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I want to construct my class class C from each type in set of types ...T. sizeof...(T) is large enough so that I did not want to write out all the constructor variants as below:

// T : {T1, T2, ..., TN}
struct C
{
    C(T1);
    C(T2);
    ...
    C(TN); // Phew! I'm tired.
};

So I want to try the next:

// type_set is something like template< typename... T > struct type_set {...};
struct C 
{
    using constructible_from_types = type_set< int, double, short >;
    template< typename T0 >
    C(T0, typename std::enable_if< is_contained< T0, constructible_from_types >::value >::type * = nullptr);
};
// or
// type_set is something like template< typename... T > struct type_set { template< typename T0 > constexpr bool is_contained() {...} ...}
struct C 
{
    using constructible_from_types = type_set< int, double, short >;
    template< typename T0 >
    C(T0, typename std::enable_if< constructible_from_types::is_contained< T0 >() >::type * = nullptr);
};

But I don't know how to implement the is_contained type trait and type_set class.

And, in general, interested in the canonical implementation of solution of this problem.

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1  
Does it need to be exactly that type, or only convertible? –  Xeo Apr 27 '13 at 14:34
    
And if convertible, how do you want to pick? –  Yakk Apr 27 '13 at 14:35
    
I want the set of constructors, each of which behaves as explicit one. –  Dukales Apr 27 '13 at 14:37
    
Also I want to create a set of C&operator=(C&&) and set of C&operator=(C&) by the same manner. So I define the corresponding typedef (via using). –  Dukales Apr 27 '13 at 14:38
    
@Dukales: That doesn't answer the question - explicit only says how C can be constructed, not if it can also be constructed from, say, char, which is convertible to int. –  Xeo Apr 27 '13 at 14:39
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First off, a better constructor:

template <typename T,
          typename = typename std::enable_if<is_contained<T, T0, T1, T2>::value>
C(T) { }

// or C(T const &), or even C(T &&)
// and use "typename std::decay<T>::type" instead of just "T"

Now the trait:

#include <type_traits>

template <typename T, typename ...> struct is_contained : std::false_type { };

template <typename T, typename Head, typename ...Tail>
struct is_contained<T, Head, Tail...> : std::integral_constant<bool,
    std::is_same<T, Head>::value || is_contained<T, Tail...>::value> { };

To repeat, the usage is:

is_contained<T, double, int, char>::value

If you prefer wrapping the type list into another type, that's a simple modification, but I'd just use std::tuple as the wrapper type.


Following the comments, here's a constructor that takes a universal reference:

template <typename T,
          typename = std::enable_if<
              is_contained<typename std::decay<T>::type,
                           T0, T1, T2, T3>::value
                                   >::type>
C(T && t)
{  }

With even more magic you could even go through every element in your list and see if the constructor argument is convertible to the list item, but that may be different from what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
sure by or even C(T &&) you mean C(typename std::remove_reference< T >::type &&) (btw, I doubt that it's possible to use)? –  Dukales Apr 27 '13 at 14:15
    
@Dukales: No, the other way around. The deduced argument is T, but the thing you look up in your list should be the decayed version. Just as I say in the comment. Let me know if you want me to spell it out. –  Kerrek SB Apr 27 '13 at 14:46
    
template< typename T, typename = typename std::enable_if< is_contained< T, type_set >::value > C(T &&) { ; } Is T here an universal reference? –  Dukales Apr 27 '13 at 14:51
    
@Dukales: Yes, it is. Hence the need for decay. –  Kerrek SB Apr 27 '13 at 14:56
    
Will it lead to the need to write an explicit type in angle brackets? And supress the deduction of argument type in expected manner? –  Dukales Apr 27 '13 at 15:07
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This traits class works on any package of types, be it type_set or std::tuple:

