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I am using PostgreSQL 8.3.8.

I have a list of times boundaries (by date), in a time_boundaries table :

CREATE TABLE role_times_boundaries
(
  role_date DATE,
  time_boundary TIME
);

INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-24'::date, '09:00:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-24'::date, '10:00:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-25'::date, '07:00:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-25'::date, '08:50:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-25'::date, '09:00:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-25'::date, '12:00:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-25'::date, '13:00:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-25'::date, '16:00:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-25'::date, '17:30:00'::time);
INSERT INTO role_times_boundaries (role_date, time_boundary) VALUES ('2013-04-25'::date, '20:00:00'::time);

And so, I have this table content :

 role_date  | time_boundary 
------------+---------------
 2013-04-24 | 09:00:00
 2013-04-24 | 10:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 07:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 08:50:00
 2013-04-25 | 09:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 12:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 13:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 16:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 17:30:00
 2013-04-25 | 20:00:00

The goal

I would like to build a "time slice list" table by doing a self inner join on the "role_times_boundaries" by taking each time_boundary as "start_time", and the next time_boundary (by order) for the same date. The goal is to have that result :

 role_date  | start_time | end_time 
------------+------------+----------
 2013-04-24 | 09:00:00   | 10:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 07:00:00   | 08:50:00
 2013-04-25 | 08:50:00   | 09:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 09:00:00   | 12:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 12:00:00   | 13:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 13:00:00   | 16:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 16:00:00   | 17:30:00
 2013-04-25 | 17:30:00   | 20:00:00

The tentative

I tried to get the wished result via this SQL query

SELECT role_times_boundaries.role_date,
       role_times_boundaries.time_boundary AS start_time,
       end_time_boundaries.time_boundary AS end_time
FROM role_times_boundaries
INNER JOIN (
             SELECT role_date,
                    time_boundary
             FROM role_times_boundaries
           ) AS end_time_boundaries ON (
                                       role_times_boundaries.role_date = end_time_boundaries.role_date
                                       AND end_time_boundaries.time_boundary = (
                                                                                  SELECT MIN(a_list_of_end_boundaries.time_boundary)
                                                                                  FROM role_times_boundaries AS a_list_of_end_boundaries
                                                                                  WHERE a_list_of_end_boundaries.time_boundary > role_times_boundaries.time_boundary
                                                                                )
                                     )

Here's the result :

 role_date  | start_time | end_time 
------------+------------+----------
 2013-04-24 | 09:00:00   | 10:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 07:00:00   | 08:50:00
 2013-04-25 | 08:50:00   | 09:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 12:00:00   | 13:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 13:00:00   | 16:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 16:00:00   | 17:30:00
 2013-04-25 | 17:30:00   | 20:00:00

If you see well, the 09:00:00 to 12:00:00 time slice is missing ! But I still don't understand why, and still don't find my error.

share|improve this question
    
Don't you have to repeat the date-match criterion inside the SELECT MIN ( ... sub-select? –  Tim Apr 27 '13 at 15:26
1  
8.3 is no longer supported (and really old as well). You should really plan your upgrade as soon as possible (at least apply the latest patch for 8.3 which 8.3.23): postgresql.org/support/versioning –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 27 '13 at 15:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Solution

Okay, so first let's simplify your query a bit:

SELECT
  l.role_date,
  l.time_boundary AS start_time,
  r.time_boundary AS end_time
FROM role_times_boundaries l
INNER JOIN role_times_boundaries AS r ON ( -- You don't need that inner query, it's redundant
  l.role_date = r.role_date
  AND r.time_boundary = (
    SELECT MIN(r2.time_boundary)
    FROM role_times_boundaries AS r2
    WHERE r2.time_boundary > l.time_boundary))

Now the issue is that you are comparing all time_boundaries in r2, not the ones restricted by role date, so the corrected query would be:

SELECT
  l.role_date,
  l.time_boundary AS start_time,
  r.time_boundary AS end_time
FROM role_times_boundaries l
INNER JOIN role_times_boundaries AS r ON (
  l.role_date = r.role_date
  AND r.time_boundary = (
    SELECT MIN(r2.time_boundary)
    FROM role_times_boundaries AS r2
    -- Note the added restriction:
    WHERE r2.time_boundary > l.time_boundary and r2.role_date = l.role_date))

Alternate Query

The following will also work for your use case and might be more readable:

select
  l.role_date as role_date,
  l.time_boundary as start_time,
  min(r.time_boundary) as end_time
from role_times_boundaries l
join role_times_boundaries r on
  r.role_date = l.role_date
  and r.time_boundary > l.time_boundary
group by l.role_date, l.time_boundary
order by l.role_date, l.time_boundary
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks you for explaining me why my query was wrong, and also for the alternate query ! (Sorry to not upvote your answer, it seems I don't have a good reputation score) –  bouchon May 1 '13 at 11:02
    
