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I have a class with two properties, when i set a new value for foo i want that the value of bar also change, so i can go with something like this:

class MyClass(object):

  _foo = ''
  _bar = ''

  @property
  def foo(self):
    return self._foo

  @foo.setter
  def foo(self, foo):
    self._foo = foo.lower()
    self._bar = foo.upper()

  @property
  def bar(self):
    return self._bar

I don't want to reflect the change in the other direction in a way that when i change bar the value of foo change, so i not implement the setter for bar.

Reading about clean code practices i found that is a good habit to name your methods according to what exactly they do, so i thought that instead of use the syntax above i can go with this definition that seems to be more self explanatory:

def set_foo_and_bar(self, foo):
  self._foo = foo.lower()
  self._bar = foo.upper()

The problem now is that i lost the pythonic syntax object.property. Sincerely i think that this is a dummy question but i want to know what is a good practice for dealing with the definitions of this kind of dependent operations, should i use the first syntax or the second?, what if the setter method change the state more drastically, say change more properties?, should i use comments to remark that there is a dependency between that two properties? or just let the client discover that 'magic' behavior for his own?

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2  
With your placeholder names, of course it's not obvious. But in real code, I'd assume any case where this is not clear comes from bad naming. For example, assume integer properties width and right_border of a GUI widget. Not so surprising now, is it? –  delnan Apr 27 '13 at 15:16
    
@delnan with your widget sample is clear that the properties are dependent, say i change width so size change also, but with properties that are not too near semantically i think that would be difficult to avoid that 'mental mapping' if i am not explicit in the definition. –  Twissell Apr 27 '13 at 15:23
    
Please give an example. As I said, I can only imagine the problem comes from unclear names or something. Or perhaps the properties shouldn't be affecting one another. –  delnan Apr 27 '13 at 15:25
    
@delnan the problem is that i have a name property for a font type and the property that have to change is the url name of the font, so i have font_name and font_url_name. font name can be 'foo bar' and font_url_name 'foo-bar' –  Twissell Apr 27 '13 at 15:27
    
That too seems pretty obvious... –  delnan Apr 27 '13 at 15:44

1 Answer 1

I realize this is an old question, but it seems like the answer is fairly simple. The foo.setter decorator returns a new property object, with the decorated function as the setter of that property, and decorator syntax means that this return value is stored in place of the function. So, if you want your foo property to work correctly, you need to name the decorated function foo as well. If you use a different function name, you either can't use the decorator syntax, or you will have broken properties.

If having meaningful variable names is of critical importance to you, you should probably manually apply property to your getter and setter methods:

class MyClass(object):

  _foo = ''
  _bar = ''

  def _get_foo(self):
    return self._foo

  def _set_foo_and_bar(self, foo):
    self._foo = foo.lower()
    self._bar = foo.upper()

  foo = property(_get_foo, _set_foo_and_bar)

  @property
  def bar(self):
    return self._bar

This doesn't seem terribly useful to me. I'd always favor the decorator syntax unless there was a pressing reason not to. The code in the question does things perfectly properly.

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