#include <type_traits>
template<typename T, typename L> struct is_contained; // illegal
template<typename T, template<typename...>class L>
struct is_contained< T, L<> > : std::false_type {};
template<typename T, template<typename...>class L, typename T0, typename... Ts>
struct is_contained< T, L<T0, Ts...> > :
  std::integral_constant< bool,
    std::is_same<T, T0>::value
    || is_contained< T, L<Ts...> >::value
  >
{};

however, I find index_of more useful:

template<typename T, typename L, typename=void> struct index_of; // illegal
template<typename T, template<typename...>class L>
struct index_of< T, L<>, void > {}; // SFINAE enable
template<typename T, template<typename...>class L, typename T0, typename... Ts>
struct index_of<
  T,
  L<T0, Ts...>,
  typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<T, T0>>::type
> : std::integral_constant< std::size_t, 1 + index_of< T, L<Ts...> >::value >
{};
template<typename T, template<typename...>class L, typename T0, typename... Ts>
struct index_of<
  T,
  L<T0, Ts...>,
  typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, T0>>::type
> : std::integral_constant< std::size_t, 0 >
{};

which also lets you check for existence via SFINAE as index_of<T,List>::value exists iff T is in the List.

Next, I'd enable perfect forwarding on the constructor:

template<typename T>
using RemoveRefCv = typename std::remove_cv< typename remove_ref< T >::type >::type;
struct C 
{
  using constructible_from_types = std::tuple< int, double, short >;
  template< typename T, std::size_t=std::index_of<RemoveRefCv<T0>>::value >
  C(T&&);
};

(assuming you don't want to have to worry about being constructable from the const but not the non-const in your list).

You can go a step further, and accept any T that is convertible to any of the types in your list. This can require some intelligence in determining how you handle conflicts. A simple method might be to find a perfect match, and failing that find the first one that you can be convertible.

If you look up at index_of, you'll note that it does most of its work by querying std::is_same. You can write a search_for that takes the binary boolean template as an argument, and looks for the first one in the list that matches.

template<template<typename, typename>class Func, typename T, typename L, typename=void> struct search_for; // illegal
template<template<typename, typename>class Func, typename T, template<typename...>class L>
struct search_for< Func, T, L<>, void > {}; // SFINAE enable
template<
  template<typename, typename>class Func,
  typename T,
  template<typename...>class L,
  typename T0,
  typename... Ts
>
struct search_for<
  Func,
  T,
  L<T0, Ts...>,
  typename std::enable_if<!Func< T, T0 >::value
> : std::integral_constant<
  std::size_t,
  1 + search_for< Func, T, L<Ts...> >::value
> {};
template<
  template<typename, typename>class Func,
  typename T,
  template<typename...>class L,
  typename T0,
  typename... Ts
>
struct search_for<
  Func,
  T,
  L<T0, Ts...>,
  typename std::enable_if<Func<T, T0>::value>::type
> : std::integral_constant< std::size_t, 0 >
{};
template<template<typename,typename>class Func, typename T, typename L>
using SearchFor = search_for<Func, T, L>;

which I would then rewrite index_of in terms of:

template<typename T, typename List>
struct index_of:SearchFor<std::is_same, T, List> {};

Then write a class that tries index_of, and if that fails tries search_for< std::is_constructable, ... >, extracts that index, then uses that type to convert the passed in argument to that indexed type in your list:

template<std::size_t n, typename L>
struct get_type {};// SFINAE enabled
template<std::size_t n, template<typename...>class L>
struct get_type< n, L<> > {};
template<template<typename...>class L, typename T0, typename... Ts>
struct get_type< 0, L<T0, Ts...> > {
  typedef T0 type;
};
template<std::size_t n, template<typename...>class L, typename T0, typename... Ts>
struct get_type< n, L<T0, Ts...> >:
  get_type< n-1, L<Ts...> >
{};
template<std::size_t n, typename List>
using GetType = typename get_type<n, List>::type;

because if you don't do that, and your type is constructed from an int and someone passes in a short or an unsigned int or whatever, your SFINAE code will reject being constructed from something that isn't perfectly in your type list.

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