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I have the syntax below. I was wondering if this part: $($(this).parent().siblings('div')[0]) could be writen more elegantly by accessing a jQuery object directly without the need to use $(); again.

I used .parent().siblings and didn't use the class of div because I want to reuse the code somewhere where the classes are different.

$('textarea').click(function(){
     $($(this).parent().siblings('div')[0]).html('<span>140</span>');
     $($(this).parent().siblings('div')[1]).html('<span>Reply</span>');
});

<div class="post_area2">
    <div class="wrap_area2 left">
        <textarea></textarea> 
    </div>
    <div class="word_c left"></div>
    <div class="submit left"></div>   
</div>
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2  
Show you html .. –  Mohammad Adil Apr 27 '13 at 16:36
    
@MohammadAdil - Why? The question is strictly about the jQuery notation. –  Richard JP Le Guen Apr 27 '13 at 16:39
1  
@RichardJPLeGuen So that someone can suggest better option's.. –  Mohammad Adil Apr 27 '13 at 16:40
    
The OP wasn't asking for improvements to their HTML structure: only for a way to consolidate their jQuery code. We should focus on what they asked. –  Richard JP Le Guen Apr 27 '13 at 16:52
2  
Having the HTML is a useful if you want to create a jsfiddle, otherwise you have to guess. –  Xotic750 Apr 27 '13 at 16:57
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try

$('textarea').click(function(){
     $(this).parent().next().html('<span>140</span>')
      .next().html('<span>Reply</span>');
});

http://jsfiddle.net/rVfJ4/

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this one is realy a elegant way to do it. –  Bogdan Volosincu Apr 27 '13 at 16:48
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You can use .eq() method.

$('textarea').click(function(){
     $(this).parent().siblings('div')
                     .eq(0).html('<span>140</span>').end()
                     .eq(1).html('<span>Reply</span>');
});
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2  
very interesting, i never used end() thanks –  Bogdan Volosincu Apr 27 '13 at 16:41
    
@undefined pls add some more explanation.. want to know what end() does in this example –  Amitd Apr 27 '13 at 16:48
    
@Amitd check here –  Bogdan Volosincu Apr 27 '13 at 16:51
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I agree with sweetamylase's answer. That code should work. Because it is using native javascript, I think it is good for performance.

Or use class name for determinate div:

$('textarea').click(function(){
    var parentDiv = $(this).parents('div.post_area2'); // avoid to use $(this) multi time in this function
    parentDiv.find('div.word_c').html('<span>140</span>');
    parentDiv.find('div.submit').html('<span>Reply</span>');
});

That will work exactly even you add new another div.

Don't use 'eq()' if you have another solution.

I'm sorry, I'm not enough reputation for voting.

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at somethings it's more important the elegance of the code than performance because that piece of logic will not have a impact very big so it's more important have a good code that is maintainable –  Bogdan Volosincu Apr 27 '13 at 17:12
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I would re-write it as such:

$('textarea').click(function(){
     var divContainer = $(this).parent().siblings('div');
     divContainer[0].innerHTML = '<span>140</span>';
     divContainer[1].innerHTML = '<span>Reply</span>';
});

You can use native attribute innerHTML to set the contents of the DOM element, it is equivalent to using .html() minus the requirement of invoking the jQuery object.

Also, it depends if your coding style likes to do chaining because that's really easily done with jQuery, but can be difficult to read when the line becomes long.

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3  
This will fail, as divContainer[0] is a simple div not a jQuery object. –  SoonDead Apr 27 '13 at 16:40
1  
You could use divContainer.eq(0) though. –  David Thomas Apr 27 '13 at 16:40
1  
You are right @sweetamylase, but you have written .html() before you edited your answer :) Now it is ok. –  SoonDead Apr 27 '13 at 16:43
1  
Using html() allows jquery to do cleanups if jquery added data to the child nodes of this element. Otherwise you could get memory leaks. –  t.niese Apr 27 '13 at 16:45
1  
@SoonDead If you're going to use jQuery to add/remove elements, you should always use it. If you look at the jQuery source code, which I don't expect you to do, jQuery does a lot of cleanup (for internal things, like event handlers and data) when you call methods like .remove(), .empty(), .html(), .replaceWith(), etc. So if you decide not to use jQuery to manipulate the DOM, the cleanup won't necessarily happen. –  Ian Apr 27 '13 at 17:32
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You should give the other divs extra classes to represent what they mean.

$('textarea').click(function(){
     $(this).parents('form').children('.hide-until-using-form').show();
});

This creates a highly reusable function that doesn't depend on how many siblings are involved, what the text of the button is (Post? Edit?), etc.

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There is infinite ways to do it,

You can think a bit out of the box, i'm not sure that the latest version of jquery optimize the access to elements, if i'm wrong feel free to make me sorry on it.

But here are a few ways to do it:

var parentSelector = $(this).parent().parent();
var parentSelector = $(this).parents('#uniqueId');

var currentId = this.id;
var childrenSelector = parentSelector.children('div[id!="' + currentId + '"'];

var one = $(childrenSelector.get(0));
var two = $(childrenSelector.get(1));

A simple way to optimize the access to elements is to wrap/create new function that save reference to DOM elements, there is some issues that need to be consider but you can make a nice dom-cache library.

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Perhaps like this

$('textarea').click(function () {
    var parentSiblings = $(this).parent().siblings('div');

    $(parentSiblings[0]).html('<span>140</span>');
    $(parentSiblings[1]).html('<span>Reply</span>');
});

Or

$('textarea').click(function () {
    var parentSiblings = $($(this).parent().siblings('div'));

    parentSiblings.eq(0).html('<span>140</span>');
    parentSiblings.eq(1).html('<span>Reply</span>');
});

Others may see using vanilla javascript more elegant.

function empty(element) {
    "use strict";

    while (element.hasChildNodes()) {
        element.removeChild(element.lastChild);
    }
}

function addEvent(nodeList, type, callBack) {
    "use strict";

    var length = nodeList.length,
        i = 0;

    while (i < length) {
        nodeList[i].addEventListener(type, callBack, false);
        i += 1;
    }
}

addEvent(document.getElementsByTagName("textarea"), "click", function (evt) {
    "use strict";

    var divContainer = evt.target.parentNode.parentNode.getElementsByTagName("div"),
        span;

    empty(divContainer[1]);
    span = document.createElement("span");
    span.textContent = "140";
    divContainer[1].appendChild(span);

    empty(divContainer[2]);
    span = document.createElement("span");
    span.textContent = "Reply";
    divContainer[2].appendChild(span);
});

These and others are available on jsfiddle

I guess it depends on how exactly you define more elegant. Sometimes readability is more important, perhaps not including ant 3rd party libraries and using vanilla javascript.

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