No worries about the points. The other answer had me seriously look at window functions, so we all won. :) –  Julien Langlois May 2 '13 at 23:08

If you upgrade to PostgreSQL 8.4 or later, you could use window functions ("analytic functions" in Oracle parlance), such as rank(), row_number(), lead(), and lag():

SELECT tb.role_date AS role_date
        , tb.time_boundary AS start_time
        , LEAD (time_boundary) OVER www AS end_time
FROM role_times_boundaries tb
WINDOW www AS (PARTITION BY tb.role_date ORDER BY tb.time_boundary)
        ;

or another equivalent of the preceding query:

SELECT tb.role_date AS role_date
        , tb.time_boundary AS start_time
        , LEAD (time_boundary) OVER ( PARTITION BY tb.role_date ORDER BY tb.time_boundary) AS end_time
FROM role_times_boundaries tb;

which would give you the following result set:

 role_date  | start_time | end_time 
------------+------------+----------
 2013-04-24 | 09:00:00   | 10:00:00
 2013-04-24 | 10:00:00   | 
 2013-04-25 | 07:00:00   | 08:50:00
 2013-04-25 | 08:50:00   | 09:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 09:00:00   | 12:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 12:00:00   | 13:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 13:00:00   | 16:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 16:00:00   | 17:30:00
 2013-04-25 | 17:30:00   | 20:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 20:00:00   | 
(10 rows)

To remove the periods that don't have an end_time, you could wrap this up into a subquery:

SELECT role_date , start_time , end_time
FROM (
        SELECT tb.role_date AS role_date
        , tb.time_boundary AS start_time
        , LEAD (time_boundary) OVER ( PARTITION BY tb.role_date ORDER BY tb.time_boundary) AS end_time
        FROM role_times_boundaries tb
        ) sq
WHERE sq.start_time <= sq.end_time;

which would then give you the following result:

 role_date  | start_time | end_time 
------------+------------+----------
 2013-04-24 | 09:00:00   | 10:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 07:00:00   | 08:50:00
 2013-04-25 | 08:50:00   | 09:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 09:00:00   | 12:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 12:00:00   | 13:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 13:00:00   | 16:00:00
 2013-04-25 | 16:00:00   | 17:30:00
 2013-04-25 | 17:30:00   | 20:00:00
(8 rows)

UPDATE: Another alternative query avoiding the use of WINDOW functions which solves the problem via the use of NOT EXISTS keyword:

SELECT lo.role_date
        , lo.time_boundary AS start_time
        , hi.time_boundary AS end_time
FROM role_times_boundaries lo
JOIN role_times_boundaries hi
    ON lo.role_date = hi.role_date
    AND lo.time_boundary < hi.time_boundary
    AND NOT EXISTS ( -- eliminate the men in the middle ...
        SELECT * FROM role_times_boundaries nx
        WHERE   nx.role_date = hi.role_date
        AND nx.time_boundary > lo.time_boundary
        AND nx.time_boundary < hi.time_boundary
        );
share|improve this answer
    
NOT EXISTS strikes again! :) +1 on upgrade / window function. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 28 '13 at 2:34
    
@wildplasser Thanks ! I didn't know about the "window functions", I will be less stupid tonight than I was this morning ! (Sorry to not upvote your answer, it seems I don't have a good reputation score) –  bouchon May 1 '13 at 11:07
    
Window functions are "relatively" new. Once you master them, they can save you a lot of typing subqueries. WRT to upvote: Its Okay. spare your bullets. Answers for stuff like this tend to come slower than for typical programming stuff. And not everyone is awake and willing all the time... (Erwin is, though, and he is a fast typist! ) –  wildplasser May 1 '13 at 11:16
1  
@Priidu Neemre: your edit seems Okay, but IMHO you could pay a bit more respect to my indenting style. The ; are on a line by their own for a reason: a human reader has its focus on the left side of the line. That is also the reason why I (and many others) put the , at the beginning of a line: it helps the reader to keep sychronised on the syntax. –  wildplasser Sep 15 '14 at 21:15
    
@wildplasser, Read and noted :). Sorry for messing with the ; - it looked arbitrary at first but as I can see now, it follows a clear and concise pattern. Feel free to change it back whenever you feel like it (you don't need to struggle your edits through the suggestions queue due to your rep level, if I remember correctly?). –  Priidu Neemre Sep 16 '14 at 6:15

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