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I have been teaching myself Haskell for a month or so and today I was reading the solution of 16th problem and came up with a question.

Here is a link : http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/99_questions/Solutions/16

Basically, this question asks to make a function that drops every N'th element from a list. For example,

*Main> dropEvery "abcdefghik" 3

"abdeghk"

The first solution in the link is

dropEvery :: [a] -> Int -> [a]
dropEvery [] _ = []
dropEvery (x:xs) n = dropEvery' (x:xs) n 1 
  where
       dropEvery' (x:xs) n i = (if (n `divides` i) then [] else [x])++ (dropEvery' xs n (i+1))
       dropEvery' [] _ _ = []
       divides x y = y `mod` x == 0

My question is why dropEvery defines the case of empty lists while dropEvery' can take care of empty list? I think dropEvery [] _ = [] can be simply eliminated and modifying a bit of other sentences as following should work exactly the same as above and looks shorter.

dropEvery :: [a] -> Int -> [a]
dropEvery xs n = dropEvery' xs n 1 
  where
       dropEvery' (x:xs) n i = (if (n `divides` i) then [] else [x])++ (dropEvery' xs n (i+1))
       dropEvery' [] _ _ = []
       divides x y = y `mod` x == 0

Can anyone help me figure out about this?

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1  
Note that the argument order of this function is "wrong"; functions like this are usually Int -> [a] -> [a], which is normally much more useful for pipeline situations. Why they put it the other way around in that example, I have no idea. –  leftaroundabout Apr 28 '13 at 10:22
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think they are the same and the author could have simplified the code as you suggested. For the heck of it I tried both versions with QuickCheck and they seem to be the same.


import Test.QuickCheck

dropEvery :: [a] -> Int -> [a]
dropEvery [] _ = []
dropEvery (x:xs) n = dropEvery' (x:xs) n 1 
  where
       dropEvery' (x:xs) n i = (if (n `divides` i) then [] else [x])++ (dropEvery' xs n (i+1))
       dropEvery' [] _ _ = []
       divides x y = y `mod` x == 0

dropEvery2 :: [a] -> Int -> [a]
dropEvery2 xs n = dropEvery' xs n 1 
  where
       dropEvery' (x:xs) n i = (if (n `divides` i) then [] else [x])++ (dropEvery' xs n (i+1))
       dropEvery' [] _ _ = []
       divides x y = y `mod` x == 0

theyAreSame xs n = (dropEvery xs n) == (dropEvery2 xs n)
propTheyAreSame xs n = n > 0 ==> theyAreSame xs n

And in ghci you can do

*Main> quickCheck propTheyAreSame 
+++ OK, passed 100 tests.

I also tested a few corner cases by hand

*Main> dropEvery [] 0
[]
*Main> dropEvery2 [] 0
[]
*Main> dropEvery [] undefined
[]
*Main> dropEvery2 [] undefined
[]

So them seem to the same.

So our learning outcomes:

  1. Quickcheck is perfect for this kind of stuff
  2. Don't underestimate yourself. :)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer! I am happy to hear that my guess was correct. I did not know about Quickcheck. Do I need to be able to use GHC to use that? –  Tengu Apr 27 '13 at 17:25
    
@Tengu You don't use GHC? You can use runghc or ghci too, but I'm sure QuickCheck will work on entirely different compilers too. You can google for an installation guide but since it's a very common library it should be very easy to install. –  Tarrasch Apr 27 '13 at 19:00
    
I just started Haskell last month and I have never used GHC compiler. (Well actually I do not even know what "compiler" means at the first place even though my friend in computer science major explained for me many times haha) I will look up QuickCheck but I may not be prepared for those things. Thank you for your answer! –  Tengu Apr 28 '13 at 3:27
1  
@Tengu Oh alright. Please learn in whatever pace you find comfortable, in time your knowledge will mature and you'll in natural way explore more of programming. On an unrelated note: If you found my answer useful, please consider to accept it. –  Tarrasch Apr 28 '13 at 3:31
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