))
                break;
            else
                pw.println(str);
        }
    } 
    catch (Exception e) 
    {
        //oh noes!
    }
    finally
    {
        pw.close();         
    }

this will do what you intend for..

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FileOutputStream stream = new FileOutputStream(path, true);
try {

    stream.write(

        string.getBytes("UTF-8") // Choose your encoding.

    );

} finally {
    stream.close();
}

Then catch an IOException somewhere upstream.

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I might suggest the apache commons project. This project already provides a framework for doing what you need (i.e. flexible filtering of collections).

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Create a function anywhere in your project and simply call that function where ever you need it.

Guys you got to remember that you guys are calling active threads that you are not calling asynchronously and since it would likely be a good 5 to 10 pages to get it done right. Why not spend more time on your project and forget about writing anything already written. Properly

    //Adding a static modifier would make this accessible anywhere in your app

    public Logger getLogger()
    {
       return java.util.logging.Logger.getLogger("MyLogFileName");
    }
    //call the method anywhere and append what you want to log 
    //Logger class will take care of putting timestamps for you
    //plus the are ansychronously done so more of the 
    //processing power will go into your application

    //from inside a function body in the same class ...{...

    getLogger().log(Level.INFO,"the text you want to append");

    ...}...
    /*********log file resides in server root log files********/

three lines of code two really since the third actually appends text. :P

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You can also try this :

JFileChooser c= new JFileChooser();
c.showOpenDialog(c);
File write_file = c.getSelectedFile();
String Content = "Writing into file"; //what u would like to append to the file



try 
{
    RandomAccessFile raf = new RandomAccessFile(write_file, "rw");
    long length = raf.length();
    //System.out.println(length);
    raf.setLength(length + 1); //+ (integer value) for spacing
    raf.seek(raf.length());
    raf.writeBytes(Content);
    raf.close();
} 
catch (Exception e) {
    //any exception handling method of ur choice
}
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