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I need to call a function from "declaration" type on some object from outside the class. I did a small code sample and put as comments the desired behavior as I don't know exactly how to ask this:)

template<typename T>
void hun(T* obj, class C* c)
{
    //do some checking on c
    if(some conditions from c are true)
    {
        //call fun from T ignoring it's virtual
    }
}

struct A
{
    virtual void fun(){};
    virtual void gun(class C* c)
    {
        //do something specific to A
        hun(this, c); //here call fun from A even if real type of this is B
    };
}

struct B : public A
{
    void fun(){};
    void gun(class C* c)
    {
        //do something specific to B
        hun(this, c);//here call fun from B even if real type of this is something derived from B
    };
}

Is it possible to achieve this behavior?

I know I can call fun() from inside the class using A::fun() or B::fun(), but the checking from hun() is common for all classes and I don't want to pollute gun() with this code.

share|improve this question
    
Are you mean obj->T::fun() ? –  A.Danesh Apr 27 '13 at 14:44
    
@A.Danesh yes:) I didn't knew this is possible –  Felics Apr 27 '13 at 14:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

(This has probably been already answered somewhere else..)

You can explicitly call one override of a virtual function using a qualified-id. A qualified-id for a member function is of the form my_class::my_function.

For reference, see C++ Standard [expr.call]/1:

If the selected function is non-virtual, or if the id-expression in the class member access expression is a qualified-id, that function is called. Otherwise, its final overrider (10.3) in the dynamic type of the object expression is called.

Example

template<typename T>
void hun(T* obj, class C* c)
{
    //do some checking on c
    if(some conditions from c are true)
    {
        //call fun from T ignoring it's virtual
        obj->T::fun(); // T::fun is a qualified-id
    }
}

struct A
{
    virtual void fun(){};
    virtual void gun(class C* c)
    {
        //do something specific to A
        hun(this, c); //here call fun from A even if real type of this is B
    };
}; // note: semicolon was missing

struct B : public A
{
    void fun(){};
    void gun(class C* c)
    {
        //do something specific to B
        hun(this, c);//here call fun from B even if real type of this is something derived from B
    };
};
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thanks! –  Felics Apr 27 '13 at 14:44
    
@DyP Yes, this is a very important technique. This is especially important when the code is part of your bottleneck and you need to tweak it. A function call made via its full-qualified function name is never made virtual. This means that you don't have to do a slightly more expensive virtual function call, but the most important part means that it becomes a candidate for inlining. Inlining doesn't just prevent the function call overhead, it introduces many new optimization opportunities for the compiler, albeit at the expense of (usually but not always) larger code. –  Daniel Santos Apr 27 '13 at 16:22

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